Debate and Discussion

Anime/Manga a valued art form?
Mazoo at 11:21AM, Jan. 7, 2006
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Anime and manga have been on the rise for a while now, and this sudden boom in popularity has flooded the internet with countless new artists (and old alike!) that fill art galleries with anime and manga. Is this a true art form, or is it not? Is it a fluke that let's artists get away with improper anatomy (eg. deformations of “big heads” or facial expressions) or not?

I personally draw anime/manga, but I would like to expand my artistic ability to other areas, such as landscape or realism, but that's not what this debate is about.

What are your thoughts on anime/manga or artists that draw them?

Discuss if you want, but please be respectful, alright? I've seen some art-bashing on the review forum about anime and manga, and I don't think that that type of comment counts as a valid dicussion. If you don't like, so be it, but don't be rude about it, please.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
Ian Jay at 8:12PM, Jan. 7, 2006
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Formally, I think that manga is a valid form of comics, and it's wonderful that such a unique drawing style has found so wide an audience.

Personally, though, I think that manga is a bit restricting towards creativity. Every time somebody decides to jump on the bandwagon and draw some saltine-cracker-boring-looking manga character, it becomes that much harder to make that character seem unique and integral to the plot. Don't get me wrong– I've seen manga that was engrossing and inspiring– but, well, if you want to get recognized in the industry these days, you have to do something different.

I'm not saying that all manga is bad. I'm just saying that, well, it doesn't seem like anything special anymore. Feel free to disagree with me…

~IJ
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:56PM
Hawk at 9:22PM, Jan. 7, 2006
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I've been trying for a while now to get away from manga. I have this problem… the minute something becomes popular, I don't like it anymore and I try to be unique. Manga is hard to shake, though. I'd say it's a legitimate art form, but I hate to see it as this faddish sort of endulgent crap that it has become all over the internet and on TV. People need to appreciate it in its natural environment and stop cheapening it with oversaturation and cheap knock offs.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:45PM
Ian Jay at 9:28PM, Jan. 7, 2006
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Hawk
I've been trying for a while now to get away from manga. I have this problem… the minute something becomes popular, I don't like it anymore and I try to be unique. Manga is hard to shake, though. I'd say it's a legitimate art form, but I hate to see it as this faddish sort of endulgent crap that it has become all over the internet and on TV. People need to appreciate it in its natural environment and stop cheapening it with oversaturation and cheap knock offs.

Totally. I'd be happier with a handful of really good manga than a truckload of really bad or even just mediocre manga. Just like TV shows…

~IJ
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:56PM
Aurora Moon at 9:51PM, Jan. 7, 2006
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Well. I must confess that I'm one of those who draws Manga…

although I don't draw it because it's popular.. in fact I was attempting to draw manga and reading manga even BEFORE it was popular…

Let me tell you, it was hard to get the Manga series I wanted in the days before it got popular.

and needless to say, I don't mind the popularity right now… makes it easier for me to get the series I want. :D

Although, I do understand your concerns about something like it getting over hyped.

I do dislike it when something is more hyped up than it should be, but however that doesn't stop me from reading things and or doing things that I like.

And frankly, there's so many different kinds of manga styles besides the typical “deformed head with big eyes” types.

In fact it seems that to me there are 3 types to Manga:

1. The anime look. This is the most typical of all Manga, where the characters have bigger eyes than usual.


2. The Semi-realistic look. It's closer to looking realistic, although it still retains that anime look. a lot of manga series have this. Pet shop of horrors for instance..



3. The more realistic look out of them all. although this isn't as common as number one, this still can be found in a lot of manga. But most often usually found in Chinese Manga.
(couldn't find a good example of Chiense Manga on the net to show you what I mean)

So, in a way Manga is still pretty much like American Comics in a way. some American Comics are pretty cartoon, others are semi-realistic, while some are mostly realistic-looking (despite magical superheroes or whatnot).

It's just all in where and how you look for the series and style you like
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:09AM
Black_Kitty at 10:39PM, Jan. 7, 2006
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Aurora Moon
3. The more realistic look out of them all. although this isn't as common as number one, this still can be found in a lot of manga. But most often usually found in Chinese Manga.
(couldn't find a good example of Chiense Manga on the net to show you what I mean)

Storm Riders perhaps?

My opinion of anime/manga is that even though they feature exaggeration, there is logic within the system. If you can understand anatomy and porportions correctly, then you can successfully deform them and get away with it. That's why anime/manga can get away with such exaggeration because professional artists know how to correctly exaggerate them.

