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Early 1980s Nuclear Armageddon films
Aurora Borealis at 5:49AM, June 22, 2009
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what the title says…

http://cominganarchy.com/2009/06/17/early-1980s-nuclear-armageddon-films/

Found the link on Warren Ellis' blog/site. It has five full lenght movies (well, one is a half hour long document only but anyway).

“Nuclear War - a Guide to Armageddon” which deals on how modern society is most likely unable to survive a nuclear attack (shown on an example of some british city that I forgot the name of, sorry).

“Special Bulletin” presented entirely as fake news broadcasts dealing with a nuclear threat in Charleston (or is it Charlestown?)

“The Day After” which I saw yeeeears ago as a kid (well, parts of it) and it left a very strong impression on me and focuses mostly on Kansas (where there are hundreds of nuclear weaponry silos).

“Countdown to Looking Glass” which is a little similar to “special bulletin” in the way that its partially news broadcast and partially normal movie.

And finally… possibly the heaviest one of them is “Threads” which happens in Sheffield, and not only does it show the futility of preparations, but also the effects on the society for a decade afterwards. Basically, we revert to nearly medieval state.

So yeah, anyone needs cheering up? :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:08AM
Product Placement at 3:39PM, June 22, 2009
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Aurora Borealis
(shown on an example of some british city that I forgot the name of, sorry)
You forgot the name of London!?!

I'm going down the list as we speak. I just finished The Day after. Saw the second half of it years ago so I was glad to finally see it in full length.

I remember once reading about the difference between the early American and British civil defense programs, regarding nuclear attack. The British preferred to give the public the cold, hard facts so that they could prepare accordingly while the Americans were given practices like “Duck and cover”. If a nuke explodes near you it practically doesn't matter if you cover like that or not but the American government wanted to present an option to their people so that they could feel like they have more control over the situation. As a result, the British public programs became gritty while the American one were more positive.

Watching that guide to Armageddon, I see that the British have not wavered from that approach.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:51PM
Aurora Borealis at 6:23PM, June 22, 2009
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Product Placement
Aurora Borealis
(shown on an example of some british city that I forgot the name of, sorry)
You forgot the name of London!?!

Whooops! I guess they named the neighbourhood/part of the city and I mistook it for the city's name? It's either my geography skills or my memory :D

Product Placement
I'm going down the list as we speak. I just finished The Day after. Saw the second half of it years ago so I was glad to finally see it in full length.
Yeah, It was on tv when I was a kid and I was actually sitting sideways to the tv, drawing most likely (it's what I did all the time back in the day) and I only started to pay attention to the supermarket scenes when people are buying things up in panic mode. So basically I saw only half of it too, haha.

Product Placement
I remember once reading about the difference between the early American and British civil defense programs, regarding nuclear attack. The British preferred to give the public the cold, hard facts so that they could prepare accordingly while the Americans were given practices like “Duck and cover”. If a nuke explodes near you it practically doesn't matter if you cover like that or not but the American government wanted to present an option to their people so that they could feel like they have more control over the situation. As a result, the British public programs became gritty while the American one were more positive.

Watching that guide to Armageddon, I see that the British have not wavered from that approach.
Yeah, wait till you get to Threads. :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:08AM
Product Placement at 5:40AM, June 23, 2009
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Well, I suppose it was easy for me to recognize the names of those city parts since I used to live in London for couple of years. Also I could recognize the Thames river from the map.

Just finished “Threads”. Definably leaves a much bigger impact on you then “The Day After” since it dwells into the long term effects of a nuclear war.

The lesser of these movies were “Special Bulletin” and “Looking Glass” in my opinion. Special bulletin was all about what could happen if terrorists got their hands on nuclear devices but I felt like it underestimated the destructive power of the nuke. The news lady who videotaped the really fake looking blast was only two miles away which is a deadly range of such device.

Watching these movies makes me wonder how countries that are not priority targets for nukes would fair. I doubt many nukes would land in Southern hemisphere countries and the high north places like Canada, Greenland, Iceland and countries in Scandinavia aught to fair well during nuclear exchange since they're not that big of a target. If large countries like America, mainland Europe, Russia and China all go up in smoke, what would happen to the rest of the world? Would they try and help the affected countries? Would they have to deal with irradiated refugees? Would the lack of trade and supplies from the richer nations send them spiraling into dark ages as well?

