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Cool "Facts"
bravo1102 at 10:06AM, Aug. 9, 2008
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The Soviets received 4,102 Shermans. Nearly all were M4A2 diesel engined variants. According to Steve Zaloga some 75mm armed were upgunned with the Russian 76.2 gun, but this was stopped after ammo stocks were guaranteed.

The Soviets also received:
British:
Valentine Infantry Tank III (usually Canadian manufactured variants with diesel engines)
Churchill Infantry Tank IV
Universal Carrier
USA:
M3 Lee
M4A2 Sherman
M3, M5, M9 halftrack series (including M17 AAA the only self-propelled AA in Soviet use)

The Valentine was well liked as a light tank like the T-60. One of the most successful Soviet tank commanders commanded Shermans (M4A2 76mm) The Shermans were usually supplied with the steel cleat track because of probelms with the rubber referred to above.

The M3 Lee tank was referred to as the “Grave for seven brothers” referring to its high profile, poor weapon layout and seven man crew. Several were captured by the Germans and there is some famous film footage of its evaluation. (imagine a M3 Lee tank with US serial number, Soviet unit markigs and huge German crosses on it)

The chutes on the Matilda were mud chutes and pictures of them in European service with the BEF in 1940 provide graphic evidence of this, as well as use in the Far East with the Australians (The Australian War Memorial has over 100 pictures of them online)(conversely the Australians also received several hundred M3 lees, but only 3 M4 Sermans)

The most produced tank in WWII was the Soviet T-34 series. The T-34 is arguably the best all around tank of the Second World War and is still in service today in certain parts of the world, but then so is the Sherman.

Due to the superior speed of turret rotation on the Sherman three Shermans could hold onto the German tank from the front and two would go around the flank and knock it out. German tanks despite heavy frontal armour were usually fragile on the sides and rear. The US also had White Phosperous ammunition which would fool a German crew into thinking their tank was on fire.

Both the Sherman and T-34 were easily maintained and crews were easily trained as opposed to German tanks which were over-engineered and built by heavy industry (trains). The Soviets and US built more tanks because they adapted their automotive industry to tank production.

Just for annoyance value a partial list of Sherman tank variants:

M4, 75mm dry ammunition storage (welded hull, Wright aircraft engine)
M4 75mm wet ammo storage (composite cast and welded hull)
M4 105mm Howitzer
M4E8 105mm Howitzer HVSS wide suspension

M4A1 75mm dry (cast hull, Wright aircraft engine)
M4A1 76mm wet (new turret with larger caliber gun)
M4A1E8 76mm HVSS
M4A1E9 extended suspension

M4A2 75mm dry (welded, diesel engine)
M4A2 75mm dry 47 degree hull
M4A2 76mm wet
M4A2E8 76mm wet HVSS

M4A3 75mm (welded hull, purpose designed Ford tank engine)
M4A3 75mm wet
M4A3 76mm wet
M4A3 76mm HVSS
M4A3 105mm Howitzer
M4A3E8 105mm Howitzer HVSS
M4A3E2 assault tank.
M4A3E9 extended suspension

M4A4 75mm dry

M4A5 (Canadian ram tank)

M4A6 (experimental Catipillar tractor engine few produced)

Those are only the wartime US variants…

The most heavily armed variant was the Israeli MK 51 “Super Sherman” with a French designed 105mm gun and US cummins diesel. These tanks were rearmed with hyper velocity small caliber cannon and are in service in South America. They are more than adequate to take out T-54/55 and T-62 Soviet tanks just like they did in the desert with the Israelis.



last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 10:35AM, Aug. 9, 2008
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bravo1102
One of the most successful Soviet tank commanders commanded Shermans (M4A2 76mm)
From his writing I got all my anecdotes. :)

He tells a great story of a tank duel in Vienna between a German Panther and a Russian tank destroyer. I can't tell you what type off-hand, but one that was all huge gun, low profile and nothing else. He said they came across the Panther unexpectedly in the long narrow streets of the beautiful city, looked down on by the glittering jewel pained windows of the close set, high houses and buildings above. The vehicles squared off and the Russian vehicle blasted the German one. He said the Panther was knocked back and the turret was blasted off and went flying.

