Debate and Discussion

Books that are challenged or banned for stupid reasons.
Aurora Moon at 10:19AM, Nov. 6, 2010
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Every year, an group of approximately 408 people across the nation gets together and decides what or which books are going to get banned from schools, or at least Challenged.

here's a list of the most challenged or banned books.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most-commonly_challenged_books_in_the_United_States

Read though that list and tell me which ones you think shouldn't have been challenged in the first place.

Here is my list of books that should not had been Challenged or banned in the first place, in no real order:

1. “Blubber”. This book by Judy blume was all about self-image and Bullying in schools. It never supported bullying at all, and in fact was actually very Anti-bullying. It actually dealt with things in a very realistic way, espeically the consequences of becoming one of the people who bullied others just so you could fit in.
I remember reading this in literate class and the teacher actually had us hold a whole discussion about what we would had done in that situation, and about how well we treated each other.
It was a very nice way to get kids to think about the impact that their behavior had on others.

However…. Apparently in the last years it has been challenged, and a few schools even attempted to ban it because some people missed the point of the book. They didn't want a book that dealt with the topic of bullying in their school, fearing that it would be “hurtful” to the kids' viewpoints.


2. “Tiger Eyes”.
Is it me, or does Judy Blume books get challenged and or banned often, usually for small stupid, trivial reasons??
This story is all about a teenage girl who was learning how to cope with the death of her father. Her father was murdered because of a shoot-out at a 7-11. This isn't even described in great detail… this scene literally has only two lines in the whole book.
The mom decides they all need a new change in scenery, because their home holds too many memories for them all. so they go to live with their aunt and uncle in Arizona, where the teenage girl meets this cute boy, and feels herself slowly falling for him. They bond over their losses and grief, and over time The teenage girl feels that while she still feels the loss of her father, that things are going to be okay.

Since this book talks about the loss of loved ones, grief and how to deal with it the powers that be decided that it was “too depressing” or something for Teens to read so they tried to get this book banned.

3.“The Face on the Milk Carton” — Yet another book I read when I was a kid. I was surprised that people found this to be objectionable. The reasons for challenging or banning this is rather mysterious.

It is a book about Janie Johnson, a 15-year-old high school student in Connecticut. One day at lunch she looks at the missing child picture on her friend's milk carton and recognizes the girl in the picture — it is her. The milk carton says the girl, Jennie Spring, was kidnapped in a shopping mall in New Jersey 12 years ago. That afternoon, Janie begins to have flashbacks of a house and a family and herself as a little girl. Her memory from the day of the kidnapping is of herself and a family shoe shopping. She became angry and stormed off, and a woman bought her an ice cream and took her for a ride. However, she didn't know who this woman was. She couldn't believe that the people she thought of as her parents could have kidnapped her, but she couldn't come up with any other explanation.

This book had no sexual themes, and no abuse at all.
The kid basically had the best situation that could actually happen to her, considering what really happens to kids in real life when they're kidnapped. She was treated well, etc. And overall everyone in the book agreed that the kidnapping was a bad thing to happen, despite the fact that she had been treated well.
So it's kind of mysterious why people found this book objectionable?

4. The Witches (book)– It's all about nasty ugly witches who band together to turn all the children of the world into mice. Simply just because they hate children so much!
One heroic boy, who got turned into a mouse then plans to stop them and expose them for who they really are.

It's just a fun, quirky child's book that talks about highly stereotypical Halloween-like witches, and does not portray witchcraft as something cool or desirable at all.

So when people called out for it to be banned on the ground that it “promoted” witchcraft, My reaction was pretty much like this: “LOL WHAT??”

I read the book and watched the movie when I was a little girl…. I don't remember seeing anything in there that “promoted witchcraft”. It was just a fun Halloween story.

5. “The Wish Giver: Three Tales of Coven Tree” is a 1983 book by Bill Brittain.

The “wish giver” in the title refers to the enigmatic man who gives three children a wish to make their deepest dreams come true. However, in typical Faust fashion, the wishes are not worded carefully, and go horribly awry.

Throughout the book, the children who makes the wishes learn that it's better to work for the things they want to have, instead of having everything handed to them.
Because having everything handed to them sometimes end up with serious consequences.

Again, not quite sure why they wanted this book banned… probably because of the elements of the supernatural in the book?

