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Coolest 80s animated show!
jalford at 1:47AM, March 28, 2006
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What was your favorite 80s animated series? Was it anime? Was it Canadian? Was it pushing some pointless toyline? Would the kids at school shun you if they new you were spending your afternoons watching it? Post them here!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:06PM
magickmaker at 4:04AM, March 28, 2006
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Was the old X-men show in the 80s? That was awful, but I liked it a little bit. Only for the Phoenix saga. (I'm a fan.)
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:50PM
Jillers at 5:32AM, March 28, 2006
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Voltron and Transformers and Rainbow Brite and Thunder Cats.
If there's anyone that can actually pick one of those (ok, minus Rainbow Brite, but I was a huuuge fan… still am.. shut up, I can stop anytime I want) as a favorite above the others, and not whether it's good now or not (cause, let's face it, Thunder Cats does NOT hold up today) then I pity them and their far too prioritized brain.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:08PM
ozoneocean at 9:36AM, March 28, 2006
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Robotech, Samurai Pizza cats, Galaxy Rangers….. Pizza cats was late 80's no?

I dunno, most animated shows from the 80's were crappy toy marketing gimicks, even so many of them still managed to gain a following. Transformers is a good example. One of the few of those I liked was She-ra.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
Tyrapendragon at 9:42AM, March 28, 2006
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I was a big She-ra fan as well. I did like Transformers and GI Joe despite the fact that they were just big marketing ploys.

Extremely corny, but fun was “Spiderman and his Amazing Friends.” The first time I ever heard of the Xmen was on that show. They had them on as guest stars a couple of times. For some bizarre reason they had an actor with an Austrilain accent doing the voice for Wolverine. Maybe they wanted the team to have more of an international flavor and Canada wasn't exotic enough. :lol:
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:35PM
ozoneocean at 10:37AM, March 28, 2006
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Australian? Things have come full circcle then, with the live action actor being Aussie and all, (albeit not with an Aussie accent)…
I remember The real Ghostbusters now! Since in the top draw they seem to think everything started in the 90s ^_^
That was a good show, nice dark storlines…. The animation was a cut above the rest too.

The Gummibears were fun and looked good, and that cartoon about the mixed up animals… Hippapotimooses and things…. That was another toy cash-in thing but Disney did a good job on the animation and the voice acting, just like with Gumibears.

I'm sure I'll remember others.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
Jillers at 11:38AM, March 28, 2006
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Transformers was a brilliant marketing ploy - but I had the (rather geeky) honor of watching the entire series, movie and all, a few months ago, and it actually still holds up today. There's a little plot - mostly philosophical about humans and robots coexsisting, and then the rest is giant transforming robots fighitng! Soooo cool!
The movie, as well, rocked and was horribly tragic and psychologically damaging.


The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpen. I remember spending a lot of time watching that
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:08PM
magickmaker at 12:15PM, March 28, 2006
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I saw a few “Spiderman and his Amazing Friends”s. They were funny in a horribly corny way. They messed up Iceman soooo badly.

I had a tape with the first episode of Kitty and the X-men on it. That was very weird… Aussie Wolvie was insane.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:50PM
isukun at 12:29PM, March 28, 2006
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Pizza cats was late 80's no?

No, it was dubbed into English in 1991 and the majority of episodes didn't air until 1996.

Extremely corny, but fun was “Spiderman and his Amazing Friends.” The first time I ever heard of the Xmen was on that show. They had them on as guest stars a couple of times.

One of the Xmen was a regular on the show. It seemed to be going for the superhero team theme with Spiderman, Iceman, and Firestar (who was created for the show since they couldn't get the rights to the human torch). They still show it on Toon Disney and it's good for a laugh, especially with their blatant disreguard for the physical sciences and even in some cases the source material itself.

Transformers was a brilliant marketing ploy - but I had the (rather geeky) honor of watching the entire series, movie and all, a few months ago, and it actually still holds up today.

I'd have to argue that a lot of it really doesn't. Especially when you look back and see all the gaping plot holes and continuity errors in the series. Plus some of the really retarded plot lines they had after the first season. I'll admit that parts of the series still hold up today, but only parts.

As far as merchandizing goes, though, what cartoon from that era wasn't trying to sell some product? Even Robotech was meant to have a toy line, but Hasbro bought it out first for their line of Transformers. Like Jetfire (renamed to Skyfire in the series), who was basically a repackaging of the Japanese VF-1S toy with some stickers to cover the UN Spacy logo.

.: isukun :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
Jillers at 12:53PM, March 28, 2006
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Your petty Transformers bashing will not stop me from saying that giant fighting robots is as entertaining today as it was 14 years ago. And that Soundwave was a scarey badass.

