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Cool "Facts"
Ironscarfs Ghost at 7:06PM, Oct. 11, 2008
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Guitarist Blind Willie Dunn wasn't blind at all. Not even short sighted.
Er……..boo!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
Jellomix at 1:22PM, Oct. 18, 2008
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Glass is considered to be a fluid.
It actually flows at a very slow rate. You'll notice that old European cathedrals have glass windows that are thin at the top but gets thicker at the bottom because the glass has been drooping over a long period of time.
However, this might not be for modern glass.
Sig? Yeah, I'll get to it. >_<
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:07PM
darrell at 8:58AM, Oct. 20, 2008
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Jellomix
You'll notice that old European cathedrals have glass windows that are thin at the top but gets thicker at the bottom because the glass has been drooping over a long period of time.

That has been disproven. The reason the glass is thicker on the bottom has never been proven without a doubt but the evidence points to how it was made (and they intentionally installed the window with the heavy end on the bottom for more stability, so it wasn't top heavy). It has been proven that it is not because the glass is flowing as it would need a lot longer to have flowed that much and will actually result in a shortening of the pane and not a thinning of it.
http://www.sciencenews.org/sn_arc98/5_30_98/fob3.htm
http://www.thefoa.org/tech/glass.htm
http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
ozoneocean at 7:21AM, Oct. 22, 2008
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Many things have long histories that we're unaware of…

The word "spitfire“, used famously as the name for the British WW2 SuperMarine fighterplane comes from a long history of use in the Royal Navy as a name for fighting ships. It originates from the late 1500's from when Sir Francis Drake captured a Spanish Man ‘O war. It was officially called something like ”our lady of the immaculate conception“, but the crew called her ”Cacafuego“.
Which means ”Fire shitter“. This turned into ”Spitfire". :)

The modern men’s business suite has a long and distinguished heritage of constant evolution through the ages, retaining many useless aspects from earlier in its history that it now no longer uses- such as cuff buttons that are only for display, lappels and a collar that are only for display and often can't be used to help close the jacket, the tie and so on.
If you look hard enough you can see where these things originated on medieval doublets, on to the stylised ornate costumes of the renascence, then onto rococo the coats off the 1600s. It becomes a lot clearer in the elaborate coats and waistcoats and wigs of the 1700's (think of pirate coats with the buttoned folded back cuffs, the frothy neck scarves). And extremely obvious in the tailed suits and straight trousers from the top-hatted 19th century.

:) That's fairly trivial to know. I don't know if that's cool to most people, but it's cool to me.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
Willicus at 4:39AM, Nov. 5, 2008
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In Alabama it's illegal to wear a fake moustache that causes people to laugh in church.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:50PM
ozoneocean at 6:36AM, Nov. 5, 2008
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It's real
>_>
<_<
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 9:27AM, Nov. 5, 2008
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Because of my love of military uniform which naturally over time became a love of the history of costume a lot of human costume has always been just for show like a peacock's tail though at one time it may have been functional.

Originally as a man's coat bulked up towards the middle of the 17th century the cuffs of a man's coat folded down as mittens and gloves were too expensive. Before that they had been for show being parts of the shirt and often simply ruffles and lace.

Sleeve buttons were added first to military uniforms. Why? To stop the soldier from wiping his nose with his cuff. Cuffs on coats were still functional and folded down into the 19th Century. Coats that buttoned over predate those with lapels as button back lapels were double breasted coats and were originally for show as well as functional. More lace.

Once upon a time overcoats were called patrol or sentry coats and only issued to the soldier when on sentry duty. All the rest of the time he had to button over his normal coat and think warm thoughts.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 3:56PM, Nov. 5, 2008
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speaking of word origins and clothing…
I was a bit dismayed at reading a clothing catalogue this morning to find all the shorts and pants described as “Short” and “pant”. This idiotic trend of re-imagining these words as the singular versions of the real names… Fucking idiots.