But the crowd of Russian soldiers and tank crew that'd gathered to watch the spectacle were showered by the glittering rain of the shattered windows all down the street. They weren't too happy about that and his experiences taught him to avoid town and cites if possible. He also regretted the damage done to that beautiful city.
—————————–

Interesting about your comment with the Israeli's using Shermans against the Arabs. Actually a lot of the Syrian's tanks were re-purposed German tanks, like the old Panzer IV. So it was an interesting Re-match for them. Unfortunately for the Panzers though they hadn't been modernised as much as the Shermans.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 11:04AM, Aug. 9, 2008
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ozoneocean
Interesting about your comment with the Israeli's using Shermans against the Arabs. Actually a lot of the Syrian's tanks were re-purposed German tanks, like the old Panzer IV. So it was an interesting Re-match for them. Unfortunately for the Panzers though they hadn't been modernised as much as the Shermans.

Panzerjaeger IV, Sturmgeschutz III and Pzkpfw IV Ausf H and J. Sadly they were used on the front where the main Israeli tank was the Centurion and they never fought the Shermans.

The Shermans fought far newer and superior T-54 and T-55 series tanks.

The French and Bulgarian army used Panthers post war for a short time (they both had tons of spare parts too) Their use was abandoned because they were over complicated and maintenance intensive compared to T-34's and Shermans.

The MK 50 Israeli Sherman used a 75mm high velocity gun developed by the French from the 75mm L/70 of the Panther.

The most produced tank of all time is the T-54/55/59 series with over 100,000 produced since the 1950s.

The most produced armored vehicle of all time is the M113 Armored personnel carrier series.

Leonardo's drawing of an armored vehicle was inspired by the Hussite war wagons.

And now for all the British variants of the Sherman…
(just kidding)
The main one was the Sherman Firefly. A 17 pounder anti-tank gun was tuned on its side and mounted in a standard Sherman turret. The 17 pounder was equal in performance to the German 75mm L/70 and was one of the first guns to fire jacketed sabot discarding ammunition.

last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
athenastar17 at 8:46PM, Aug. 22, 2008
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ifelldownthestairs
the longest recorded attack of hiccups is sixty eight years.


dude i would kill myself after five. i can't imagine having the hiccups for an entire day, even…

I suppose if you had it for that long, you'd get used to it. Some people can hiccup silently, after all, so it might not effect you more than an itch.

Ummm…iuno if this has been said yet, but if you put a drop of liquor on a scorpion it will go crazy and sting itself to death.

And spiders, when their nest is destroyed, really will continue to climb back up the water spout (or the shower head, or the side mirrors on your car, or the wheels of your bike) until they are killed or permanently separated from that one spot.

A pick-up note in music is also called an anacrusis. As though one musical term for it wasn't fancy enough.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:03AM
ozoneocean at 5:58AM, Aug. 25, 2008
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-Lucifer means “light bearer”.

-Satan DOES NOT hold a pitchfork, he hods a fishing spear:
Just as the popular goat legged and horned Satan is stolen from Greek and Roman mythology (a faun or satyr), his weapon is Poseidon's (or Neptune's), trident.

You can actually see that it's obviously not a pitchfork when you realise that it's almost always barbed in imagery: You only barb fishing spears so the fish can't get away, whereas pitchforks have to be smooth so you can easily shovel with them and get rid of the crap.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
gothic_badger at 9:39AM, Aug. 27, 2008
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“A goldfish has a memory span of three seconds”
Depends, Dr Robert Winston put a scary fish version of himself in a tank once and the goldfish inspected it, he then proceeded to chase them around with it. A month later he placed it in the tank again and they swam off straight away. Not sure about their short-term memory but it made amusing television.

