Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Clothing
deletedbyrequest03 at 6:46PM, Nov. 16, 2006
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I would like to improve the way I do my clothing. I think it looks too exaggerated… What do you think?



EDIT: And yes. That's a girl. And that's my character.

And if you want to see it on my DeviantArt: http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/43173552/


This year, school's full of BS!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:05PM
subcultured at 8:48PM, Nov. 16, 2006
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decrease your wrinkles…you shouldn't put that much unless it's really thing and wet
J
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:00PM
Darth Mongoose at 1:34AM, Nov. 17, 2006
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Yeah, too many wrinkles, plus there's no sense of thickness or weight to the fabric, the garments all look like they're made from fine, stiff silk that just sits the right way. There are no seams, the fabric adds no thickness to the arms or shoulders and doesn't peak, fall in folds or anything, making it look like it clings perfectly to his body, which enchances the ‘wet’ look. When I construct a character design and do the clothing, I'm always thinking ‘what’s this made of?', ‘how would s/he put it on?’, if I were to cosplay this character, how would I go about making this garment?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Aeon at 5:51AM, Nov. 17, 2006
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I'm a seamstress by trade, and I've always found that knowing how clothing is constructed really helps me in drawing it on people.

For example, the coat you've drawn would have shoulder seams around the top of the arm, which will change the way the sleeves hang. Also, unless that belt were tied shut, the coat would hang straight down; it wouldn't cinch in to her waist. She also has epaulets (Those accessories on her shoulders.) If they are made out of metal, or even another kind of fabric, they're going to stand up a little, instead of following the drape of the fabric.

The fabric as you've drawn it now looks like a very thin costume satin because of all the thin, fine wrinkles. If it were made of somthing much stiffer, like leather, it would have only a few wrinkles, but they would be very stiff, prominent, and deep. Also, think about areas of stress and contraction, and draw in the wrinkles there. Think about why the fabric is wrinkling there. Is it where her elbow is? If it's a leather jacket, wrinkles will remain visible even after she straightens her arm. Here's a picture of how leather drapes. Notice that the most wrinkles appear at stress points, like the buttons and belt, (and shoulders, because it's on a dressform that's too big for it.) Leather is so heavy that any part of it not in direct contact with something, will usually hang straight down.

Start noticing these wrinkles every day with what you wear. T-shirts and tight tops will have more fine wrinkles and creases in more places than your jacket. A dress shirt will have more, deep wrinkles at the armpit, but hardly any on the chest when you stand straight. Notice where seams are in garments, and see why they're there. Some women's dress shirts have a dart under each breast to prevent the shirt from hanging loosely. Some shirts, like baseball tees, have a raglan shoulder seam, where the seam reaches from the armpit straight to the collar, instead of around the armpit. This makes more wrinkles at the armpit, but gives you a better range of motion for pitching and catching.

Whew. Got a little long winded, there.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:46AM
deletedbyrequest03 at 1:16PM, Nov. 17, 2006
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Okay! Thank you, guys! ^_^

This year, school's full of BS!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:05PM

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