So I looked up “Pants” on dictionary.com on a whim and found an interesting history for the word “Pants”.
Dictionary.com regarding pants
Word History: One would not expect a word for a modern article of clothing to come ultimately from the name of a 4th-century Roman Catholic saint, but that is the case with the word pants. It can be traced back to Pantaleon, the patron saint of Venice. He became so closely associated with the inhabitants of that city that the Venetians were popularly known as Pantaloni. Consequently, among the commedia dell'arte's stock characters the representative Venetian (a stereotypically wealthy but miserly merchant) was called Pantalone, or Pantalon in French. In the mid-17th century the French came to identify him with one particular style of trousers, a style which became known as pantaloons in English. Pantaloons was later applied to another style that came into fashion in the late 18th century, tight-fitting garments that had begun to replace knee breeches. After that pantaloons was used to refer to trousers in general. The abbreviation of pantaloons to pants met with some resistance at first; it was considered vulgar and, as Oliver Wendell Holmes put it, “a word not made for gentlemen, but ‘gents.’” First found in the writings of Edgar Allan Poe in 1840, pants has replaced the “gentleman's word” in English and has lost all obvious connection to Saint Pantaleon.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
bravo1102 at 10:40AM, Nov. 6, 2008
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According to Fowler's Modern English Usage Pant versus Pants is American English invading the English speaking world again.

I always wondered why it was a pair of pants, is each pantaloon considered a leg of said trousers?

Pantalettes became panties[/i[, underdrawers worn by women. (Pantalettes is a Well known term to those of us who read and write bodice ripper romances.)

By the way according to some historians one great contribution of the Barbarian Germanic tribes to Western European Civilization are trousers as opposed to togas and other skirts and dresses worn by Greco-Roman peoples. (The other two are the names of the days of the week and the nuclear versus extended family as the standard household. The great contribution of the Norse Vikings is keel built ships. I had a friend in college who wrote a paper on it and one of his references was a piece of the Gokkstad ship, talk about primary sources :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
crocty at 12:18PM, Nov. 12, 2008
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A massive editing problem slips into the final cut of Taxi Driver, where Travis Bickle (Robert DeNiro) repeatedly questions someone off-camera, asking, “Are you talking to me?” The problem: As a different shot soon shows, no one is talking to him.
THIS NEW SITE SUCKS I'M LEAVING FOREVER I PROMISE, GUYS.
NOT BLUFFING, I'M GONE IF YOU DON'T FIX IT.
Oh god I'm so alone someone pay attention to me
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:52AM
Koshou at 7:36PM, Nov. 15, 2008
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Giant squids have the largest eyeballs of any living creature.

In Florida, it's illegal to sing while wearing a bathing suit. obviously this happens a lot, but nobody ever gets in trouble for it.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:21PM
ozoneocean at 8:42PM, Nov. 15, 2008
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Titanium is bad for making knives.
Titanium blades can't hold an edge very well. They're strong and don't corrode easily, but you have to constantly re-sharpen them.

Some compromises include:
-Simply coating a steel knife with titanium to stop it rusting.
-Making the edge out of something different, like coating it with boron crystals.
- Applying extremely expensive high tech techniques to temper the titanium blade in such a way as to make it almost as good at holding an edge as a much, much cheaper steal blade.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
BffSatan at 12:40AM, Nov. 18, 2008
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Willicus
In Alabama it's illegal to wear a fake moustache that causes people to laugh in church.

Holy crap, just a few weeks ago that actually happened in my school's chapel service, it was to raise awareness of Movember.

Thank God I don't live in Alabama.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:20AM
humorman at 12:27AM, Nov. 30, 2008
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You may know George Washington Carver is credited with creating roughly 300 uses for peanuts. What you may not know is that of these uses, peanut butter was NOT among them – it had been patented earlier by Marcellus Gilmore Edson.



