Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Drawing human comic book faces
Ryuthehedgewolf at 6:11PM, May 11, 2009
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Yeah, I've been searching on the net. I'm not really sure what a good way to go about this. I want to draw good looking eyes, the only thing I'm really seeing is manga-styled eyes anymore.

So should I just go for that?
Or is there a better option?

Thanks!
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:16PM
CharleyHorse at 6:57PM, May 11, 2009
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Here's a couple of links. If you write in a search engine you kick up a LOT of results.

Here are two that look pretty good.

http://www.onlypencil.com/blog/tutorials/drawing-the-human-eye/

http://www.ehow.com/how_2314008_draw-realistic-eyes.html

It's always worthwhile to learn a new aspect of artistic anatomy and techniques. If you devote even one afternoon to the study then you will probably be surprised and pleased at the results. :spin:

I want to add something. With a bit of creativity using a search engine, nowadays it is possible to kick up good information on rendering any aspect of anatomy. You can design your own self-study course and gain as good an artistic education NOW as people used to have to wait until college to have even a hope of duplicating. It's just as easy to learn all about American art styling as it is to learn all about Japanese art styling. All it takes is self-discipline.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:40AM
JoeL_CQB at 8:20PM, May 11, 2009
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i find the problem with those 2 links, is that they present the eye as if it was a shape instead of a form.

i was told to see the eye as a ball and the eyelids and skin to define the shape of the eye. and sometime looking at how other people approach it is good.

i use this as a guide.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:10PM
CharleyHorse at 8:31PM, May 11, 2009
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JoeL_CQB, I agree with your criticism, but those two links would be a place for him to start – a mere beginning, not an end.

I selected them pretty much at random because I did not have time to do a careful search. As I stated, all it takes is a bit of time and effort with a search engine to pull up an eyes study that WILL do the job.

last edited on July 14, 2011 11:40AM
repoman at 9:22PM, May 11, 2009
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I can recommend some old books that every artist should have, IMHO.

“Drawing the Head and Figure” by Jack Hamm (still in print and available through Amazon). This book has an excellent section devoted to drawing the eye (and plenty of other great “how to's” as well).

And any book by Andrew Loomis, especially “Figure Drawing for all its Worth” All his stuff is out of print and I used to have a free link to pdfs of his books but they don't work anymore. Google him and search around. I'm sure you'll find some free books somewhere on the web by Loomis.


last edited on July 14, 2011 3:05PM
CharleyHorse at 5:21AM, May 12, 2009
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Good call repoman. The Loomis books are very useful and since their copyright have expired they are free to the public. Here is a PDF file link where all of the available Loomis books can be downloaded free of charge.


http://www.alexhays.com/loomis/

To download a file I put my cursor on the image of the particular cover I wanted and Right clicked the mouse. It opened a menu and I selected ‘Save Link Target As’. Whammo! One LARGE PDF file downloaded to my desktop.



That's what I have been saying. Probably everything a young artist needs to know or find can now be accessed via the Internet for zero cost.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:40AM
repoman at 8:10AM, May 12, 2009
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Thanks for the Loomis links, CharleyHorse. I've been searching for those.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:05PM
CharleyHorse at 8:36AM, May 12, 2009
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You are welcome repoman. Thanks for reminding me about them. They definitely are a valuable internet resource. :spin:
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:40AM
Ryuthehedgewolf at 2:48PM, May 12, 2009
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Thank you so much CharleyHorse, Repoman, and JoeL_CQB!

I mean, not that I find anything wrong with anime eyes, it's just, I'd just rather not draw them. I personally just don't like the look of them. So I'll try those and those links instead.
Thanks again!
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:16PM
CharleyHorse at 3:10PM, May 12, 2009
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Enjoy Ryuthehedgewolf. With your enthusiasm and determination to improve you will probably be better than all of us some day . . . or at least better at art than me!