Is it a legitimate artform? I think my personal issue with the question is what kind of anime/manga style are we talking about? Aurora Moon touched upon this but really, what is anime/manga? Is it anything Asian? Or just Japanese? Is it big eyes small mouth? Or exaggerated cuteness? And if anime/manga isn't legitimate, then how legitimate is the styles used for American comics?

.: Black Kitty :.
  
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
ozoneocean at 2:46AM, Jan. 8, 2006
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I see your idea behind the debate topic here, but in the main it’s unfortunately completely irrelevant. If I can my own excrement and sell it at a gallery opening: that is a legitimate art form. Although it’s already been done before, so I wouldn’t make as much money…
The point is, anything at all can be justified as “a legitimate art form”. So it’s absolutely pointless to debate anime/manga in those terms.

Black Kitty’s approach is better, Aurora too: What is Anime and Manga?
Basically these days it’s whatever looks like Japanese comics and cartoons. You’re sort of asking weather something that looks like Japanese comic art is worth less than if it looks like “Western” comic art.
So the answer must be: get over it, the look is superficial. You can like it, dislike it, or not care. You can even feel ambivalent about drawing in that style, but trying to justify or define weather it’s OK intellectually and artistically is superfluous.

If you’re wondering about it yourself, all you’re doing is navel gazing. If you want to define what other’s should do, then you’re being an arsehole.
-To put it bluntly.
(I'm not calling anyone here an arsehole either)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
Mazoo at 8:28AM, Jan. 8, 2006
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Very good point, Ozoneocean. Art made by one person can't be defined by another. I guess I was trying to touch upon the sudden popularity in anime and manga, of any style.

Hawk touched upon it, saying that it's a bit over-hyped. And anything that becomes over-hyped tends to become a bit trite.

Maybe I should change the debate topic to if you believe this style of art has become over-popular. (thanks to Ozeonocean's valid point! :) )

I do know that many, of all, of the professional anime and/or manga artists have studied realistic anatomy, so they are able to deform the figure sucessfully. However, as young beginner artists are trying out this art form, they do not have that background knowledge of the human figure. From past experience, is it hard to start out at this deformation style and then try and go back to the realistic approach. I'm not saying that it's a bad style for young artists to try, but it certainly doesn't help them in the long run.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
Aurora Moon at 9:50AM, Jan. 8, 2006
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Black Kitty
Aurora Moon
3. The more realistic look out of them all. although this isn't as common as number one, this still can be found in a lot of manga. But most often usually found in Chinese Manga.
(couldn't find a good example of Chinese Manga on the net to show you what I mean)

Storm Riders perhaps?

Yes, that's it exactly. you got it spot on. :D

And it would seem that Manga is just another word for “Comic” in Japan and other Asian area. heck, they even call the DC comics over there “Manga”… they call it “American Manga”. ^_^;;

So really, the word “Manga” is just a short, cooler way of saying Asian-style comics… or even just comics in general.

And I think that with any style out there, you're bound to have a lot of beginner comic artists out there attempting to draw the certain styles even though they don't even have knowledge in drawing bodies correctly.

The whole Manga thing, I think, is simply popular with those beginners because they think it's much easier to mimic than the semi-realistic styles or even the realistic look.
In a way, they're half-way right. However, they will always have that amateur look to their comics if they don't even bother to attempt other styles and have never studied the basic knowledge of the human body at all.
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:09AM
ccs1989 at 10:38AM, Jan. 8, 2006
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Ah this discussion. I hesitate to reply because I've posted my opinions on the old DD forums, on the smackjeeves forums, and on other forums as well, and I don't feel like typing all that out again.

There's a lot of manga I like, and a lot I think could be improved. But..I seem to have a problem with making my characters cliche. I wish I could make a character be as cool as Alucard or a deep as Guts, but at my current skill level the writing needs to more or less match the art, so instead of trying to do something crazily deep I'll keep trying to do something enjoyable and improve as I go along.

Also I don't only like the manga artform. I own more manga than Japanese comics, but I own a lot of American comics too. I'm inspired by both. I really like the clean lined style of American comics though, as opposed to the weirdness some manga, such as a lot of shoujo manga, does with it's characters and layouts.

And yeah, developed manga is a real artform I'd say.
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“If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.”
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:37AM
zactheninja at 1:37PM, Jan. 8, 2006
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I think anime/manga is a great starting point in comics.
I know I sure as hell have my roots there (and Joshbabes and McFarlanes Spiderman)
but I wouldn't suggest keeping the style unless you're amazing at it.