Ever wonder why black belts are given in regards to mastery of the martial arts? It turns out rather than issuing a belt for every advancement, it was cheaper to dye a single belt multiple times for each promotion. By the time you reached your last advancement, the belt would be dyed with so many colors so many times that it'd be black.



The bones in your forearm are the same size as your foot. If you were to place the heel of your right foot on the inside of your left elbow and line the remainder of your foot with your forearm, your toes would lie on your wrist.



There is an urban legend about how Twinkies are made from so many preservatives and additives, that they can stay fresh for several decades and even survive through a nuclear blast. In reality, Twinkies have a shelf-life of roughly 25 days.



In astronomy, you may have heard that some moons in our solar systems have names like Io, Titan, and Ganymede, but does the Earth's moon have one? As it turns out, it does have a name: Luna.

On a related note, the planets in our solar system are named after ancient gods (e.g. Venus - god of love, Saturn - god of agriculture, Neptune - god of the sea) but what is Earth named after? Well, Earth's Latin name, Terra, is named for a god – the god of… earth (as in dirt).



Although seen as a fashion accessory, high heel shoes were originally made for soldiers as a way to get a good grip on stirrups while riding on horseback.



French Fries are named for the way they are cut, not for the country of origin.



The cartoon show, The Flintstones, use to be sponsored by the Winston cigarette company and the characters of the show even starred in commercials advertising the product. This was because, like modern cartoons like the Simpsons and Family Guy, the show was targeted towards adults, not children.



Out of the 48 contiguous states of the United States, Minnesota is actually the most northern state. Maine appears farther north due to the curvature of the Earth.



Before nylon bristles were invented, toothbrushes actually caused tooth decay due to the fact that hollow hog-hair bristles would retain bacteria after brushing.



Some of the red food coloring in the food you eat is actually made from crushed Cochineal insects.



If you've ever found a mislabeled city or street address in a map and thought it was made due to the carelessness of the mapmaker, think again. Mapmakers intentionally put errors in the maps they make in order to thwart counterfeiters.



The “@” symbol was almost cut from the standard keyboard design. It was kept on due to the fact it was used to code email.



Many Americans have heard about George Washington's wooden teeth. In reality, Washington's dentures were made from a variety of materials ranging from ivory to gold. Ironically, not one of these teeth were actually made of wood.



Ever heard of the Swiss song “Der Ententanz”? You probably have – it's played every time people do the Chicken Dance.



The Mayflower was actually the second choice as the ship of the pilgrims. Their first choice was the Speedwell, a ship whose over-sized mast caused severe leaks in the hull. Also, the main reason why the pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock was due to the fact that ship had run out of beer and no fresh water was available to drink on board.



Only two mammals are known to lay eggs: the platypus and the echidna.



Water from the ocean has nothing to do with the color of the sky. During the day, the particles in the higher atmosphere naturally reflect blue light.



Prince, AKA the artist formerly known as Prince, was in fact, given the first name of Prince.



Despite what you may have heard, Lincoln Logs were NOT named after President Abraham Lincoln (who was born in a log cabin). They were actually named after the former middle name of the creator's father – Frank Lloyd Wright.



The People's Republic of China refers to China. The Republic of China, however, refers to Taiwan.



As of now, former President William Harrison has given the longest inaugural address to date. Ironically, he also served the shortest term of all the U.S. presidents.



The game BINGO was originally called Beano due to the fact that actual beans were used to keep track of the numbers called.



Thomas Edison, inventor of the light bulb, is often credited as the father of electricity. However, Edison insisted that direct current was the only efficient way to provide current to electric devices and believed alternating current couldn't possibly be a way to transport electricity over long distances. Today, anything connected to an electrical outlet utilizes alternating current.

