Media Megaforum

Epically acclaimed things you just don't get.
Genejoke at 2:33AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
By Epically acclaimed I mean pretty much universally praised, perhaps to the extent that you are considered stupid or weird for disliking it.

Film.
Pulp Fiction. (and most of QTs films)
Sure it has some decent moments and good performances but it did nothing for me on any level. Reservoir dogs is a far superior movie, in fact Jackie Brown is better.
As for the rest of his directorial output. Kill bill is just terrible and Deathproof is just dull and I didn't bother wasting more of my life with Inglourious Basterds.
That said I really like True romance, from dusk til dawn and natural born killers.

Gaming
Zelda.
I always wanted to like the zelda games, as a fantasy fan they always seemed to be the sort of thing I would like. Sadly A link to the past just proved to be twee and tedious. I hated the overly childish story, the quests were so bad they make most MMOrpg quests seem like Dickens. That aside it would have okay if the gameplay was up to scratch.

I later tried the two games on the N64, again they just bored me to tears.

Lastly I tried twilight princess, the wii version and I hated that too.
I always liked the look of the windwaker but never tried it.

Music
The Beatles.
Meh, is probably the best way to sum my opinion of them up. Yes they have done some good songs but a large amount of their output was decidedly average.
Nothing they have done has ever excited or moved me in anyway.

So step up and offer your suggestions.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
ozoneocean at 5:05AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 24,789
joined: 1-2-2006
Pulp Fiction was straight out funky and cool. It was just a nice series of little bits and pieces interwoven.



Gosford Park
This tedious piece of shit was directed by the great Robert Altman, I can only imagine that's why people pretend that it's anything above ordinary. Upstairs/downstairs machinations in a grand country manor… YAWN!!!!!!!!!!

We've had that same story 500,000 times over by every British author since before Chaucer and along comes a famous Hollywood director and some shitty unknown writer, they do it all over again even less inspired than you've ever seen it and suddenly it's so original and everyone loves it!
Oh isn't it so confronting and daring to show the upper-class boys having sex with the fat ugly maid… Jebus they even do that in PG Wodehouse stories for F*ck's sake!
What I couldn't believe was that I wasted an evening watching that at a cinema with my smart arty friends, instead of watching something intelligent we see a big screen version of every second English TV costume drama since the mid 60's.

And that's what I think of Gosford Park.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:37PM
Genejoke at 5:10AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
Someone
Pulp Fiction was straight out funky and cool.

To me it was cool as imagined by a huge geek who barely knows what cool is. Like a child who puts on a pair of shades quiffs his hair and looks in the mirror and says to himself “Yeah, I look COOOOOOL!”
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
ozoneocean at 5:28AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 24,789
joined: 1-2-2006
Genejoke
To me
Dork :P
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:37PM
Genejoke at 5:42AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
cheers ozone.
heh

Gosford park, meh!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
ayesinback at 5:44AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 2,003
joined: 8-23-2010
Not to pick on Katharine Ross, but neither The Graduate nor Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid came close to hitting the mark set by the buzz: weak story lines, 2-dimensional characters. Nice scores, tho (for the time). Since they're still held up as ground breakers every so often, I've been shrugging for decades.

Re Pulp Fiction, I liked it, but I think it was the soundtrack. It was octane. I came out of the theater after that movie entirely revved. In fact, soundtracks are absolute deal breakers for me.