The Jaffa Cake people made a giant jaffa cake to let it go stale to prove that it was a cake and not a biscuit as it would have gone soggy. For tax reasons obviously.
My Music: myspace.com/theflavs
My Art: gothicbadger.deviantart.com
There's no harm in peeking.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:38PM
veritan at 11:24AM, Sept. 1, 2008
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The colossal squid's brain is shaped like a doughnut. Through the “doughnut hole” runs its esophagus. If the squid swallows something too large, it gets brain damage.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:40PM
valesse at 12:56AM, Sept. 6, 2008
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Yay! WtH?! I feel like a theme today~

Earth's magnetic field is due to the semi-liquid outer core, not the solid inner core. At around 500 degrees celcius metals lose their magnetism. Scientists are still hypothotizing about the cause of Earth's reversing polarity.

On that note, Earth has the greatest magnetic field in our solar system out of the (*sob*) eight planets. Not to say that it's just “better”, but it is stronger and larger. So… in essence it is better… unless you're not going for that. (I prefer to breath.)

Earth's gleeming white ice sheets and glaciers reflect light and heat back into space, and are indeed melting away… Some environmental groups fail to remind people that clouds (which are also white.) do the exact same thing only higher in the atmosphere. (I was so upset about it for years! You'd think I'd catch on.)

During the last ice age (the “Wurm” or “Wisconsin”, depending on where you live. ) Northern Alaska wasn't very different than from it's current climate today. Beringia, according to many archaeologists, appears to have been sweeping grassland with short trees, and a variety of large wooly creatures… (the last of which clearly do not survive). This is believed to be due to a jet stream being forced northward because of the Laurentide ice sheet.

Currently, the Earth is closer to the Sun during winter. In a little over 5,500 years, it will be closest in autumn. ~5,500 more and Earth could potentially reach another glacial maximum if the other two (speculated) factors are in conjuction. (But more about them later!)
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:39PM
MacLPirata at 12:38AM, Sept. 9, 2008
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LoveandGuns
subcultured
If you fart consistently for 6 years and 9 months, enough gas is produced to create the energy of an atomic bomb.

A pig's orgasm lasts for 30 minutes.



Is it bad that I lol'd at both of these?

Absolutely not! heh he

Another nugget of joy to compliment the pig… Male lions sometimes mate fifty or more times a day!

Hmm… Quantity or quality?
“Good night… Sleep well. I'll most likely kill you in the morning.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:50PM
MacLPirata at 12:40AM, Sept. 9, 2008
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ozoneocean
-Lucifer means “light bearer”.

-Satan DOES NOT hold a pitchfork, he hods a fishing spear:
Just as the popular goat legged and horned Satan is stolen from Greek and Roman mythology (a faun or satyr), his weapon is Poseidon's (or Neptune's), trident.

You can actually see that it's obviously not a pitchfork when you realise that it's almost always barbed in imagery: You only barb fishing spears so the fish can't get away, whereas pitchforks have to be smooth so you can easily shovel with them and get rid of the crap.

Lucifer was also (supposedly) God's most beautiful creation. Not bad for a guy who's only job was to sing and make music for his Creator, huh?
“Good night… Sleep well. I'll most likely kill you in the morning.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:50PM
ozoneocean at 1:25AM, Sept. 9, 2008
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The “light bearer” name gives the Christian mythology a nice tie-in with both Norse and Greek myth: Loki, a half god , half giant who was associated with fire, some say he gave fire to man. He was also a rebel.

Prometheus, a Titan (giant, demigod creature), stole fire from the gods, gave it to man…

Lucifer, “light bearer”, an angel (an almost-god creature) rebelled against his god, gave man knowledge or forbidden things.

Nice tie-ins eh? :)

Interesting, considering the Greek myth is the oldest, then the Judao-Christian one (that'd have some Greek and Roman influence), then the Norse one would be the youngest.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 6:38AM, Sept. 9, 2008
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Competition and mythology creation. The Christians had to borrow stuff to create an ancient mythos to convince would-be gentile converts to adopt the “new” faith. In the Roman world “ancient” meant meaningful and worthy of belief.

Norse mythos is based on far older German mythos which date from the same time as Greco-Roman both of which come from Indo-European archetypes. The Greeks themselves borrowed from the Egyptians and acknowledged it in their writings comparing their gods with those of Egypt.