:spin:
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:40AM
Gillespie at 4:20PM, May 12, 2009
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These will really help me. I don't normally draw proper eyeballs on my characters, but I should know how in case I make a certain character with realistic eyeballs or for dramatic effect.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:36PM
CharleyHorse at 4:32PM, May 12, 2009
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Depending on how cartoony you draw, the main reason to study western style anatomy lessons is to learn how to exaggerate while still making it look as if your character is more or less human.

If you know, for instance, the proper spacing of the eyes in proportion to the head or roughly where the cheekbone should appear in alignment with the nose from a three quarter view head shot then even a very cartoony looking ‘distorted’ rendering of a human head, for instance, somehow STILL looks right.

That's pretty cool I think.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:40AM
Air Raid Robertson at 12:39PM, May 16, 2009
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Chuck Jones once said that everyone has about five thousand crappy drawings in them. Once you get those out of the way you'll start to improve.

Persistence is pretty much your best friend here. Keep working at it and you'll get better.

In comics, it's important to think about the facial expressions as they pertain to the eyes. What emotion is your character supposed to convey? Everything in your character's face should be built around that question regardless of the illustrative style.

Will Eisner wrote an instructional manual about this very subject. It's called “Expressive Anatomy for Comics and Narrative” and it's quite useful. You should look for it at your library.

Failing that, “Comics and Sequential Art” and “Graphic Storytelling and Visual narrative” are also excellent tomes for any aspiring comics artist.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:48AM
harkovast at 6:42PM, May 22, 2009
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for eyes, I came to the realisation that trying to make things look realistic is making a rod for your own back.
If you get close to reality but get it slightly off, it always looks freakish.
If you go for something weird, getting it a bit wrong makes no difference at all, it still looks cool.

I just draw a shape, often a distorted rectangle (generally for men) or curved triangle (generally for women).
Seriously, look at the eyes in Harkovast, I dont think one of them is eye shaped at all!

For more Harkovast related goings on, go to the Harkovast Forum
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:43PM
parkbenchbook at 7:38AM, May 24, 2009
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harkovast
for eyes, I came to the realisation that trying to make things look realistic is making a rod for your own back.
If you get close to reality but get it slightly off, it always looks freakish.
If you go for something weird, getting it a bit wrong makes no difference at all, it still looks cool.

I agree with everything said in this thread.

I'll add that you've got to take overall style into consideration as well, while never using it as an excuse. I'm not totally self-taught; I took my share of drawing classes in college. I can render pretty realistically when I try but I also can't do it consistently. I've had situations were I'll draw a super-detailed set of eyes surrounded by what ends up being a cartoonish figure and the character ends up looking like some freaky alien. In addition even if I did a perfect portrait, my coloring skills have a long way to go before I could do it justice. Ultimately, you want everything to fit well together.

That said, sketch as photographically as possible and it's only going to improve your art overall.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:38PM
TheMightyDM at 12:15PM, July 27, 2009
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I just draw circles, adding lines or curves as I see fit. Sometimes I just leave them as plain circles, making them seem to have a Wide-eyed sort of characteristic or expression of surprise. Of course, this is really only for cartooning, and not realism, but I imagine drawing circles and them adding overlapping lines would still help, at least the basid shape of the eye could be preserved.
So many people were so fed up about Michael Jackson's alleged child *ahem* “issues”… All I could think about was, “Holy crap! I wish I could do the Moonwalk!”
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:25PM
Jarrod at 1:36PM, Aug. 9, 2009
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I've drawn my eyes as I see fit to draw them through different people's personalities. Each set of eyes can be different for each person, or they can be completely the same.

Long oval shapes with a kind of rectangluar edge, yet curved. That's how I draw my eyes. I think eyes should be realistic yet silly.

Different emotions can equal different sets of eyes too. Even emo-cons like >__> or anything silly like that could turn into eyes to express or attempt to express a certain emotion.


Whatever you choose, you'll know that they're the right sets of eyes for you.

Draw.

Pew. Pew. Pew.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:07PM

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