As to The Beatles, someone posed a theory that this is one of the dividers: you're either an Elvis fan or a Beatles fan. Don't know that that's true (the either/or), but I really like The Beatles and can tolerate few Elvis tunes. Just for their ability to adapt and try new areas I think The Beatles will always merit a hats-off.
under new management
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:14AM
ozoneocean at 6:13AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 24,789
joined: 1-2-2006
Genejoke
cheers ozone.
heh
I hope you didn't take offence… I wasn't trying to be mean or anything.
ayesinback
As to The Beatles, someone posed a theory that this is one of the dividers: you're either an Elvis fan or a Beatles fan. Don't know that that's true (the either/or), but I really like The Beatles and can tolerate few Elvis tunes. Just for their ability to adapt and try new areas I think The Beatles will always merit a hats-off.
My mum was Beatles, my dad was Stones…
I came to like both. But the Beatles can be a little too measured and precise… Ahh, can't talk more, I've got a comic pae to finish and a newspost to compose!!!!!!!!!
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:37PM
Genejoke at 7:02AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
It's fine Ozone, I took it how it was meant. Don't worry.

The stones, them I get.

Hang on did you say comic page to finish? Is there pinky update coming?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
PPPchairman at 7:57AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 101
joined: 7-16-2009
The Green Lantern-He has all the powers of a god for 24 hours but can be stopped by a primary color.

Most of the Legend of Zelda games-They're the same gameplay over and over agian. Go to dungeoun find new weapon to beat monster repeat. I like the windwaker though probably because I have a weakness for sailing boats.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:47PM
ozoneocean at 10:23AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 24,789
joined: 1-2-2006
Genejoke
Hang on did you say comic page to finish? Is there pinky update coming?
Love the Stones.

Ya. I meant to update today, but it'll have to be tomorrow now… Then I have to write a BIG newspost… then pick my damn feature.

I neeeeeed sleep!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:37PM
Dark Pascual at 10:54AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 498
joined: 1-5-2009
Actually, I never got the love for Star Trek. Don't get me wrong, I think it's enjoyable, specially The Next Generation stuff and Kahn's Revenge movie, but I don't get the massive following that the series have.

Don't know if it has an universal praise, but I always received dirty looks from almost every person that I know for not liking Gerry… What an insufferable bore that was.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:07PM
blindsk at 10:59AM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 560
joined: 5-5-2010
Hm, I really liked Zelda, but I'm also a huge fan of fantasy and puzzle-dungeons (it has more of that than actual fighting). Plus all of the little quests added in. I'm guessing the type of person that doesn't like this game would also have a hard time getting into the ‘Cube’s Metroid series. It's less about blasting aliens than it is exploring a rather atmospheric bizarre world.

Oh wait, we're supposed to list the stuff we don't get? First off - Avatar. I acknowledge the fact that it did some nice things for contemporary cinema, but beneath all that I saw a generic story with ripoff visuals. They were nice, but they should've included a caption that says "taken from Roger Dean's outstanding landscapes“ or something like that.

Secondly, Star Wars games. I'm not sure if these are considered ”epic“ by the general public, but my friends tell me enough about them to make it seem that way. I've tried a couple, and they just left me thinking, ”what's the big deal?" With every new game, it's like the force suddenly comes up with new ways to work (hey, I can levitate! hey, I can one-shot enemies!). What's even more funny is the fact that they've been going backwards in time, and apparently the force was even more powerful back then than it was in the future? It just isn't making sense in general.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:25AM
Faliat at 5:10PM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 582
joined: 10-17-2006
Films:
Love Actually, IT, Star Wars and 2001: A Space Oddysey.

The first is a dullfest with massive plot holes to boot. Plus, godawful casting and writing from an otherwise brilliant writer.

The second I kept hearing as “Scary”. But even my sister and mum just found it stupid. And they're scared of clowns!

The third, I'm sure I've already expained. My dad seems upset by it, actually. There's so much meaning people try to put into it that I just think “Where the hell did you get THAT idea from?

The same with the 4th. Try to tell me that ”He goes back to the womb!“ and all that, it's still AGES OF NOTHING BEFORE THE FIRST VISIBLE SCENE!
I like the whole thing with HAL and that, but it's a side plot. It should be the main plot, resulting in an hour and a half of developed characters and settings. But nope. Ten minutes watching a spaceship moving towards us is more interesting, apparently.

