Debate and Discussion

Aspies in the house?
ozoneocean at 1:41AM, Oct. 20, 2008
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Yes, I didn't think you'd need drugs for that sort of thing, it's really pretty strange to suggest, unless your problems went beyond something simple like Aspergers into something more ugly and difficult. The best sorts of medical treatment for your problems would likely be something more general, things that relax you and make it easier to concentrate when it's needed.
It's dangerous and irresponsible to prescribe Antipsychotics for conditions they were never developed or even trailed for… But you'll find people doing that anyway, most usually in the U.S. That alone tells you there's some problems with the industry.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
KingRidley at 7:12AM, Oct. 20, 2008
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I just feel that alot of conditions can get by without medicine (such as my ADD where I have gone for years without taking any pills), but sometimes they still need it. In most cases therapy can only get you so far.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:16PM
TheMidge28 at 7:17AM, Oct. 20, 2008
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Faliat
Ah, but what drugs company would succeed in creating a drug that's for a condition/disorder/difference that nobody really knows much about?

Many and all drug companies would succeed in creating a drug for a condition/disorder/difference that the populace currently is not aware of. Marketing has to start some where.

If you meant what would a drug company gain… that's pretty obvious.

last edited on July 14, 2011 4:25PM
Starbraces at 8:59AM, Oct. 20, 2008
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I would never refer to myself as an “Aspie”, but yes I was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome 5 years ago when I was 15. Before that there were no shrinks who could diagnose it, so between 12 and 15 I literally lived in a mental hospital because they didn't know what was wrong with me

But I take medication now, and I do feel much better (aside from severe OCD) =D
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:57PM
Faliat at 9:56AM, Oct. 20, 2008
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ozoneocean
Yes, I didn't think you'd need drugs for that sort of thing, it's really pretty strange to suggest, unless your problems went beyond something simple like Aspergers into something more ugly and difficult.
It was. I was hearing voices for a while and then I got a strong desire one day to grind my hand into broken glass to make an excuse for being late for college among other things. Like with many other issues regarding concerns I have my parents thought it was nothing major and that I was just overreacting. A common aspie trait, though not every person diagnosed with A.S. has it (Some actually have the extreme opposite), is an increased sensitivity to pain or a tendency to overreact to illnesses. Or so people think.

I sometimes get distressed from people lightly grabbing my arm or tapping my shoulder because some kind of sensation overload occurs and my brain starts setting off panic signals that are interpreted as pain. It's very irritating when somebody is trying to get your attention through those methods and I end up going “OW!”, then they ask me if that hurts and for some reason end up doing it again to see if it does. And it doesn't. But I still feel uncomfortable and end up avoiding it.
As a result people think I have a low pain threshhold when I actually don't.
I once stapled through my own finger as a test when I was eight and I actually laughed because I found it so amusing and fascinating yanking it back out again and watching the blood come out. And there's been times when people are more concerned about my illnesses and injuries than me. It's just that my parents are never around to see that and make generalisations instead. And because I live in an area where access to a local health centre is quite a bus ride or walk away, and even further away to an A+E ward, I have to always convince my parents of every concerning injury or sickness being serious enough to see a doctor about. I still live with them because even right now I'm not socially capable or physically able to cope with living on my own in their opinion.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
Starbraces at 12:21PM, Oct. 20, 2008
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Asperger often comes with so called “parasites”, which need to be medicated

My parasites are severe OCD and full-fledged panic attacks (created from nothing). I take medication to ease it up a little (SSRI, long time working). Asperger comes in so many forms, from being unable to communicate with people… to just being a bit “off” (for a lack of better words)

I've met several with Asperger, some of them who are paranoid and unable to have contact with people on a regular basis. And then those like me who suffer mostly from parasitic problems, but other than that manage to live a normal life (even though things like going shopping, ride the train et.c can be very uncomfortable, as well as loud noises …especially for me)

And like Faliat said, it's not uncommon to feel pain from having someone touch you - to showering or even having CLOTHES on. Anything can feel restrictive and uncomfortable. It's like having hightened sensations from ALL 5 senses

The one sense that troubles me the most is loud noises. Because of this I don't listen to music and I can't vaccuum clean on my own
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:57PM
Faliat at 6:38AM, Oct. 23, 2008
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Actually, there are more than five senses. So many that it's difficult to count them all, but Asperger's has a way of affecting the basic senses as well as many others.

Sight can very often be sensitive to light.

Hearing is often sensitive to loud or high pitched noises

Taste is generally weakened in some apies. Causing them to prefer to eat stronger tasting foods.

Smell is very acute. Even hours after spraying perfume and it's mostly diffused into the atmosphere, someone with A.S. will still be able to smell it.