Billy vs. Tree – The epic struggle of boy versus tree.
Sonic Colores – It looks like it's going to be a good game because I love how the way it makes me grow.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:51PM
ozoneocean at 2:41AM, Nov. 30, 2008
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humorman
Thomas Edison, inventor of the light bulb, is often credited as the father of electricity. However, Edison insisted that direct current was the only efficient way to provide current to electric devices and believed alternating current couldn't possibly be a way to transport electricity over long distances. Today, anything connected to an electrical outlet utilizes alternating current.
Turns out he didn't invent the light bulb either, but only won the rights to the patent… In reality many people had a hand it it, including the British man Swan who was forced to become his partner after the patent dispute, and Sir Hiram Maxim, known as the farther of the machine gun was another light bulb inverter who ran afoul of Edison's legal slipperiness…. But also many others.
The claim that Edison invented the light bulb is akin to claiming Steve Jobs invented the PC, but the myth persists. :)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
martinlo_23 at 2:48PM, Dec. 5, 2008
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one year millons of children burned and cuted their hands and fingers!

One time a pokemon episode give seizures to more than 600 kids!
DarkMartio rules.(That's me.) The cake is a lie. I heard u lieks mudkips.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:54PM
purpleglint at 5:15AM, Dec. 13, 2008
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Here's my ones:
eating bogeys is good for you whilst eating earwax isint
you can actually travel wiyh one bag
a ducks quack dosent echo
all polar bears are left handed
cows can walk up stairs but not down
a snail can go to sleep for 3 years
ants dont sleep
if you cut off a cocroach head it will survive for weeks before it starves
kangaroos cant walk backwards
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:56PM
BffSatan at 1:33AM, Dec. 18, 2008
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purpleglint
Here's my ones:
eating bogeys is good for you whilst eating earwax isint
you can actually travel wiyh one bag
a ducks quack dosent echo
all polar bears are left handed
cows can walk up stairs but not down
a snail can go to sleep for 3 years
ants dont sleep
if you cut off a cocroach head it will survive for weeks before it starves
kangaroos cant walk backwards
I have to doubt you on a lot of theese, they sound like myths.
Maybe it could be safe by itself, but mucas carries out germs from the body, and it's not good putting thoose back in.
I have no idea what you mean, you could travel with no bags if you wanted.
I know for a fact that duck quacks can echo, it's a myth that they can't, they did it on mythbusters and braniac, both got an echo.
Maybe a majority of polar bears are left handed, but it doesn't seem likely that all of them are.
Cows aren't really experts at either, but maybe your right.
In the wild a snails lifespan is at most 5 years, in the helix snail one year. So it does not seem like a likely outcome of evoloution to have an animal sleep most of it's life.
I believe your right about the ants, but I'm not sure.
It's a myth that they can survive a nuclear bomb, but this is true, it's becaue their nervous system isn't centralised in a brain like with humans. It's true for chickens as well because their brain is in their neck.
You're right about kangaroos not walking backwards.


On the subject of myths
Two snowflakes can be identical, there are only a few different shape varieties.
The fingerprints of twins are not identical, fingerprints form at random in the womb.
Shooting the petrol(gas) tank of a car will not make it explode.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:20AM
ozoneocean at 8:14PM, Dec. 18, 2008
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BffSatan
Shooting the petrol(gas) tank of a car will not make it explode.
It could… if the car was on fire, or if the tank was really, really hot for some reason. :)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM
ozoneocean at 11:53PM, Dec. 21, 2008
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Vikings didn't have horns on their helmets… But their ancestors did! Bronze helmets with bronze horns from pre Viking cultures have been found in the regions where Vikings came from.
—————

Ooo, here's some “seasonal” stuff from Dictionary.com:

Ok, the origin of the name "Jesus“ as we know it today:

c.1175 (O.E. simply used halend ”savior“ ), from Gk. Iesous, attempt to render Aramaic proper name Jeshua (Heb. Yeshua) ”Jah is salvation," a common Jewish personal name, the later form of Heb. Yehoshua (see Joshua). As an oath, attested from 1377. For Jesus H. Christ (1924), see I.H.S. First record of Jesus freak is from 1970. Jesu, common in M.E., is from the O.Fr. objective case.