And dammit if I dind't forget about Danger Mouse!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:08PM
jalford at 3:40PM, March 28, 2006
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Spider-Man & His Reasonably Decent Drinkin' Buddies was supposed to be Spidey being more involved in the Marvel Universe than from the previous 2 Spider-Man series, including the Spider-Woman spinoff. It was also Stan Lee's thinly-veiled attempt at getting an actual X-Men animated series out there. Despite them appearing in more episodes than any other superheros who made cameos on it, plus the failed X-Men: Pride Of The X-Men pilot, nothing of it came until the early-90s. Iceman and Firestar were both written in as former X-Men, although Firestar wasn't introduced into the actual Marvel Universe in the comics until a little later on as a member of New Mutants. Wolverine had an Aussie accent in both the Spidey show and the X-pilot mainly because the networks didn't consider anyone from Canada to be all that tough.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:06PM
Whiskers at 6:47PM, March 28, 2006
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I THINK this was 80s, could be wrong, but Pirates of Dark Waters?
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:48PM
isukun at 7:45PM, March 28, 2006
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Pirates of Dark Water was 1991-1992. Just for future reference, I would recommend hopping over to the Internet Movie Database if you're unsure of the years when a show aired.

.: isukun :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
Jillers at 8:20PM, March 28, 2006
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I also suggest http://www.80scartoons.net/
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:08PM
Tyrapendragon at 8:53PM, March 28, 2006
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jalford
Spider-Man & His Reasonably Decent Drinkin' Buddies was supposed to be Spidey being more involved in the Marvel Universe than from the previous 2 Spider-Man series, including the Spider-Woman spinoff. It was also Stan Lee's thinly-veiled attempt at getting an actual X-Men animated series out there. Despite them appearing in more episodes than any other superheros who made cameos on it, plus the failed X-Men: Pride Of The X-Men pilot, nothing of it came until the early-90s. Iceman and Firestar were both written in as former X-Men, although Firestar wasn't introduced into the actual Marvel Universe in the comics until a little later on as a member of New Mutants. Wolverine had an Aussie accent in both the Spidey show and the X-pilot mainly because the networks didn't consider anyone from Canada to be all that tough.

I went on a search for pages about the show. It seems that Wolvie was dropped because he wasn't as cool in his 80s cartoon version as he was in the comics. They didn't let him use his claws at all since that would have been too scary for 80s cartoons. That might be part of why they didn't have an X-men cartoon until the 90s when cartoons became more violent.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:35PM
Tyrapendragon at 8:55PM, March 28, 2006
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I can't believe nobody has yet mentioned the D&D cartoon. I used to love that show. They showed it again on tv recently and it was fun to watch it again.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:35PM
jalford at 2:09AM, March 29, 2006
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Actually, The Hulk animated series that ran along with Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends in the 80s was pretty good. Certainly better than the 90s Hulk Series. The only other American animated series on in the 80s that were based on American comic books were the prolonged Superfriends series, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles which had about as much to do with the original comic as a the last two TMNT movies.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:06PM
ozoneocean at 6:45AM, March 29, 2006
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They might have used Robotech to market toys, but the Macross, Mosspeeda, Southern Cross source material meant that it wasn't as badly constructed as those US made cartoons developed simply for selling toys* … like all that Hanana Barrberra stuff. Not much of that was well done, the inks were always far too dark and the animaion was jerky.
*(I don't mind the cutting and dubbing, they did it well enough to leave a legacy of a massive fan-base)

Thanks for the info on Pizza cats Iskun! That was a while ago and I don't remmember that time well… Early art college days. :?

Jem and the Holograms was fun! I preffered the Missfits though, they had more pizzaz.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
isukun at 11:46AM, March 29, 2006
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and I think Samurai Pizza Cats was in the 80s…

Nope, '91 at the earliest. That is when it was dubbed into English. The earliest anyone saw the series was february of 1990 when the original show, Cats Toninden Teyande, aired in Japan.

.: isukun :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
isukun at 12:11PM, March 29, 2006
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I never wanted to watch it. It came out when I was in high school and had already started to dislike the way american studios where butchering anime. They changed quite a bit in the series.

If you must watch an episode, though, your can find one here

.: isukun :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
Hawk at 12:34PM, March 29, 2006
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You know, it may just be hazy memories and blind nostalgia making me think this, but I remember Inspector Gadget being a fairly creative and good cartoon. Just a few days ago I caught the last two-thirds of Bond's “You Only Live Twice” and saw the mysterious hand stroking a cat on an armchair and it brought back nice memories.

And is it weird if I liked Muppet Babies? I was a kid, after all.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:45PM
jalford at 1:44PM, March 29, 2006
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Although Real Ghostbusters was done by DiC too.