Music:
I also don't get the Beatles.
”There isn't a band since that hasn't been influenced by the Beatles!"
I direct you towards my LastFM page, sir. I'm sure you will be enlightened!

And for the record, I disliked them before moving to Liverpool.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
mlai at 8:14PM, Dec. 8, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,035
joined: 12-28-2006
Zelda, Beatles
I think the meh comes from the passage of time. Sure, I do believe in ‘timeless’ things. But even timeless things become less relevant over time. For example, Greek myths are central to the people of their time. Now they're just interesting old stories for us. Console games and the rock genre have just come such a long way since the first Zelda game and Beatles song.

IT
You have to just watch part 1, and forget about (or don't watch) part 2. A psychotic clown may seem ridiculous to you, but remember these are grade school kids. I like IT part 1, because it's like a cross between Goonies and a horror flick.

Star Wars
Sci-fi films have come such a long way since Star Wars. And Lucas is like an awful king who is honoured for posterity because he luckily did 1 thing right in his youth, with lots of help from the actually-talented people who never shared in his glory.

Space Odyssey
Um… hard sci-fi films have come such a long way since… I mean this movie like predates the founding of some countries, LOL.

FIGHT current chapter: Filling In The Gaps
FIGHT_2 current chapter: Light Years of Gold
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:07PM
itsjustaar at 1:55AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(offline)
posts: 409
joined: 12-2-2010
I don't get the hype over most modern technology. A computer to me is just another typewriter with a television attached, and we seem to have a drive to keep adding ‘moar.’

Funny thing is though, it'll be five years from now and we still don't have hoverboards, flying ships, or lightsabers.
“Keeping Up with Thursday” - Updated Every 3 Days!
“ZombieToons Must Die” - hiatus. D:
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:05PM
Faliat at 3:03AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 582
joined: 10-17-2006
Regarding modern technology, I don't get the sudden urge for everyone to make touchscreen phones.

They get dirty as hell and are so fragile an EGG would make a better device!

mlai
Zelda, Beatles
I think the meh comes from the passage of time. Sure, I do believe in ‘timeless’ things. But even timeless things become less relevant over time. For example, Greek myths are central to the people of their time. Now they're just interesting old stories for us. Console games and the rock genre have just come such a long way since the first Zelda game and Beatles song.

IT
You have to just watch part 1, and forget about (or don't watch) part 2. A psychotic clown may seem ridiculous to you, but remember these are grade school kids. I like IT part 1, because it's like a cross between Goonies and a horror flick.

Star Wars
Sci-fi films have come such a long way since Star Wars. And Lucas is like an awful king who is honoured for posterity because he luckily did 1 thing right in his youth, with lots of help from the actually-talented people who never shared in his glory.

Space Odyssey
Um… hard sci-fi films have come such a long way since… I mean this movie like predates the founding of some countries, LOL.
Yeah. Time has passed on Star Wars, Zelda, The Beatles and the movie that I call “Epileptic Space Babies”, but there are people NOW that watch/play/listen to them for the first time and think they're amazing.

And how many times have I heard people say that these movies are better than Avatar. When at least it is a two hour movie that doesn't FEEL like five and has at least semi-plausible science in it instead of MAGIC. At least the parasite explaination from the prequels wasn't as bad as Jedi being kendo practising WIZARDS!

I'm not saying Avatar is perfect, but it deserves more praise and respect.
This is coming from someone who has seen it in “3D”, and on BRD and DVD. The technology used during it's production has nothing to do with why my family likes it. Even my sci-fi hating mum thinks it's good!

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
DAJB at 3:18AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 1,462
joined: 2-23-2007
I think I'm possibly just paraphrasing what mlai said, or at least coming at the same point from a different angle. But the problem with most of the examples in this thread is that it's no longer possible to see them in the same way as they were when they first hit the scene. And, in many cases, the reason it's no longer possible to view them in that way is precisely because they changed things so much that we now take for granted the rules that they established.