6. A wrinkle in time– An scifi story that has an highly spiritual theme throughout it. It's just a fun, bizarre adventure where the kids find their missing scientist father.

It has a lot of Christian themes in it, which is probably why it got challenged or tried to get it banned.

Despite my beliefs about organized religion in general, I feel that the christian themes running throughout the book did not detract from what was a wonderful work.
They did not preach about God at all in the book… it was just there, but not obnoxiously so. Anybody of a different religion, or even an Atheist, could still enjoy this work immensely. I know I do.

So it shouldn't had been challenged at all.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:11AM
Hawk at 12:44PM, Nov. 6, 2010
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They challenged A Wrinkle in Time? That was one of my favorites as a kid. I didn't even notice any Christian undertones.

I think some people are just busybodies, concerning themselves too much with the welfare of other peoples' children. They're the overly vocal people at the PTA meetings. They're the parents who work to take specific field trips, curriculums, and learning resources away from everyone, and apparently the ones who try to decide the literature options for ALL children.

I know there are definitely some books that don't belong in school libraries. But it sounds like some of those ones mentioned shouldn't be challenged.

However, I wondered if I wasn't getting the whole picture here so I investigated one of those books, Blubber… at least I read a pretty detailed synopsis. (Now keep in mind, I'm not trying to justify the book's banning, just understand it) Maybe part of the banning wasn't about bullying, but the fact that it might give overweight girls image issues. There's also the fact that the chief bully in the story ends up unpunished and the overweight girl is still friendless in the end. Of course I'm viewing these events out of context and am unaware of the way Judy Blume presents them. The fact that your classroom was able to have a good discussion over the book tells me it was still beneficial and worthy of being in a school library.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:47PM
Abt_Nihil at 1:09PM, Nov. 6, 2010
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“The Witches” was probably challenged for the same reasons Harry Potter was - and these are obviously ridiculous reasons. Anyone challenging Roald Dahl could as well just go and slap a stupid tag on their forehead.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:44AM
Aurora Moon at 2:30PM, Nov. 6, 2010
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However, I wondered if I wasn't getting the whole picture here so I investigated one of those books, Blubber… at least I read a pretty detailed synopsis. (Now keep in mind, I'm not trying to justify the book's banning, just understand it) Maybe part of the banning wasn't about bullying, but the fact that it might give overweight girls image issues. There's also the fact that the chief bully in the story ends up unpunished and the overweight girl is still friendless in the end. Of course I'm viewing these events out of context and am unaware of the way Judy Blume presents them. The fact that your classroom was able to have a good discussion over the book tells me it was still beneficial and worthy of being in a school library.

detailed Summaries still doesn't really present the context of such situations in the books very well, as you rightfully pointed out.

The ringleader who led the class in bullying the fat girl didn't get punished for it by adults. So you're right on that part.

However the other Classmates themselves did start to realize that picking on some random person just for the shits ‘n’ giggles wasn't such a good thing after all. Especially when one of the main offenders (Jill) got a taste of her own medicine and became reformed as an result. Jill then points out to everyone how stupid and pointless the whole thing was, how bullying had no true goals only expect to hurt everyone.

So the ringleader basically lost most of her power over the whole class as an result of that… everyone then started to ignore her whenever she tried to get them to target somebody for bullying.

Personally, I think it reflects real life very well. Not everything can have a Hollywood ending or a fairytale ending where it's done with a moral to it.

In Real life, Teachers or other adults doesn't even TRY to do anything when they see this kind of shit going on. Most of the time they just turn their backs on the whole thing, usually out of fear of the bully or simply because they didn't care enough to get involved.
If they had Wendy in their classroom, they wouldn't had punished her neither.

It's usually left up to the kids to try to deal with this sort of thing on their own… and just like in the story, the dynamics of relationships often change too… sometimes the bullied ends up being the bully too, just like Linda did when the tables were turned.

it's supposed to be REALISTIC, and it's also supposed to be a story to get people thinking about the effect that their own actions might have on others.