Mythical stories of the ancient world usually have at least two variations and which don't always agree.

The gods of Egypt and Babylon/Sumeria were Henotheistic. One different god was worshipped before all others in each city. Of course as powers shifted various gods and their adherents maneuvered for being the head deity. The gods of Greece are mixtures of deities of several migrations into Greece over time.

In all liklihood Yahweh started out as a Henotheistic deity (many references to him in the OT point to this, one god before others) and only later did he become the One and only God. Some scholars say this change may have occurred as late as the Babylonian captivity.

I have got to stop reading theological and religious history.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 9:32PM, Sept. 9, 2008
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It's interesting how a lot of religions can be traced back to a common source. Of course there's the idea of common themes and ideas that just happen to reoccur in culture without needing a direct connection, but we do know that there were direct connections here. Even ancient Indian Hindu myth has some connections to the earliest forms of Western religious myth…

So then the only really separate ones would be the Chinese originated ones, African, and South American?

Eh, that's probably too much of an over simplification :(
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 11:41AM, Sept. 10, 2008
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The people of Europe and India are all related in their origins. Also if we accept cultural diffusion which archeology has proven (Sumerian stuff found in Mahenjo-Doro, Egyptian Stuff in Old Europe etc) they knew of each other. When people get together what do they often do? Tell stories. So they'd influence each other over the thousands of years from Sumeria and Egypt to Greece.

Of course some of these stories were spread by invasion and were stuffed down the other people's mouths. (Indo-Europeans and the Vedic gods who are the basis of most indo-european pantheons even down to name roots)

Then there are archetypes. God of sky, goddess of earth, god of war, god of pestilence, god of corn, Sun god, moon god etc. Then there is the belief in spirits that the very world around you is alive. Shamanism and ancestor worship.

They're universals from China to India to Spain to the South Seas islands. Why? Maybe people have a tendency to think alike. Same idea brought up again and again as opposed to any conscious copying. Like pyramids. You going to build big stuff from stone and don't want it to fall down? Build a pyramid. An artifical hill.

Lots of minds out there and they have a tendency to think alike. :)

Certain stuff works because of how we're wired and other stuff doesn't. :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 5:57AM, Sept. 11, 2008
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Yes, just like certain technology just works a certain way so when people's culture and technological development reaches a similar stage they can come up with the same ideas and tech in parallel without direct influence. Like Edison and Swan with the lightbulb… although that's quite murky and there were earlier people involved still.

-Another example is people like the Greeks and Romans developing tech that wasn't developed again until the 19thC, like concrete, steam engines and mechanical computers: People in the 19thC didn't use Greek and Roman designs to develop those ideas, the tech and culture had just reached a similar point where such ideas and development were possible.

————————————–

Another fact that's not related to this…

The Wright brothers didn't invent manned heavier than air flight.
The technology had been in development and experiment for a couple of hundred years before they came along, in gliders. The Wright brother's real contribution was putting a light enough engine on the airframe to still allow and help flight, as well as useful controls.

When planes first came out they were called "aeroplanes“. In fact that term pre-dated powered flight, but after the development it was still used by everyone. ”airplane", mainly a U.S. term only came in much later, and is now supplanting the use of the older term internationally. Given that that's only really been happening in the last few decades, American spelling in Word processors is probably as bigger influence as anything else lol!.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 7:11AM, Sept. 11, 2008
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ozoneocean
American spelling in Word processors is probably as bigger influence as anything else .

Noah Webster when making up the Dictionary of the American language not only changed British spellings to make words simpler, also because he didn't want American English to be like British English due to lingering American Anglo-phobia.
Many of his contemporaries were vehemently anti-British.