The Beatles? Sure, it's easy to dismiss a lot of their early songs as bland, sing-along, disposable pop but … at the beginning of the Sixties, there was nothing like it. Much like today, song-writing then was firmly in the hands of “factories” and the stars who sang the songs were “manufactured” and controlled by a few impresarios operating behind the scenes. The innovation in the later Beatles songs, while not to everyone's taste (even back then!), arguably opened the doors for the likes of Floyd and even bands like Radiohead and The Flaming Lips.

Zelda? Well, yeah, it never appealed to me but it was quite ground-breaking at the time. By mixing elements of platforming, item collection, puzzle-solving and combat all in one game, titles like Zelda and the first Tomb Raider pretty much defined the format of the video games we're still playing today. We can't see it now because it's difficult to see past the blocky graphics, the fact that the franchises have been wrung dry and the mindless media trivia about whether the latest instalment makes Lara's breasts look any more (or less) realistic. But they laid the ground rules that games are still following now.

Star Wars? Relative to the 1970s, we are now swamped with Science Fiction movies and TV shows which boast pretty high production values. But to an audience which had grown up on a tinfoil clad Buck Rogers holding a cardboard flight deck together or the occasional “serious” (but not especially entertaining) movie like Silent Running, Star Wars was revolutionary! Suddenly SciFi movies were allowed to both look good and be fun! Yeah, we're spoiled now and the Star Wars franchise is such an institution that it will never again have the same impact as it did on first release, but we should still acknowledge the value of what it achieved. Without it we wouldn't have Farscape or Firefly or possibly even any of the Star Trek series (other than the first, obviously!) By making SciFi a bankable genre, it was possible for films like Alien, Flash Gordon and Blade Runner to get made.

As for my contribution to things I really don't understand the appeal of, I'd go with the current fascination with 3D movies. I enjoyed Avatar well enough in a superficial, fairly hackneyed, adventure romp kind of a way and some of the 3D moments did look cool but did they really add anything to my enjoyment of the film? No. To me, the film is as good or as bad as it seems to be; whether you happen to see it in 2D or 3D really doesn't seem to make any great difference.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:04PM
Genejoke at 4:38AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
Someone
Zelda? Well, yeah, it never appealed to me but it was quite ground-breaking at the time. By mixing elements of platforming, item collection, puzzle-solving and combat all in one game, titles like Zelda and the first Tomb Raider pretty much defined the format of the video games we're still playing today. We can't see it now because it's difficult to see past the blocky graphics, the fact that the franchises have been wrung dry and the mindless media trivia about whether the latest instalment makes Lara's breasts look any more (or less) realistic. But they laid the ground rules that games are still following now.

Zelda is of my time and it never did jack for me, there were other far superior games that did the same or more and better but they weren't so successful.

Someone
The Beatles? Sure, it's easy to dismiss a lot of their early songs as bland, sing-along, disposable pop but … at the beginning of the Sixties, there was nothing like it. Much like today, song-writing then was firmly in the hands of “factories” and the stars who sang the songs were “manufactured” and controlled by a few impresarios operating behind the scenes. The innovation in the later Beatles songs, while not to everyone's taste (even back then!), arguably opened the doors for the likes of Floyd and even bands like Radiohead and The Flaming Lips.

While I've always appreciated the idea of the experimental side of the beatles the result was just drug fuelled sonic masterbation. Also if it wasn't them who broke the mould someone else would, they were not the only musical experimenters back then.

In regards to star wars, yes all that is true but… it isn't sci fi. it's LOTR dressed in sci fi clothes.

3D? what he said.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
DAJB at 7:05AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 1,462
joined: 2-23-2007
Genejoke
as above!
I'm not trying to argue you should like them. That's always going to be a matter of personal taste.

My point is rather that, when something is “epically acclaimed” (be it a game or a movie or a group), it's not necessarily just because they were the very first or the very best, but often it also has a lot to do with the extent of their influence on what followed. Like them or not, no one had as much influence as The Beatles.

