Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Coloring with crayons?
kyupol at 9:20PM, March 11, 2006
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Since I got used to photoshop so much(cuz its alot cheaper in the long run, doesnt make a mess, and can easily correct mistakes), my skills in traditional methods are really really really bad.

So… how do I come up with lighter or darker shades of a certain color using crayons?

And what colors are best for skintones aside from peach and lighter shades of orange?

Is it better to make the stroke 1 direction or to think of the object as 3-D and color according to its contours?
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last edited on July 14, 2011 1:24PM
Black_Kitty at 10:41PM, March 11, 2006
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Just to be clear on this…
Are we talking about wax crayons or pencil crayons?

.: Black Kitty :.
  
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
kyupol at 6:47AM, March 12, 2006
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both.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 1:24PM
ccs1989 at 7:43AM, March 12, 2006
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Um…I would recommend colored pencils or watercolors over crayons.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:37AM
Black_Kitty at 1:34PM, March 13, 2006
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I haven't used pencil crayons for a long time as well so I'm a bit rusty but I personally think that colouring according to the contours is a better method as it adds a three dimensional quality to your work.

As for darkening a colour, let's say I want to darken my red. What I would do is take my say, lake red and apply it to my cherry red. Or if I want a rusty kind of colour, maybe add a brownish colour (sepia? burnt umber? sienna?) to the red. If I'm desperate, I may use black but I generally think it's ill advised. One thing my high school teacher used to suggest is adding unusual colours to what you're colouring so sometimes I would fool around with the colours.

As for skin tones, I don't like to add peach too much as it starts to get too…peachy? A little peach is fine, maybe a bit of yellow and some red?

Not sure if I'm the best person to give advice on pencil crayons.

.: Black Kitty :.
  
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
mykill at 4:56PM, March 13, 2006
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Well, for crayons - they are difficult to work with. But after childhood most of us leave the medium behind yieling it an excellent medium to stand out with - no one else is doing it.

In Jr, High School I had a friend who could do VERY nice work with crayons. The trick is to work large, and work very lightly - over a good paper with some texture to it. Working lightly, you can blend the wax colours, and thankfully - crayola crayons are pretty dense with pigment.

Other idea*: work heavy and blend colors by melting them with a hair dryer and smudging with your fingers.

*I've not tried this out - is purely theoretical
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:09PM
skoolmunkee at 1:50AM, March 14, 2006
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I did a comic with crayons and markers once. I just used them very simply, but I can advise a little:

Use a paper with a bit of texture to it. Crayons will work on any kind of paper, but it looks much nicer on textured and you'll find you have more control over how much color is going down.

Develop a “grain” when you color. Kids color willy-nilly with crayons (up, down, left, right, circles, etc) but that will show on textured paper. If you are coloring something circular, use curved strokes. If you are coloring a wall, use straight strokes. You might be able to make things look different by using different types of strokes.

As mykill said, use it lightly. If you press hard with crayons on textured paper, you'll crush the texture and end up with shiny waxy spots, which don't really scan well. It is difficult to get thick, bold color with crayons without pressing down too hard but you can always experiment.

Stay in the lines :-D
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:38PM
gothicbadger at 5:34AM, March 15, 2006
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BLUE :D
One of the few things I picked up in art class was that using blue in dark shadows really helps. Black is more of an outline colour and can make the picture (comic/whatever) look dull. Blue can be used like this with almost any medium, but this all depends on the style of the artist.

Best thing to do with skintones is try out different combinations of colour and pressure on a scrap piece of paper.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:38PM
mechanical_lullaby at 2:32AM, March 16, 2006
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mykill
Other idea*: work heavy and blend colors by melting them with a hair dryer and smudging with your fingers.

*I've not tried this out - is purely theoretical

I used to melt crayons on frying pans together to get some super awesome colors. They are good to work with anyway. I love when I break out the crayons in school and people stare at me and say "are you coloring in crayon?“ and I say ”Cha!"

But yes, they are hard to work with and they can smudge pencil lines into them(skin tones look especially nasty when this happens) so you might want to ink it and let the sketch dry first before you color. Also… keep them sharpened somehow(bite it sharp… or use one of them crayon pencil sharpeners… or simply color with the crayon at an angle.

For skin tones… unless you have bizarre blue and green characters, I dunno. The only thing you can do is mix it up and experiment.

as for dimensions using the crayons… it depends on what you want it to look like. Pressing lighter around places further from the light source with the same color crayon does it. Unless you want one dimensional stuff, then use the strokes.

last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
Anonymous at 3:42PM, May 13, 2006
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A thing I've picked up was like Skoolmunkee said about developing a grain, but once you've coloured in, in one direction to repeat in two or 3 more, it gives the effect of a colour block
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:53AM

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