—————– So the word as we know it is over 1000 years after the historical character's origin.

And "Christ“ comes from:

O.E. crist, from L. Christus, from Gk. khristos ”the anointed“ (translation of Heb. mashiah, see messiah), from khriein ”to rub, anoint,“ title given to Jesus of Nazareth. The L. term drove out O.E. hæland ”healer“ as the preferred descriptive term for Jesus. A title, treated as a proper name in O.E., but not regularly capitalized until 17c. Pronunciation with long -i- is result of Ir. missionary work in England, 7c.-8c. The Ch- form, regular since c.1500, was rare before. Christmas is O.E. Cristes mæsse and retains original vowel sound; Father Christmas first attested in a carol attributed to Richard Smart, Rector of Plymtree (Devon) from 1435-77. Christmas tree first attested 1835 in Amer.Eng., from Ger. Weihnachtsbaum. Christmas cards first designed 1843, popular by 1860s.

—————– And this one is also not contemporary with the character either… Seems his people would've called him ”mashiah Yeshua"
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM
lba at 10:20PM, Dec. 22, 2008
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purpleglint
cows can walk up stairs but not down

Having worked on a cattle ranch, I can debunk this one from personal experience. Cows can easily descend a flight of stairs, however they will not often do so unless provoked or otherwise given a reason. Piss one off enough and they will climb and descend stairs, jump ravines, knock over large objects, etc. just in an effort to turn you into a bloody smear on the side of the barn.

As for an interesting fact: Most people believe that Pluto is the furthest body in our solar system from the sun. While that is true for most of the time, about once every 228 years, Pluto spends a period of about 20 years inside the orbit of Neptune. The last time Pluto was inside the orbit of Neptune was the period between 1979 and 1999.

The reason Pluto was declassified to being a Dwarf Planet was because a body now known as Eris, which is slightly larger than Pluto was discovered and it was decided that both bodies should be reclassified as Dwarf Planets due to their smaller size. As such, we haven't really lost a planet in our solar system, but rather gained three new ones in a separate class as Pluto and Eris join the asteroid Ceres as Dwarfs.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:29PM
bravo1102 at 4:32AM, Dec. 23, 2008
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BffSatan
Shooting the petrol(gas) tank of a car will not make it explode.
It could… if the car was on fire, or if the tank was really, really of for some reason. :)

Now you know why there are incinderary rounds. A round with a tracer does have a chance of igniting gasoline. The gasoline itself is often not ignited, the fumes are. You're taught this stuff when you're a tank crewman, just to scare the hell out of you.

Diesel does not burn except at very high temperatures, much higher than gasoline. A lit match can be doused in diesel fuel.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 4:44AM, Dec. 23, 2008
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I typed “of” there, instead of “hot” (fixed now though). That's not mistyping, that's something wrong in my fricken brain. :(
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM
bravo1102 at 11:44AM, Dec. 23, 2008
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Someone
—————– And this one is also not contemporary with the character either… Seems his people would've called him “mashiah Yeshua”

Rufus (the 13th apostle) said they just called him “Josh”. ;)

His given name is usually reconstructed as Joshua Ben Joseph. Many Latin chronicles mis-spelled the name as Iesu Kristos Shakespeare often referred to him as Jesu as did many writers into the 18th Century.

The Sppellyng was bade enugh w'oute ye renamyng off Jesu or Iesu Krist. (no kiddies not internet Illiteracy, butt ye hyght off litercie off ye 17th-18th Centurys. Doo nott aske for ye Translayshyon, this be English.)