For one it's hard to stray away from. It's taken me 7 years to ALMOST not be manga.

But then again what is Manga?
No one can genuinley have their own style.
Styles are derived from other peoples styles and whatever style you have is a mixture of everything you've ever seen.

I think that if manga is your thing then go for it.
But try an original idea (although those are all gone <3)
But there are many manga webcomics I enjoy.
It's like reading the ones in stores, but most of the time the ones online are free and better!
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:54PM
Takami826 at 9:44AM, Jan. 12, 2006
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Hi, new here, throwing in a couple pennies…

There's a huge variety of manga… an example of more realistic and very far away from the huge eyes/hooters/small mouth manga…




To stay on topic, I think it's legit. Comic art is comic art whether you call it comics, manga, mahnwa (sp) or whatever. If it's well-done art and backed with a good story, it's good material. If it's neither, it will stink. I'm probably way too black and white in my view on it.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:06PM
mykill at 11:08AM, Jan. 12, 2006
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It's a dumb and perhaps biased question. All “manga” is, is comics! If you actually look at Japanese comics, they're entirely too diverse to be be ‘lumped together’ - and it's an insult to the creators to do so.

That said, Japanese comics do have a tendency to represent specific influences that are distinct from those of American comics.

As in many things, success breeds imitation. And what passes for ‘manga’ in the popular consciousness is the imitation, not the art that is a legit and personal expression that is being imitated.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:09PM
Eggbert at 11:21AM, Jan. 12, 2006
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I think a big thing about Manga's popularity is just that there's SO MUCH of it. Bookstores have entire walls devoted to the stuff. That and each volume is about 200 pages long, as opposed to the 24 page or so american comic book.

That's a reason I buy a lot of it anyways. I almost never buy indiviual issues of american comics unless I see something really interesting. I go for the collections. I understand that in Japan manga gets published on a weekly basis, but it isn't usually sold over here in doses as small.

Manga is probabley pretty cheap too. It's usually just black and white, with rare shading, and almost never full color for an entire book like many american comics.

The only magna related things that sicken me are stuff like “Marvel Manga” with all the superheros redrawn in typical huge eyes anime style. Come on! That is the cheapest attempt to cash in on a fad I've ever seen.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:19PM
Anonymous at 1:33PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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Wow, this topic goes all over the place, but to the point of the original post, asking if ‘manga’ is an artform is the same as asking ‘are comics an artform’. Which, if I remember my history right, is a battle that still rages to some degree today. I think most people will agree, sequential art is an artform, regardless of language used to describe it.

People have a hard time seperating style from substance too. When most people hear the word ‘manga’ they immediately reference the visual style that we in North America are now becoming rather intimately familiar with. At least the ‘main stream’ visual style that is being imported in both foreign and domestic animated and sequential art entertainment. And while I'm a big fan of the artistic styles of manga ( of which there are as many as individual fingerprints), there are just some things which should NOT be ported over to that ‘style’ for the sake of popularity. (GI Joe and He-man come to mind..)

But along with the imported style there is a subtle visual language within it which engrains many aspects of japanese culture, which is just frankly wrong when people who are not really familiar with it try to use it. Its like speaking a foreign language with no idea of the grammar or context. I'm not saying I'm an authority on the usage of this, but at least I recognize it exists.

There is also the seperation of the actual story and true substance of a comic from the visual art. If you strip the pretty pictures and colors of the art of a comic, all you have left is the words. But people do not seem to be able to seperate these two key componants when talking about manga in particular. ‘manga’ includes both these componants but they should be addressed seperately when it comes to addressing quality of work. Hell the writer and artist may not be the same person!

I think a lot of the popularity of manga can be attributed to the freshness it brings to comics in terms of subject matter in comics to north america as well as the exoticness of the art and stories. The culture which developed it has very different attitudes than north americans on the subject of comics and comic content and it reflects that. Comics in asia are something everyone reads. Its not just for kids, its not childish, and its widely accepted. Its open season on subject matter, nothing is really truly taboo, whereas in north america, for years, comics were simply put ‘kids stuff’. With the exception of say more independant or specifically adult magazines ( Heavy Metal comes to mind ), but it wasn't accepted. Reading anything cept maybe the daily funnies, (which we ALL know how censored and generally bland they got because of everyone's ‘sensitivies’) reading comics was not generally an accepted adult pasttime. Even then, unless you are a big fan of superheroes, fantasy, Archie or like.. Casper, you probably weren't going to find much in the local bookstore.