Touch is often extremely sensitive. Even in those individuals with dulled sensation to pain.

Balance and Proprioception (Sensing the location of your body parts) is usually poor. (Why most with Asperger's to become clumsy.) There's times when I've been running and I fall over because I can't tell just how far I'm leaning over and where I'm putting my legs. However when I focus on slight movements I'm capable of balance better than others without it. One time I shocked myself by being able to jump-dance along a kerb on the way home from the local Shopping Centre. I trip up over my own feet regularly but that was incredibly easy. I tried it again recently and nearly broke my neck (exaggerated).

Temperature perception is off. It's common for Aspies to be seen wearing thick clothes and jackets in summer and very thin clothing and no jackets in winter. I wear the same combination of winter and summer clothing all year round. But that's also somewhat to do with my sensitivity to clothing fabrics.

Pain sensation can either be very sensitive, resulting in a slight graze feeling like your whole limb has been taken off, or very dull. Your arm could be broken and it would only sting a little bit.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
ozoneocean at 8:02AM, Oct. 23, 2008
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You have to be careful here…
If you did a good survey of any group of people you're going to come up with things like that- there'll be ones very sensitive to some things and others not at all to others; Many people that wouldn't dream of describing themselves as having any sort of disorder will have exactly these sensitivities and reactions you describe.
I'm sure it's in the literature too (what you say), or some literature somewhere, I don't think this is just anecdotal, but you'll find that these sorts of claims tend to change as people find out what's really going on. -The more they discover about a condition…

Starbraces comments are quite interesting in that she talks about the condition coming in many forms and many of her examples sound quite similar to schizophrenia (especially coming in many forms) except the cause seems often sensory distortion rather than originating in the mind.
One tends to think though that perhaps there is some crossover of diagnoses occasionally? Perhaps the one is really the other, sometimes? ;)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
Faliat at 7:13PM, Oct. 28, 2008
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I DID type up a larger reply, but Vista restarted on me and I didn't have time to make a copy of what I already wrote.

But anyway, part of it was like this:

Yes, there is a lot variety in it's traits, but those are down to the individual with it. Being at a college course specific for those either diagnosed or being tested for Asperger's or High Functioning Autism for two years, I've seen a lot of different behaviours. But there are patterns. If there wasn't they'd all be classed as different issues.

There are also a lot of other similarities and common occurances. However, due to there being so few people researching this, there are even less people seeing these similarities I've seen. So I'm trying to do them myself without proper scientific backing. But if I hit something I'll be trying to contact professionals to see if they can do it for real.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
Bimbo_Zombie at 6:30PM, Nov. 19, 2008
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As an Aspie I have to say…
My god! The people on Gaia know more about this disorder than you do! GAIA! The website that only has one member that can actually read! Including mods!!

And yes it IS a real disorder. I have met people with VERY sever cases of it, so no it is not another ‘fake disorder’.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:22AM
Faliat at 10:55PM, Nov. 24, 2008
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Bimbo_Zombie
As an Aspie I have to say…
My god! The people on Gaia know more about this disorder than you do! GAIA! The website that only has one member that can actually read! Including mods!!
And that, ladies and gentlemen, is one of the main problems with A.S.

It's like air, bacteria and the back of your own head. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it's not there. And if you can't see it there's usually ways of finding out whether it's there or not. And what it is.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
ozoneocean at 11:46PM, Nov. 24, 2008
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Look, I can express myself better than you guys, so I use that unfair advantage to bully away and marginalise what you say- to fit in with my prejudices. :)
That's the beauty of this thread.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
Faliat at 10:58PM, Dec. 10, 2008
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Not exactly a suitable reply for a debate and discussion thread, don't you think?

(I know this bit took a while to remember, but it got deleted from my uber long post that was swiped by a restart.)
|
V

Difference between my opinions and yours is the fact that I can still understand several logical origins of why people think AS doesn't exist, is being misdiagnosed, etc.
There's almost no chance in hell you'll get where I'm coming from unless you probably see somebody deliberately portray High-Fuctioning Asperger's in a fictional medium and manage to pull it off for once. Or by chance you happen to become emotionally close with someone that has a diagnosis. Or maybe even get to hear a non-stop rambling session by someone with it about it that you can't get away from? I dunno. But I can tell from a mile off that you probably wouldn't bother anyway.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
ozoneocean at 11:26PM, Dec. 10, 2008
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I was simply characterising myself in reference to this debate and its participants in a way that amused me. ;)

The difference between you and I is that your starting point is that Aspergers has a great deal of significance and personal reality to you, while to me it has none of that resonance. :)

You could say that from my standpoint: "I can understand several logical origins for the reasons why people think Aspergers Syndrome does exist, is being diagnosed etc."
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 3:09PM, Dec. 11, 2008
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really amuses me to see people quote wikipedia for the symptoms about this rather than just checking the DSM (which is online) as well as contacting a mental health professional instead of dismissing them all.