Looking back, it's harder for us to see that influence because we're now surrounded by the end result of it. The current state of music or gaming is seen as the norm, so the spark that started it all off looks dated and unoriginal.

Think of Pong. Is there anything more mind-numbingly dumb? And yet where would today's tennis games (or even the annual FIFA and PES releases, or all the golf and hockey games!) be without that “epically acclaimed” masterpiece?!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:04PM
Genejoke at 7:51AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
I don't disagree about the influence, I never referred to the as dated or unoriginal. My problem with the beatles and most of these things is that there is this stupid mentality that you have to like them and respect them.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
DAJB at 8:18AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 1,462
joined: 2-23-2007
Genejoke
I don't disagree about the influence, I never referred to the as dated or unoriginal. My problem with the beatles and most of these things is that there is this stupid mentality that you have to like them and respect them.
Fair enough. I agree no one should have to like and/or respect anything.

Except maybe Pong!
;-)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:04PM
ozoneocean at 8:54AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 24,789
joined: 1-2-2006
Genejoke
Also if it wasn't them who broke the mould someone else would, they were not the only musical experimenters back then.
That's perfectly true. And if it wasn't for he Beatles then a lot of other great stuff would've had a chance to really shine and get as fully famous as it should have been- The Zombies, Love, Caravan, The Soft Machine, Gentle Giant etc.

But then they didn't and the Beatles WERE a massive influence. No changing history. :)
——————————–

There are a lot of acclaimed popular things that I don't get, mainly because I have no interest in getting into them…. SO it's not honest for me to rant about them.
These things include but are not limited to (haha lawyer language):
Harry Potter books and movies, the Alien movies (I have seen many of these actually), Radiohead, The Butthole Surfers, anything by Steven King, Firefly…
——————————–

One thing I DID try and see what all the fuss was about and still didn't get into was the author Michael Morcock, specifically his Elric books.
-I read ALL the Elric books as well as a lot of other Morcock stuff, especially his Eternal Hero related books that are a big part of the Elric “multiverse”.
-I get why teenagers would like Elric; he's a stroppy, grumpy antihero who isn't the strongest guy, he's a skinny albino instead of buff and tanned, he has a magic sword that does his fighting for him, he has lots of secret, demonic knowledge, he has a fate he can't escape, he's amazingly awesome…

But he's DULL. He's a whinny little Mary Sue! He was Morcock's deliberate reaction to stuff like Narnia, the Lord of the Rings, Conan, Fafard and the Grey Mouser etc, but I've also read all of those and they're a million times better written and way more fun! Elric is a floppy little flaccid penis. The stories remind me of nothing so much as the very bad heavy Metal from the 80's that was also aimed as disaffected nerdy teens who wanted to hear songs about magically awesome death dealing anti-heroes.
Morcocks' other writing is at least somewhat entertaining, and he has a brilliant imagination throughout. The problem is that even though his ideas are massive he's not very good and fleshing them out into something that feels real. Too much of Morcock's amazing worlds feeling like nothing more than really well painted 2D backdrops.

I see and acknowledge where and Elric has had huge influence though:
A lot of nerdy metal, many anti-hero comics, dark gritty “low” fantasy novels… He's very much responsible for the whole “chaos” theme in scfi and fantasy and especially responsible for that aspect of the popular Warhammer and Warhammer 40k universes and the projects that has influenced.

…But I can't see why the Elric series gets the acclaim that it does. There has always been better stuff out there on the same themes, and as I've said; the work that it was written in reaction to is actually far better.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:37PM
Genejoke at 9:17AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
Never read Elric, always meant to. Did read the Dorian Hawkmoon novels, those were fun, short and they didn't out stay their welcome. I wouldn't call them classics by any stretch of the imagination though.

Novels I find harder to knock, Stephen King I suppose, but I do like a few of his works. mostly the short stories.