“I'll get you next time, Gadget! Next time!”
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:06PM
isukun at 2:43PM, March 29, 2006
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they seem to have had a lot more control over quality than the American shows had

It isn't so much a matter of quality control as it is a difference in what they are trying to sell. In America, cartoons are meant to sell toys or whatever products get advertised during the commercial breaks (for those shows that don't have extensive product lines). They are meant to keep kids glued to the set to bombard them with commercials. In Japan, anime is more an extension of the manga market. Some shows push toys and product tie-ins, as well, but primarily, the show is promoting the manga. It makes more sense, then, that the shows would have shorter runs with terminating storylines since the show loses its primary purpose once a manga reaches its end.

In terms of visual quality, the Japanese were just as cheap as the Americans when it came to sloppy coloring and line work. There are times in the original Macross where people look incredibly awkward and poorly drawn, or where the framerate drops to two or three frames a second. Even Toei did some sloppy work, like in Transformers when characters would be miscolored or just poorly drawn. I recall one episode where there is a shot with two Starscreams on screen at once or another where Cliffjumper is painted like Bumblebee.

Personally, I think some of the best animation out of the Japanese comes from the 60's and 70's. Back then it was still OK to make anime simply for its entertainment value. Miyazaki and Takahata were the last holdovers from that era in anime, though.

And the stuff was at least original…more than I can say for a lot of anime…just how many transforming element-based girl teams do we need, anyway?

Apparently not much, since they weren't a major theme in 80's anime. In fact, they really didn't even show up in anime until the 90's. Sailor Moon started that trend in '92.

.: isukun :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
isukun at 9:08PM, March 29, 2006
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They were produced by Marvel Productions, which, I believe in all cases, were then animated by Toei.

Marvel turned to Sunbow for many of their product tie-ins with Hasbro. It was a pretty common teamup, Marvel, Hasbro, and Sunbow. Sunbow handled the animation side of things and usually farmed out the labor to Toei Doga. Hasbro supplied the toys and in many cases were the ones who generated the ideas for the franchises. Marvel took the characters created or bought by Hasbro and wrote stories around them.

For Marvel's own works, though, they didn't team up with Sunbow or Hasbro. Instead, they turned to domestic animation studios like Hanna Barbera, DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and Filmation. Domestic studios were likely more expensive at the time, but Toei's deal was with Sunbow, and Sunbow probably didn't think Spiderman, the Fantastic Four, Silver Surfer, or the Incredible Hulk were as marketable as shows like Jem, G.I. Joe, and the Transformers.

.: isukun :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:03PM
ozoneocean at 11:27PM, March 29, 2006
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Galtar was shitty… It suffered from the same colouring trouble, bad figure drawing, dumb stories and jerky animation of so much of the work of HB.

I liked the fantasy setting though, and the story and chracters really reminded me of my favourite arcade game: Golden Axe!

Inspector Gadget was Cool! The new version is so very painful to watch though.

Does Babar count? I liked Babar.
 
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ozoneocean at 12:01AM, March 30, 2006
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FinbarReilly
and they had friggin' merchant and his son go from running gag to actually being useful later in the series
Those merhants! That was another thing that reminds me of Golden Axe… In GA the three heros could rob the theives/looters/merchants of magic pots and food and they even looked like the ones in Galter! The beasts they rode were similar too. There has to be a connection.

I always felt the stories in Galtar were a bit too much the same each time. I mean, they are in every cartoon, but in Galtar they were so circular with little variation. And his weapons were rarely used like real ones, it could have done with more traditional sword fighting action.
BUt as I said, the fantasy setting did draw me in.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
jalford at 12:41AM, March 30, 2006
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You should've said “Galtar AND HIS MAGIC LANCE”! Then we'd know who you're talkin' about. Especially from his appearance on Harvey Birdman.

Thank Gorf for Harvey Birdman! That show takes every shitty HB cartoon and puts it in its place!

Hanna-Barbera was the WORST in the 80s. It wasn't until Cartoon Network came around that they started making good stuff again. I think about all the horrible Flintstones and Scooby-Doo spinoff shows from the 70s and 80s, and it just makes my freakin' flesh crawl!
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Whiskers at 9:53PM, March 30, 2006
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Thought that those of Thundercats fanbase would enjoy this VERY well done fanart:

http://www.deviantart.com/view/29256878/]Thundercats, HO!
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:48PM
jalford at 12:57AM, March 31, 2006
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Jeezuz! Tigra still looks gay as hell!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:06PM
Tyrapendragon at 9:27AM, March 31, 2006
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I always thought about what a Go-bots vs. Transformers show would have been like.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:35PM

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