Usually people who dismiss a profession don't understand that profession.

As for Einstein having Asberger's, yes Einstein had great difficulty in general socialization as opposed to socialization with his peers. He became famous because as a scientist; he published his findings. They passed peer review and were so revolutionary that he was sought out as the physicist not a guy to ask to cocktail parties. Einstein's wife (IIRC also his daughter) was the one who took care of his socialization and networking. I have to read that new biography of him. Many scientists admit having the symptoms of various disorders including Asberger's.

As for Newton, well, he was an arrogant know-it-all son-of-a-bitch. He was the smartest guy in the room, he knew it and made sure you did too.

Do you want a list of how many renowed folks have certain diagnoses of depression and anxiety?
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 3:24PM, Dec. 11, 2008
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The Einstein thing is nothing more or less than optimistic revisionism In reference to someone's pet cause. Bravo, Surely you've seen that happen with every single historical figure that's ever been written about, with many different contradictory problems. That you'd support the legitimacy of this claim makes me a little dubious about you…

Even the claim that his daughter and wife socialised for him… When other accounts suggest he was a friendly chap who enjoid carousing with his friends, as well as a little bit of womanising. Historical figures are prone to… Interpretation. Which is whay it's a stupid idea to use them as examples of pet problems. ;)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 4:00PM, Dec. 11, 2008
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lol!

Nah. If you write up biography as an objective case study and show it to a mental health care professional and include samples of their writing, diaries etc… why can't you make a possible diagnosis? It seems at times that you question the possiblity of gnosisabout anything. ;)


I just go with burden of evidence. The simplest answer is the best answer and usually the right one. So I accept the possiblity of Einstein having Asberger's, but he probably didn't because it's not the simplest answer.

So I can't claim anything with those who ever suffered melancholia even though the pathology is identical? That's not some re-interpretation, it's objective observation. But there is no objectivity because it is all relative because of our own interpretations therefore nothing is. No knowledge is possible? :)

No wonder so many people have suffered from severe depression. Am I safe in saying that Lincoln and Grant had severe depression? Am I reading my own illness into them even though everything they wrote indicates identical thought processes and perceptions as defined in the DSM as the diagnosis that I have?
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 5:37PM, Dec. 11, 2008
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It's not objective. That's exactly what it is NOT. lol!
Which is why these things are always so funny. “Objective case Study”. Now that is amusing. Objectivity is a dream, it's something you can strive for and fake convincingly when the subject is close in time, but the further back you go, the harder that becomes.
I've heard a lot of interesting things about Julius Ceaser…

Knowledge is possible. The awareness of the relativity (hohoho) of facts doesn't change this. We just have to realise that these things shift, they're not constant and immovable.

With Ulysses Grant and Abraham Lincoln, are you allowing for current cultural attitudinises towards those conditions and their symptoms and the way that influences people's interpretations of them?

———————
In the end, historical interpretation is an exercise in diversion… entertainment. Enlightenment is unlikely. Which is why using those sorts of things in arguments is problematic.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
theorah at 10:34AM, Jan. 23, 2009
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wow, I'm really surprised at the amount of people who dont think this is a real disorder/does any harm to people? 0_0 I guess the general public is more unknowlegable on this kind of thing then I thought ^^;
I have quite a few friends with aspergers (when you go to art college you just naturally attract unusual people ;) ) and speaking from experience it really is something that can affect you abdly and stop you from enjoying life. One of my friends has very severe aspergers, he abrely eats anything, he cant go on buses or trains for long amounts of time, he doesnt sleep much either. Unless you tell him in advance where hes going to go and what have you, he gets really stressed out. Another one of my friends only has mild aspergers, but it has still affected her very much. She got extremly bullied at school (like physically bullied) because she found it hard to read emotions/talk to people. In both of them it isnt noticable that they have any kind of disorder, but it has made them unhappy in the past.

The problem I think with any kind of mental illness, is that when you read the diagnosis on the internet, they all seem like pretty normal features/problems that any normal healthy person might have every now and then. I guess thats why people either become skepticle or they suddenly think they might have something like this themselves. The thing is, you get diagnosed with these things so that you can get help afterwards. This means you have to really be in some kind of distress/trouble in the first place….
So, for anyone who is skeptical of this kind of thing, ignore those attention seekers who like to pretend they have something. When you read the symptoms of these things on the internet, think of them at there most extreme, where they could seriously harm someone/stop someone from leading a happy life.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:25PM

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