The US Navy as late as the 1920s had detailed war plans to fight the Royal Navy. In the 1890s-early 1900s many admirals considered them the most likely enemy attacking in concert with their then allies: the Japanese.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
Willicus at 9:09AM, Sept. 13, 2008
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In Alaska, it is illegal for moose to pee on the sidewalk.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:50PM
Bittenbymonk at 2:24PM, Sept. 13, 2008
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Willicus
In Alaska, it is illegal for moose to pee on the sidewalk.
you can't impose a law on an animal! surely it's allowing a moose to pee on a sidewalk that's illegal
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:22AM
valesse at 7:42PM, Sept. 16, 2008
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ozoneocean
Prometheus, a Titan (giant, demigod creature), stole fire from the gods, gave it to man…
His name being “Fore-thought”, and his brother (Husband of Pandora) being Epimetheus or “After-thought”. They're also brothers to Atlas, but he's not that exciting! ;D

However on your note:
- Zeus is etymologically from “Bright Day”. Ironic that he's the mighty thunderer and creator of clouds.

_____
- The Greeks were not the first to create the idea of a divine family. This tradition/belief is thought to have come from the Near East. While probably not the original form of the story yet, the Hurrian-Hittite creation mythos appears to be a more brutal form of the Greek. (Teeth instead of a sickle, if you catch my meaning… those well read in Hesiod will, at least.)

- The Homeric Hymns, much like anything written by “Homer” might not perhaps be by an actual individual named Homer, however they are all attributed to him because they all use the same meter. This isn't a new development, but nearly as ancient as we might view the original (greek) compositions, themselves.

- While Beringia is believed to have opened 11,000 years ago, there is very convincing evidence (soft matter preserved in peet) for actual constructed human dwellings in Mount Verde, Chile aging back to 14,000 years ago.

- The African tectonic plate is not moving across Earth's mantle as far as scientists are able to detect. This is compared to the Pacific plate which is moving ~71.03 mm/year. That said, it will take 13,883 years for it to move just one km.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:39PM
THE D_KING95 at 4:31PM, Sept. 22, 2008
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Did you know that ROB And Big made a total of 24 records in one day that's neat well bye.
THE KING IN THE SHADOWS.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:14PM
warefish at 6:58PM, Oct. 1, 2008
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did you know rhino's horn is actually a bunch of really hard hairs that are practically glued together? I didn't!

last edited on July 14, 2011 4:45PM
Kiruru at 8:27PM, Oct. 1, 2008
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I found out that cats sleep for 14 hours a day, That how much a baby sleeps I think
You say tomato, I say stfu no one says that!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:16PM
valesse at 11:02PM, Oct. 7, 2008
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Cats heartbeats race at near 100 beats per minute. They're also while ‘awake’ in a mental sleep… that is to say that their minds are functioning at a level we would as humans place between the two.

The Law of Superposition (Older layers of deposition are below newer layers) is actually fairly recent considering how basic we might believe it's concept to be, hailing from the later Englightenment.

Bethoveen wrote several concertos for harpsicords which would have been considered ‘out of tune’ according to popular use of the instrument at that time, because each key wasn't tuned for each half step of a note. (*note, I know nothing of music, my radio told me everything!)

The Great Salt Lake in Utah used to be 3 times the size it is currently, and the area surrounding was once marsh land. The Native Americans residing in that region were less interested in fish than the water fowl (so the archaeological records leads us to believe.)
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:39PM
AQua_ng at 8:21AM, Oct. 8, 2008
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A strawberry is not a berry. An apple is.

K.A.L.A-dan! Brigade Captain :D
K.A.L.A.-dan forums!
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:59AM
darrell at 7:23AM, Oct. 9, 2008
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AQua_ng
A strawberry is not a berry. An apple is.