Before the mid-17th Century and the first dictionaries there were no agreed upon spellings of English words and into the 19th Century all nouns were capitalized. My family name was recorded with six different spellings in different documents of the Seventeenth century. Each document referred to the same man. (Cap'n Tomas Wylughbe)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 9:32PM, Dec. 23, 2008
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Yep, the name evolved a lot, but one thing's for sure- it wasn't Jesus. ;)

One thing I've always found interesting in a silly way is that:
- the Greek farther of the gods was Zeus .
- The Roman's took that over and called their chief god Jupiter, but the Latin name for “God” is Deus… which is so very similar to Zeus in the way it looks (not important so much because that can change), but it's so similar phonetically too.
- And the the name Jesus is also quite a similar sounding word…

We all know that Christianity is a hodgepodge of other faiths (like all religions), but it's interesting to think that the names of the chief characters could have a cultural decent like that. I wonder if they do?
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM
seventy2 at 5:08AM, Dec. 25, 2008
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the catholic church plagerized alot of other relgions, to make the transition easier for the locals.

such as the current view of satan is based on the pagon god…i forget his name, but he's half man, half deer. upper half is man with antlers…

also christmas is a plagerized Winter solstice, ironically the day the pagan god dies. and then is reborn in spring.
facara
Running Anew an exercise blog.
I'm gonna love you till the money comes, half of it's gonna be mine someday.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:29PM
bravo1102 at 6:24AM, Dec. 26, 2008
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It goes back much further than that:

Dyaus Pitar in turn is related to the Egyptian Ptah,and from Pitar came Jupiter and Zeus equals Dyaus," which became Deos, Deus, theos and Dios. Pitar becomes pater which is father.

In the end Deos Pater (God the father) goes back to the Indo-European Dyaus Pitar.

So Christianity is just a continuation of a far older tradition.

Norsemen often wore hammers as the symbol of Thor (the protector of men) The head was at the bottom. When converted to Christianity the Thor's hammer was turned upside down to become a traditional Christian cross.

One story: King Olaf of Norway only converted his kingdom (forceably) to Christianity when Christian missionaries convinced him he would be made a saint after death and that would gurantee his entry into Valhalla.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
Faliat at 5:06AM, Jan. 7, 2009
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I know this is very late but I had to make a few corrections to Omegasonic's post ont he first page…


No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver,
or
purple.

A goldfish has a memory span of three seconds.

In the last 4,000 years, no new animals have been domesticated.

1. Some of those words DO rhyme with others. It just depends on sylables rather than spelling. For example, Domestic and Eclectic. (Dom-es-tic, Ec-lec-tic.)
It also depends on accents too. In my local accent the sentences “Sorry, but I've got to go. I think I have a broken toe. I'm going to the hospital. ” rhyme.

2. Goldfish have longer memories than three seconds. If they didn't they would forget to eat and die.

3. One word… Hamsters.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
bravo1102 at 3:07AM, Jan. 9, 2009
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Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Lyndon Johnson are the four postwar presidents not to have an aircraft carrier named after them. Jimmy Carter did get a nuclear submarine, but compared to an aircraft carrier? ;) Even Gerald R. Ford has the upcoming CVN-78.

Carriers for battles/traditional names/previous famous US Navy ships (Bunker Hill, Independence, Midway, Bon Homme Richard, Franklin, Hancock, Langley) The first named for a president was the USS Franklin Roosevelt.

The only US naval vessel named for more than one person was the USS The Sullivans which was named for the five Sullivans brothers all lost together on the USS Juneau It is one of few ships ever with a definite article in its name.

I plane does not land on a carrier deck, it is a controlled crash. :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
ozoneocean at 9:09AM, Jan. 9, 2009
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As a form of recruitment propaganda, films that had the approval of the U.S. military (because they portrayed it in a favourable light), were allowed privileged access to all sorts of footage of military machinery in action.
So you get shit like Fire Birds with Nicholas Cage, and the Iron Eagle series.

Productions at weren't so favourable would tend to be blocked from accessing those archives.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM

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