Another interesting fact about north american comics is that they were, historically generally geared towards a male audience by male authors and artists. Yes, there were some female cartoonists ( more in the strip sense of syndicated newspaper style), but they not well known, and even less so on the actual ‘comic book’ format. When the comic industry began to die in the 1950s, women were the first to feel the axe. As sales dwindled and the Comic Code came into effect ( thank you Dr Fredric Wertham. Jerk), it just drove another nail in the coffin. Consolidation of lines followed, titles were dropped for survival, artists and authors were fired. People at that time also were introduced to radio and television, which were free, rather than the comic, which you had to pay for.

Japan on the other hand, while suffering the SAME PROBLEMS, took a totally different approch. Since TV and radio were not nearly as prevailent, japanese still turned to manga and comics as their escape. Manga producers UPPED their output, not reduced it, lowered their prices and started creating anthologies, which would lead to graphic novels that are so familiar today. The surge in production lead to the male artists moving up and away from ‘girls’ titles, which feed up space for female authors and artists who have since created a highly refined female oriented comic art form.

Manga now has a WHOLE GENRE that is highly developed and geared towards women often by female creators (Shôjo and Ladies Manga). Manga is very influential in getting women interested in drawing and reading comics by introducing them to a format and variety of subject matter that is interesting (and accessable!) to them. Granted the women's market is smaller than the male oriented manga market, but its there and its growing in North America.

You really don't see much from the north american side for females until the 1970s or so, and even then, its pretty much underground stuff, and we know how generally successful underground print comics are. In terms of the mainstream, lets face it. The unwashed masses think comic in the north american sense, they think of little boys reading spiderman comics in superman PJs.

There's obviously a lot more to it especially now with the webcomic. We see less distinction between male/female oriented comics and more of a blend of concept, and of course accessability makes it much easier to try out a lot wider variety, not only for artists, but readers as well, with little to no risk.

Manga has, like it or not, awakened a whole new audience to comics. They are learning that comics are not just for children and not just for little boys. But people tend to like what they know. They know the visual style of manga and they look for it. They are discovering “ Holy cow! comics ARE cool!” Sitting around ‘poo poo-ing’ on manga and anime for it simply being popular is rather looking a gift horse in the mouth. With the growing popularity of the graphic novel and the new, growing interest in comics that are not just for kids, coupled with the massive publicity power of the internet, the opportunities to hook eyeballs into your work have never been higher, even if you DON'T do manga.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:53AM
ShadowsMyst at 1:34PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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crap. it logged me out.. that last post was from me.

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last edited on July 14, 2011 3:32PM
ccs1989 at 4:50PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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Manga has, like it or not, awakened a whole new audience to comics. They are learning that comics are not just for children and not just for little boys.

Most of the manga I come across in book stores is stuff like “Zatch Bell” or “Yu-Gi-Oh”. At best you get Rurouni Kenshin and Hikaru No Go (which I enjoy greatly). But a good deal of manga is still geared toward the same young audience that older American comics were. In contrast, American comics gear towards older readers. I mean, the Japanese have yet to produce a comic with the same literary value as something like Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Maus, etc. I think the closest they may have gotten is something like Berserk…

But people tend to like what they know. They know the visual style of manga and they look for it. They are discovering “ Holy cow! comics ARE cool!” Sitting around ‘poo poo-ing’ on manga and anime for it simply being popular is rather looking a gift horse in the mouth. With the growing popularity of the graphic novel and the new, growing interest in comics that are not just for kids, coupled with the massive publicity power of the internet, the opportunities to hook eyeballs into your work have never been higher, even if you DON'T do manga.

Eh…I dunno. A lot of manga styles seem really boring these days. Some creators are pushing towards a more refined look that is less easy to copy, but most stick with that mainstream, almost-animation house style. I don't know, but unless I enjoy the story a lot that kind of style doesn't catch my interest. “They know the visual style of manga and they look for it” implies a universal trait of manga art which ties it together. If everyone's style is that similar…it just gets boring.