I know that my country should be able to fair well in a doomsday scenario like that. It is highly unlikely for it to become a target for a nuclear attack, its distance from other countries aught to make it safe from fallout, it has a low population that's capable of achieving self sufficiency if it abandons imports like gasoline and luxury items. We would have to start using horses as a main form of transport. We have plenty of supplies to run our power plants for decades, we shouldn't need to run out of food since we have a large sheep population and a fairly active greenhouse agriculture. Our biggest problem is that we don't have any heavy industry which means that we will run into problems like how to maintain our power plants and machinery in the long run. That is unless we can establish trade with countries that survived the war, relatively intact. In that scenario we could trade clean food and water for the spare parts. That is unless they invade us. :(
Those were my two cents.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:51PM
PIT_FACE at 9:06AM, June 25, 2009
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aw wicked thread! thanks Aurora! love The Day After. another good one is This Is Not A Test.it's an older black and white movie aboubt these people that get stopped at a road block becuase there's a killer on the loose, and while they're all stopped and this killer's running around, America falls under nuclear attack and these people realize they're in the middle of a hot zone and they only have like half an hour or so to figure out what they can do.it's more of a talker then an action movie, but i think it's written well. always loved the ending too.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:44PM
PIT_FACE at 9:11AM, June 25, 2009
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Someone
I know that my country should be able to fair well in a doomsday scenario like that. It is highly unlikely for it to become a target for a nuclear attack, its distance from other countries aught to make it safe from fallout, it has a low population that's capable of achieving self sufficiency if it abandons imports like gasoline and luxury items. We would have to start using horses as a main form of transport. We have plenty of supplies to run our power plants for decades, we shouldn't need to run out of food since we have a large sheep population and a fairly active greenhouse agriculture. Our biggest problem is that we don't have any heavy industry which means that we will run into problems like how to maintain our power plants and machinery in the long run. That is unless we can establish trade with countries that survived the war, relatively intact. In that scenario we could trade clean food and water for the spare parts. That is unless they invade us.
true, but you're not gonna get to get mutated and all Toxic Avengery like us though. see how much you like being outa range when yer being slapped by a six armed robo fiend on the rag!hahahaha!
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:45PM
Aurora Borealis at 4:31PM, June 26, 2009
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Ok, got two people, yay.

:D

I'll probably end up rewatching them again soon while they're still available (the movies, not the people, haha).
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:08AM
ParkerFarker at 8:23PM, June 30, 2009
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hold up? Where is Mad Max? Is it just a given or something?

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:38PM
theprettiestpony at 7:17AM, July 1, 2009
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yeah, i came to this thread thinking we were gonna be talking about great flicks like
“night of the comet” or “creepozoids.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:25PM
Product Placement at 2:14PM, July 1, 2009
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ParkerFarker
hold up? Where is Mad Max? Is it just a given or something?
Calm down there. Those are actually good movies to look through. The titles that the two of you mention are not comparable with the ones Aurora is posting since they are more fantasy while these are more documentary type.

Granted that these film don't have mutants or the Thunderdome but they give you a good glimpse on how an actual nuclear disaster will take place. Or at least the British films do that.
Those were my two cents.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:51PM
ParkerFarker at 4:12PM, July 4, 2009
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well Mad Max, not Road Runner or Thunderdome, is actually a good movie. It showed that, in Oz at least, that road gangs would break out on the long stretches of highway because of the very little amount of authority. It showed the chaos.

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:38PM
PIT_FACE at 5:55PM, July 4, 2009
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ParkerFarker
well Mad Max, not Road Runner or Thunderdome, is actually a good movie. It showed that, in Oz at least, that road gangs would break out on the long stretches of highway because of the very little amount of authority. It showed the chaos.

no one's saying it isnt a good movie. it is, i love Mad Max. but it is different then these becuase just like P.P said that's more fantasy and these are more like documentaries. though with Mad Max you can say “hmmmm, this is what could happen” that's not the point of the movie.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:45PM
ParkerFarker at 4:14PM, July 6, 2009
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ooohhh, I haven't seen any of those movies so I wouldn't know, but maybe I should because that seems pretty awesome.

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:38PM
Product Placement at 4:50PM, July 6, 2009
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Sooo… you were complaining that these videos didn't include post nuclear sci-fi movies but didn't bother to look at them?



Oh well. Have fun watching them. Threads is British made and is by far the most depressing one, if you ask me. The day after is very similar and was made in America.

I don't like the ones that look like news broadcasts. They're both American made and seem a bit… I don't know. They don't instill any fear of nukes in me. One is to much like a conspiracy movie where this news reporter goes and meets this deep throat character while the other one is more about terrorism. I guess they do show you what would happen if terrorist get a hold on a bomb or if the government isn't transparent enough since the details that the news lady was trying to get hold on was something that could end the hostilities but the government was sitting on that knowledge.

The one that looks most like a documentary is “Nuclear War”

Edit. I want to include that these movies are not in any way cool or exiting. If they were, they'd be failing their task which is to accurately depict how serious these weapons are.

Here's a part from a documentary, showing what happened in Hiroshima.



The Hiroshima bomb was a relatively low yield bomb. “Only” 13 kilotons and was considered a very inefficient nuke. Despite it's flaws, it managed to kill around 200.000 people.

Now picture this. The largest nuke ever to be designed and tested was the Russian Tsar Bomb. Originally designed to be 100 megatons, it was scaled down to “only” 57. That's 57.000 kilotons or 57.000.000 Tons of TNT!

The shock wave could be detected on it's third passage around Earth and it could easily kill you if you were standing over 50 kilometers (over 30 miles) from it. Driving in a straight line at top speed it would have taken you over an hour to get to a safe zone from the blast.

Those were my two cents.
If you have any other questions, please deposit a quarter.
This space for rent.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:51PM

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