Half right. Going with the botanical definition of a berry, neither strawberries nor apples are berries. They are both “accessory fruits”. However, the tomato, eggplant, chili pepper, and grape all fit into the botanical definition of a berry.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berry
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessory_fruit
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
ozoneocean at 10:06AM, Oct. 9, 2008
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You have to remember though that al those definitions are relatively recent and are really a nonsense, in essence. :)
Most were primarily created simply to facilitate the business of international trade, regarding sanctions, tariffs, import duties and things by international agreement, sometime in the early 20thC. ;)

Before that, what are called “berries” were berries for hundreds of years, same for the fruits and veggies, and still are to most people.
—————–

What they've done, basically, is like going and giving you a new name: instead of calling you by tour birth name, you're now known as your social security number, just because it fits in the system easier. But most people, including you will still use your birth name regardless. lol!
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
darrell at 11:26AM, Oct. 9, 2008
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ozoneocean
You have to remember though that al those definitions are relatively recent and are really a nonsense, in essence. :)
Most were primarily created simply to facilitate the business of international trade, regarding sanctions, tariffs, import duties and things by international agreement, sometime in the early 20thC. ;)

Before that, what are called “berries” were berries for hundreds of years, same for the fruits and veggies, and still are to most people.

Actually, those definitions are not nonsense. They are the botanical/scientific definitions for what makes something a berry and they were not created to facilitate trade. And I stand by my comment, in no way is an apple a berry.

The problem with “fruit” versus “vegetable” is that there exists more than one definition of what is a fruit. There is the scientific one that has nothing to do with trade and then there's the more open culinary definition that many people use. Vegetable on the other hand, is not a scientific term, it is a culinary one. The tomato for example, it fits into the scientific definition of a fruit but also fits into what people see as a vegetable. Then the court case occurred in 1887:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato#Fruit_or_vegetable.3F
The court deemed the tomato to be a vegetable because it was recognized by most people as such but still recognized that scientifically speaking, it's a fruit.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
ozoneocean at 10:29PM, Oct. 9, 2008
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Hahaha! You've made the mistake there of thinking of science as something objective and outside of society. ;)
The names “fruit”, “berry” etc are not the product of science man. ;)
These things were indeed the product of agreements very late in the day. It's always funny to me that people think of the world as being arbitrated by objective authorities on things. :)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
darrell at 6:30AM, Oct. 10, 2008
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ozoneocean
Hahaha! You've made the mistake there of thinking of science as something objective and outside of society. ;)

Again, the links I provided do give objective definitions to what is a berry and what is a fruit in scientific terms. The statement that strawberries are not berries comes from the scientific definition. If you choose the culinary definition then yes, a strawberry is said to be a berry (as was shown in the links I posted). In neither definition is an apple a berry.

ozoneocean
The names “fruit”, “berry” etc are not the product of science man. ;)

These terms are used in science and have a clear definition there. They just don't match the commonplace or culinary use of the terms which is where the confusion starts. That doesn't make them nonsense.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
ozoneocean at 3:01AM, Oct. 11, 2008
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I think you misunderstand lol!
The terms for fruit and veggies were the products of the societies and cultures that conceived them. As with the science. ;)
BUT, these fruits, berries, and veggies were known as berries fruits and veggies for millennia and that's what they were. UNTIL later consensus, scientific and trade, decided they had to fit into specific categories based on various characterises. But you see, one doesn't necessarily take precedence over the other, especially since they were known and still are know in the origial ways for far longer.

And sciences is no more objective than the cultures that came up with it in terms of names. Instead of choosing the name “fruit” for the scientific category, they could have gone with a made up neutral name like “wobblebobble”, but they decided to use the existing terms instead. :)

—————————-

Facts:
People say the earth is a big ball of rock spinning in space, but it's probably batter to say it's a big ball of steel, since the iron and nickel molten core constitutes the largest constituent of the elements that make up the planet.

Iron is also the end point of a lot of stars. Once the most part of them turns to iron through the nuclear processes, it takes far too much energy to change into anything else so they collapse. Iron being the most stable element.

Titanium knifes can't hold as sharper edge as steel knives. Although they're stronger, they just can't get a good edge.

Most manufactured items, machinery, and buildings on the face of this planet are made with steel in some part.

The only iron found naturally on the surface of the planet comes form meteorites. All else is bound up in ore.

Manganese, Magnesium, and Magnetite were all named after the place they were found; the Greek Island of Magnesia. All they have in common is the name, the island and the look of the ore. It's also where we get the names “magnet” etc, because of Magnetite which contains iron and tends to be naturally magnetic.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM

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