Yes, a lot of the content could be seen as hurtful to anybody with self-image problems, but that's just how it is. It's tacking the topic of bullying– if the writer sugarcoated anything the impact would had been lost.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:11AM
itsjustaar at 3:13AM, Dec. 9, 2010
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Some of the books listed are known movies that have wound up to become fairly well-known movies. It's kind of a downer that they'd challenge the source material, considering the source material may very well be a very good read, depending on the reader's opinion. Some of these I'm kinda surprised…

'Goosebumps' was always a personal favorite of mine. I can see it as being scary, but compared to the repeated amounts of gorey good fun horror movies are out there, it's ridiculously tame by comparison.

I think another reason these things get challenged is public fear.

What's to be scared about by turning kids into little versions of cartoon mice though or whatever reason ‘The Witches’ got challenged for amuses me a lot.
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DAJB at 12:23AM, Dec. 10, 2010
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Oh wow. Quite a few of my favourites on that list!

1984
Catch 22
Huckleberry Finn

to name but three!

last edited on July 14, 2011 12:04PM
itsjustaar at 12:35AM, Dec. 10, 2010
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I wondered that too! D: Almost all of my favorites are in there, or I at least read a few times in school.

How ‘The Dead Zone’ got there remains a mystery to me. I love Stephen King.
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Aurora Moon at 1:59AM, Dec. 10, 2010
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kind of gives you the feeling that they're banning every fun and enjoyable book from school doesn't it?
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:11AM
blindsk at 12:23PM, Dec. 10, 2010
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I always found the fact that any books involving “witchcraft” hit this list quite often to be very amusing. Apparently we're still living in colonial times.

Oh, and the fact that 1984 is on there allows us to expose this for the conspiracy that it is. ;)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:25AM
itsjustaar at 2:56PM, Dec. 10, 2010
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*hums the X-Files theme*

They don't want us to read 1984 because it may very well be more accurate than we realize. >_O

I can see where the religious-based books might cause somewhat of a commotion, particularly with everyone's debate and different orientation on the matter. But some, whether it's because the book took place during the 1800's and involved slavery or something - or then you've got witchcraft, it's just like… “C'mon guys, get over it.”

Somehow I really doubt the Harry Potter books are gonna inspire me or my little cousins to go out and attempt hocus pocus. I figure most folks are smart enough not to do that, lol. Pranks, maybe, but nothing serious.
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PPPchairman at 7:44AM, Dec. 13, 2010
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Personally I think the only books that should be banned, nay massed burned should be the Twilight series. Not because of any subject material but only because of the insane of amount crazy it realeses into girls of all ages.

itsjustaar
I can see where the religious-based books might cause somewhat of a commotion, particularly with everyone's debate and different orientation on the matter.

If a parent doesnt want kids to read certain religous subject material then it should be that individual parent's decision for that individual child and their responsibility to skim over books for that kind of stuff before the kid reads it.

last edited on July 14, 2011 2:47PM
ayesinback at 8:25AM, Dec. 13, 2010
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I can't think of any occasion that I would endorse book burning, other than a situation where it was freezing and if you didn't have a fire you would lose digits from frost bite and there was no other fuel with which to start and maintain a fire.

As far as banning books, I support private organizations having their own guidelines, but I do not support an active ban by public organizations, like libraries and schools.

I do want, however, warnings about adult situations in books that could be inappropriate for young readers. And when I say adult, I don't restrict that term to coarse language, sex, and/or violence. Many kids musto mature before they can explore the inequities of the real-world as reflected in literature, and since kids mature at different rates, parents need to weigh in on what is and is not suitable for their child at a given time.

For example, my son's school provided a summer reading list and by luck of the draw he chose a title that portrayed some troubled characters: an abusive father, a kid who liked to drown kittens, an alcoholic mother. There was no synopsis, no warning, and he struggled with some ideas he just wasn't ready for, but stuck it out because he felt he had to complete the assignment. It wasn't until after he read the book that he told me about it, and years later he still talks about it. The sadness and unfairness were shocking to him.

The book itself was not bad, and certainly shouldn't be banned. But at that time, my son wasn't ready for it, and it should have come with a summary that indicated the adult concepts so we would have had an informed choice. Please don't tell me I should have read it first because (a) yes, I should have and (b) the amount of previewing that is expected of parents would prevent me from getting to too many of the other things I just have to get done.