But I still like a lot of manga. I get Shonen Jump in the mail and I own more manga than American comics (price is a factor) but I'm gaining more respect for American comics over a lot of manga.
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“If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.”
-Henry David Thoreau, Walden
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:37AM
Black_Kitty at 5:07PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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ccs1989
Most of the manga I come across in book stores is stuff like “Zatch Bell” or “Yu-Gi-Oh”. At best you get Rurouni Kenshin and Hikaru No Go (which I enjoy greatly). But a good deal of manga is still geared toward the same young audience that older American comics were. In contrast, American comics gear towards older readers. I mean, the Japanese have yet to produce a comic with the same literary value as something like Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Maus, etc. I think the closest they may have gotten is something like Berserk…

I'm not sure if that's completely true primarily because what manga we do find in North America depends greatly on what's picked up and distributed by Western companies. So if Western companies decide that what sells is comics geared towards a younger audience, then that's what you're going to find here. (Or at least in larger quantities.)

Besides, if the closest they've gotten was Berserk, what does that make Nausicaä? :S

.: Black Kitty :.
  
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
ccs1989 at 6:38PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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Nausicaa bored the hell out of me, but Berserk was only an example. However I don't think Japan has so far come out with any real stand alone work that surpasses any previous expectations in the way that some American comics have.

Of course I'm saying this through a rather thick bias, mainly because I, well…live in America! So if anyone who is Japanese wants to punch me in the stomach (figurativly!) with a counter arguement go for it! Or anyone with more knowledge on the subject for that matter.
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“If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.”
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:37AM
Black_Kitty at 8:37PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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To be honest, I have trouble naming some myself primarily because I don't read THAT much manga and I don't know Japanese. However, I find it hard to believe that nobody in Japan came out with a comic that has the same literary value as Maus. That's similar to me suggesting that nobody in Canada came out with any book that has the same literary value as George Orwell.

Because in the end, it's all storytelling and the Western world doesn't have a monopoly on talented storytellers. Neither do they have a monopoly on good cartoonists.

.: Black Kitty :.
  
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
mykill at 9:48PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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'I saw it' was a manga about hiroshima, I forget the author, but he's way famous in Japan. Very powerful and disturbing work, definitly on a level with maus.

That said, I will condemn commercial imitation of the ‘most popular’ for intentionally blurring the line between ‘cute’ and child like and ‘erotic’. Pedephilia is a bad thing!
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:09PM
Hawk at 10:12PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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You know what manga I really enjoyed? They called it “Uzumaki”. It may have been “Spiral into Uzumaki” in the States. I don't know. But it avoided the large-eyes stereotype and certainly didn't aim at children.

It was a bizarre horror story that showed the process of a particular town being destroy by spiral patterns in some of the most creative ways. And I appreciate it for not trying to be like something else or mindlessly tap into a demographic to get cash. It simply told a story and did it well.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:45PM
Black_Kitty at 11:34PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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Jen_Babcock
You know what's cool?

In New York, MOMA had an exhibition on Studio Ghibli and Miyazaki.

And I completely forgot to visit it when I was there. ;_;

.: Black Kitty :.
  
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
Black_Kitty at 11:42PM, Jan. 12, 2006
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Well you should come back right now b/c they're doing an exhibit on Pixar.

…I was. ;_; Well, sort of. I was at New Jersey last week and my relatives drove me over to NYC for one day.

Well, while I'm at it, I would just like to say that MOMA is a fantastic museum. In fact, New York has a lot of great museums and I'm still not sure how I'm suppose to go to the museums here now after being in New York ones.

.: Black Kitty :.
  
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
isukun at 8:00AM, Jan. 13, 2006
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'I saw it' was a manga about hiroshima, I forget the author, but he's way famous in Japan. Very powerful and disturbing work, definitly on a level with maus.

Keiji Nakazawa. He later lengthened it into a manga series called Barefoot Gen which was also made into an anime.

In contrast, American comics gear towards older readers. I mean, the Japanese have yet to produce a comic with the same literary value as something like Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Maus, etc. I think the closest they may have gotten is something like Berserk…

Most American comics still shoot for the teen audiences. You hear more about the standout comics simply because they do stand out for being different. American comics can be just as formulaic and are often moreso than what the Japanese are producing. American comics like to build on established characters and storylines, while Japanese comics focus more on storylines with a definite ending. Unfortunately, what American audiences seem to want is something to fill in the void left behind by the dwindling American comics market, so we get mostly mangas aimed at kids, which tend to be more formulaic and generic. When I was a kid, there were all sorts of comics aimed at younger readers based on toy franchises and cartoons. Today it's easier and often cheaper to just bring over the mangas that inspired the imported anime series kids watch on TV.