One last note: In reality, given the vast amount of reading material available compared to the relatively tiny spending budgets, there has always been a de facto banning if not philosophical until the internet came along. Which is why I support an utterly free internet with no government restriction, as long individual households can restrict as they deem necessary.
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Aurora Moon at 8:44AM, Dec. 13, 2010
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Well said. and with the Advent of E-books, the possibilities are endless along with the internet.

of course it's nothing like actually holding a real book in your hands but it's still a pretty good alternative.
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Kahlan_Brightblade at 10:03AM, Dec. 13, 2010
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I can't believe a classic book like Call of the wild was challenged or Banned. However I can see how Cujo was banned, the theme of a dog killing people is definetly something kids shouldn't read. I'm not suprised Christine by Stephen King was too, a lot of what Stephen king write isn't appropriate for kids. Its scary , heck it even still scares me sometimes.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:13PM
itsjustaar at 3:10PM, Dec. 13, 2010
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Personally I think the only books that should be banned, nay massed burned should be the Twilight series. Not because of any subject material but only because of the insane of amount crazy it realeses into girls of all ages.

itsjustaar
I can see where the religious-based books might cause somewhat of a commotion, particularly with everyone's debate and different orientation on the matter.

If a parent doesnt want kids to read certain religous subject material then it should be that individual parent's decision for that individual child and their responsibility to skim over books for that kind of stuff before the kid reads it.

Hahaha, ‘Twilight’. xD I didn't think people still did book burnings, though; that's a bit much for a lot of these things… o_o; …but considering there was a lot of hype over Lennon's remark or what the Dixie Chicks did (and this is for music, too!), everyone issued immediate LP smashing over one misunderstanding or comment. I wouldn't be surprised. Pretty creepy to me, though.

I agree. Thing is though, with most parents (and I've been with a few) are lazy people. They'll usually let it go unnoticed until the kid in question makes a mistake, but rather than blame their shoddy parenting, they'll go the media. Either for fame, a quick buck, or whatever.
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ayesinback at 6:17AM, Dec. 14, 2010
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I agree. Thing is though, with most parents (and I've been with a few) are lazy people. They'll usually let it go unnoticed until the kid in question makes a mistake, but rather than blame their shoddy parenting, they'll go the media. Either for fame, a quick buck, or whatever.
Most parents are lazy? If you want to look at that by saying most People are lazy, perhaps.

Having a kid doesn't turn you into something else: tra la la, now you are lazy. Becoming a parent in essence means adding a LOT more to your life. In my experience, some of the parents I've most respected do not spend the hours reading every review of this video game, or that movie, and this book. Instead, they invest that time by spending it with their kids. Time is The premium. I suggest that “classics” are classics because parents do know about them and can trust them without needing to research them.

Growing up, some of the shoddiest parents I knew were those who were heavily involved with their Church youth groups or the PTA. They were so busy ensuring that books or outings, etc. were “suitable” that they didn't even know who their own kids were and what they were up to. But they weren't lazy - they could tell you what any book was about.
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ozoneocean at 7:27AM, Dec. 14, 2010
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Hahaha, I remember back in primary school (that would be “grade school” in the US) we had reading lists of certain kinds of books and my moronic teacher assigned me the most innocent and simple ones for my assignments because he felt those were “appropriate” for my level.
Meanwhile I was secretly borrowing out all the rest of the books on the reading list and reading them just for pleasure, as well as buying up a hefty lot from the second hand book fair and devouring the library. I learned a lot of interesting things about sex and violence on my own cognisance. ^_^

Kids should be able to find their own way through books, not be stunted because someone else is restricting their growth through misguided paternalism.
 
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ayesinback at 8:37AM, Dec. 14, 2010
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Kids should be able to find their own way through books, not be stunted because someone else is restricting their growth through misguided paternalism.

It's a world of “should”s and “should not”s, isn't it, but if there's one true generality, it's that there is no generality that fits all situations.

I have only two kids for my scientific study, and they are about as opposite as they can be. Over the years they have needed very different kinds of support. For kids who mature more slowly or who are more sensitive in certain areas, extra support would probably benefit them. But the identical support could become stifling for kids who don't have those needs. As much as possible, policy should be flexible enough to enable some tailoring for individual need.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:14AM
ozoneocean at 9:07AM, Dec. 14, 2010
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As much as possible, policy should be flexible enough to enable some tailoring for individual need.
Well in your case at least it's a parent making those decisions- someone who actually knows the children and not some uninvolved idiot who only sees them for an hour or two a day as in the case of the teacher I was talking about.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:37PM
itsjustaar at 11:58AM, Dec. 14, 2010
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In my experience, a ‘lazy’ parent in my definition usually let their children run rampant or free to go as they pleased. This happened a lot in some of the daycare providers I've been with, or in the homes of a few neighborhood. ‘Lazy’ might not be the best word to really describe it, but they certainly let the whole place go, and it looked like a mess - “If the kid's happy, good. My work's done here.” - the vibe of giving a kid the latest craze in books or movies, games, just to keep he or she quiet without looking it over. None of them looked much like PTA volunteer material, lol. xD Or attended church, that I know of.
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blindsk at 7:19PM, Jan. 5, 2011
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Aurora Moon
Well said. and with the Advent of E-books, the possibilities are endless along with the internet.

Besides the fact that holding it in your hands enhances the reading experience (a certain Star Trek quote comes to mind), one thing that would seriously bother me is if I were to recommend a book to a friend, I can't just hand them a physical copy itself so that they can borrow it. Instead, they'd have to take my word for it and download it themselves.

Anyway, something recently came up that seemed pertinent to this topic. Apparently Huck Finn will be republished by a professor as a whitewashed version replacing the ‘N’ word every time it appears in the book so as to “express that in the 21st Century.” He believes it's a legitimate effort to stop it from disappearing from school curriculum.

So apparently it's fine to tamper with renowned literature. I can't believe these school's allowed it to come to this.

last edited on July 14, 2011 11:25AM
DAJB at 11:23PM, Jan. 5, 2011
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Apparently Huck Finn will be republished by a professor as a whitewashed version replacing the ‘N’ word every time it appears in the book So apparently it's fine to tamper with renowned literature.
Yup. Apparently they're replacing the word “nigger” with the word “slave”. While the book is definitely anti-slavery, the whole question of race and ignorant prejudice is so inextricably linked with the slavery issue in Huckleberry Finn that this effectively neuters the book.

The only glimmer of hope I see coming from this particular act of censorship is that not one review I have read supports the move. Many have argued that this is akin to removing the word “Jew” from The Merchant of Venice, and even black reviewers have criticised it as a well-intentioned but misguided attempt to whitewash history.

No doubt we'll soon see expurgated versions of Lady Chatterley's Lover (with all the expletives removed for those who are offended by that kind of language), King Lear (with no references to “bastards” because children born out of wedlock are pretty much the norm in some schools) and 1984 (because, after all, describing the working class as “proles” is so demeaning)!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:04PM
BffSatan at 11:37PM, Jan. 5, 2011
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Aurora Moon
Read though that list and tell me which ones you think shouldn't have been challenged in the first place.
Uh…. all of them.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:21AM
bravo1102 at 6:44AM, Jan. 6, 2011
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You'd think these book banners would learn the lesson the Catholic Church learned so long ago. Want people to go out and read something? Put it on the list of banned books.

These days you don't have to go to the great lengths you used to to get a banned book. Five minutes on the computer and off goes the order to Amazon. Like you're gonna block Amazon? Good luck, why not try to keep the kids from going into any bookstore that doesn't have “Christian” in the title.

Let them read and explore and take out the time to explain it to them. Nah, keep them in a bubble and forget the past thus guranteeing that “Never Again!” becomes “Never Again?” and finally “Not again!”
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:34AM
Genejoke at 7:31AM, Jan. 6, 2011
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blindsk
Apparently Huck Finn will be republished by a professor as a whitewashed version replacing the ‘N’ word every time it appears in the book So apparently it's fine to tamper with renowned literature.
Yup. Apparently they're replacing the word “nigger” with the word “slave”. While the book is definitely anti-slavery, the whole question of race and ignorant prejudice is so inextricably linked with the slavery issue in Huckleberry Finn that this effectively neuters the book.

The only glimmer of hope I see coming from this particular act of censorship is that not one review I have read supports the move. Many have argued that this is akin to removing the word “Jew” from The Merchant of Venice, and even black reviewers have criticised it as a well-intentioned but misguided attempt to whitewash history.

No doubt we'll soon see expurgated versions of Lady Chatterley's Lover (with all the expletives removed for those who are offended by that kind of language), King Lear (with no references to “bastards” because children born out of wedlock are pretty much the norm in some schools) and 1984 (because, after all, describing the working class as “proles” is so demeaning)!