The standout manga series are often overlooked in favor of more commercially sound kid's fare. Most adult manga and anime (i.e. not the pornographic sorts) never make it to the US. Some fan favorites like the works of Otomo may make the trip, but more experimental stuff is often overlooked as a risk by importers. Instead, the older anime fans in the US often get hooked on series aimed at otaku in Japan. Once again, these run a bit more formulaic because they are simply catering to particular interests within a small group of people in order to push a product.

What makes it to the US is primarily commerical manga and animation, which makes sense considering that the import companies are also in this to make money. There is a market for experimental and independent comics in Japan, but it rarely, if ever, makes its way over here, just as I wouldn't assume Watchmen, V for Vendetta, or Maus are household names in Japan.

.: isukun :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
Aurora Moon at 11:48PM, Jan. 13, 2006
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ccs1989
Most of the manga I come across in book stores is stuff like “Zatch Bell” or “Yu-Gi-Oh”. At best you get Rurouni Kenshin and Hikaru No Go (which I enjoy greatly). But a good deal of manga is still geared toward the same young audience that older American comics were. In contrast, American comics gear towards older readers. I mean, the Japanese have yet to produce a comic with the same literary value as something like Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Maus, etc. I think the closest they may have gotten is something like Berserk…

Then whereever you are, they arent selling all the adult mangas then. :-\

you should really try to get the petshop of horrors series..

All about this cop looking into the mysterious Count D's strange petshop, where no animal seems to be orinday at all.

It's a manga that also deals with a lot of disturbing issues, such as a drug addict for a daughter getting her drugs from her own mother…
a serial killer on the lose, that kinda thing. I don't really want to give way too much about the petshop of horrors.

of course that series would be more for mature teenagers but still.

You should also read FAKE.
If you can get over the two main MALE cop characters lusting for each other (which I enjoy anyway, but others might not), then you can enjoy the story itself… going after mafia bosses, solving murders… it's all quite intersting.

There's Banana Fish, which deals with the mafia and gangs from the other side. instead of focusing on cops going after them, you get the story of young teenagers in gangs trying to make it big or trying to make a life for themselves.

you also got this young reportor's assiasant going undercover to get the story of those young gang members, finding himself sucked into the world of mafias and gangs more than he intended himself to be.

I've also got the Ghost in the shell manga, which is also excellent and hardly for children and teens with some of the VERY graphic sex scenes they have in there, along with the gore. they actually have some colored pages in there too!!
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:09AM
SarahN at 12:26AM, Jan. 14, 2006
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….anyone know any good vampire print comics? :? Besides Hellsing I mean…manga or otherwise.

As for good manga…don't forget Battle Angel Alita/Gunnm damnit! Though I haven't checked out the “Last Order” series yet.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:22PM
Aurora Moon at 1:38PM, Jan. 14, 2006
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well, there's “model” the manga, it's about this girl who's being seduced by this male model that turns out to be a vampire. :?

I only read it briefly while I was browsing in the bookstore, so I don't know if it's any good. there was a lot of blood and glamour shots in there though. :lol:

I'm pretty sure there was more vampire stuff out there, but I can't just think of them at the moment…
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:09AM
ShadowsMyst at 5:48PM, Jan. 14, 2006
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joined: 1-9-2006
SarahN
….anyone know any good vampire print comics? :? Besides Hellsing I mean…manga or otherwise.

Crimson was an excellent vampire series put out by Cliffhanger comics a while back. You can order the graphic novels still I think. I personally recommend it to any vampire fan. the art is gorgeous too.

http://www.gottawiz.com/Comics/DC/Crimson/TPB_1.htm

A pretty extensive list of american comics can be found here:
http://forum.darkness.com/index.php?showtopic=34283

As for manga.. heh, well there is tons out there besides Hellsing like:
Rebirth
Vampire Game
Vampire Princess Miyu
Vampire Hunter D
Lament of the Lamb
Kimera
Trinity Blood
Descendants of Darkness
Blood: The last vampire
Chibi Vampire
NightWalkers
DarkStalkers
Master of Mosquiton
Model
Tsukuyomi: Moon Phase

I'm sure they are more. They vary from serious to down right campy, so choose your flavor.

_____________________________________________________
I have a webcomic making blog! Check it out.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:32PM
Ronin at 3:10AM, Jan. 15, 2006
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posts: 21
joined: 1-3-2006


Yoshitaka Amano owns you. ^.~
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:10PM

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