Pathetic isn't it, reading the word nigger isn't going to make me a racist. Typing it doesn't make me racist. Isn't slave more demeaning than nigger in some ways anyway? Are they gonna go back and edit the labrador out of the dam busters?
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mlai at 7:29PM, Jan. 7, 2011
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If I want to hear the word nigger I just have to listen to rap. Why change Mark Twain? Anyone who actually reads the book knows he's anti-slavery.

Insofar as book-banning, I think that's an outdated practice. Why ban books? Kids can get bestiality porn for free, or people getting decapitated (for real), or civilians and children getting machinegunned by American soldiers, just by surfing the web for 5 minutes, and they don't get any new vocabulary taught!

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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:07PM
AshenSkye at 8:38PM, Jan. 7, 2011
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The other change in Huck Finn is Injun Joe being renamed to Indian Joe. Which makes even less sense. It'd be like taking every hip hop and rap song made and changing “nigga” to “nigger” to “make it less offensive”. To who? English teachers?

History is history. We should learn from it. It doesn't have to be a modern reality but there's a good chance it will be again if there aren't little reminders for us to play nice with other people.

Although, going along with one thing ayesinback said, I do agree with little ratings or something on things that some people may take offense to or simply need to have a few more years added to their life before viewing. Self-censoring can be healthy. Mass-censoring can be destructive.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:02AM
Hawk at 11:13PM, Jan. 8, 2011
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It'd be like taking every hip hop and rap song made and changing “nigga” to “nigger” to “make it less offensive”. To who? English teachers?

This totally got a laugh out of me. :)
It's true!

It's funny how hard some people try to sanitize classic works where the racial slur was correct in its context at the time. Imagine the outrage if you tried to censor a modern-day rap song, in the age where the n-word is definitely taboo. I suppose the difference is that Mark Twain isn't alive to defend his work.

I agree with you on the option to self-censor. There are actually some movies I've avoided because I was sure they'd depress or upset me. It can't hurt for people to be able to know about the subject matter of a book before they read it.
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DAJB at 3:24AM, Jan. 14, 2011
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Just stumbled across this post, specifically dealing with graphic novels that have been banned during 2010.

Report
In an article in the Huffington Post the ALA has listed the top 10 graphic novels that have faced removal, and the reasons for removal.

Absolute Sandman, by Neil Gaiman
– Reasons: Anti-Family, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

Blankets, by Craig Thompson
– Reasons: Sexually Explicit content, Other (unspecified)

Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
– Reasons: Sexually Explicit content, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs

Fun Home, by Alison Bechdel
– Reasons: Sexually Explicit Content

Maus, by Art Spiegelman
- Reason: Anti Ethnic

Pride of Baghdad, by Brian Vaughn
– Reasons: Sexually Explicit Content

Tank Girl, by Alan Martin & Jamie Hewlitt
– Reasons: Nudity and Violence

The Dark Knight Strikes Again, by Frank Miller
– Reasons: Sexually Explicit Content

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier, by Alan Moore & Kevin O’Neill
– Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit Content and Unsuited to Age Group

Watchmen, by Alan Moore & Dave Gibbons
– Reasons: Unsuited to Age Group
Depending on which part of the relevant library these were in, it's possible that some of the “Unsuited to age group” and “Sexually explicit content” complaints could be justified, but I'm kind of amused (and more than a little horrified!) that someone would complain about Maus on the grounds that it's “anti-ethnic” …

I can only assume they didn't like the way it portrayed the Germans as bad guys!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:04PM
Mitaukano at 2:23AM, Jan. 22, 2011
(online)
posts: 178
joined: 3-26-2008
This is why the library has Banned Books Week, it's kind of like the librarian way of saying “Stop trying to tell us what to read B*$h's” true that's not an exact quote from Nancy Pearl, but I sometimes think it's what alternate universe gangsta Nancy Pearl would say.

On the topic of favorite banned books (I try to make it a habit to check some of them out during banned books week and the rest of the year)

And Tango Makes Three: It's about two penguins, granted they are gay penguins but seriously. It's just penguin’s people.

If you want to look at some banned classics take a look at the ALA's (American Library Association) extensive list with full on explanations no less.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:05PM

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