Some novels I find hard going because of the time and writing style. The count of monte cristo springs to mind. I can't think of any I have read that are widely acclaimed that I didn't like.

You will never catch me reading the shite they pump out at this time of year about pointless celebrities. Well, I did read a Jeremy Clarkson book last year and enjoyed it but I think that is the exception to the rule.

last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
Hawk at 9:37AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 2,760
joined: 1-2-2006
You know that thing you guys all really liked? I hated it. I saw right through all the hype and had the courage to not like it.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:47PM
Genejoke at 9:41AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
Hawk
You know that thing you guys all really liked? I hated it. I saw right through all the hype and had the courage to not like it.

Sex?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
Hawk at 10:14AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 2,760
joined: 1-2-2006
Yes, sex. And Avatar.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:47PM
Abt_Nihil at 10:21AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(offline)
posts: 1,212
joined: 8-7-2007
Genejoke
Hawk
You know that thing you guys all really liked? I hated it. I saw right through all the hype and had the courage to not like it.

Sex?
lol!

DAJB
3D movies
YES.

As for me:

Hans Zimmer and the Hans-Zimmer-style of scoring movies. It seems incredibly popular with a lot of people, but… I like to have actual melodies and not just endless string pizzicatos that don't go anywhere (best/worst example would be his Batman scores, which I found to be painfully mediocre… especially compared to what Danny Elfman did on the Tim Burton movies, or what Shirley Walker and colleagues did on the Batman Animated Series). And whenever he doesn't do his stereotypical pizzicatos, he does the most uncreative pompous melodies known to modern cinema (Pirates of the Carribbean…).

I LOVE movie scores, and my love for them goes way back. When I was a kid, I realized how differently Duck Tales and Tiny Toon Adventures were scored, compared to what I'd seen before. They had these grand orchestral scores - which was amazing, considering most people back then would probably consider spending money on scoring cartoons wasted. Back To The Future impressed me a lot, and I still love this sort of score. Not to mention the groundbreaking Star Wars score! And I could go on and on…

I'm not making a case against more “modern” movie scores. I just can't see how you can like Hans Zimmer's style of scoring movies… which is being adopted by every other soundtrack composer these days. Ugh.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:44AM
Genejoke at 10:27AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,031
joined: 4-9-2010
Hawk
Yes, sex. And Avatar.

I don't consider avatar epically acclaimed, sure the visuals got a lot of praise but overall it has a lot of hate.


Hans zimmer… yeah not big fan either and the POTC score sounds very much like a lot of his other stuff.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
Faliat at 10:57AM, Dec. 9, 2010
(online)
posts: 582
joined: 10-17-2006
You can say whatever you want about who was influencial or not. But I think Star Trek influenced more modern sci-fi than Star Wars and I don't think the Beatles would've had much of an impact on electronic and hip hop music. Both of those obviously getting more out of the 30s than the 60s.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
meemjar at 12:13PM, Dec. 9, 2010
(offline)
posts: 146
joined: 12-10-2008
So-called Classic movies!

Gone with the Wind
Casablanca
The Maltese Falcon
Citizen Kane

Ho-hum, I just can't get into them. For some reason they just don't WOW me.
I watched them on VHS and would have to stop the film and go busy myself with something else and come back to it later…several times.
In other words I watched them on a matter of principle just to say I watched them.

But give me the B-movies from that time period any day.
King Kong
Frankenstein
Charlie Chan
The Three Stooges

In fact I introduced my young nephew to the Marx Brothers and Abbott & Costello.
He could NOT stop laughing at the zany actions of Bud & Lou and Groucho and his brothers.
These guys have a NEW generation of fans.
Classic comedies NEVER get stale.
And while the old horror films aren't scary anymore they still have the atmospheric feel to them.
Furthermore while the old horror films also got sequelled to death like modern horror films, each sequel at least told a stand-alone story as opposed to the constant re-hashing the Freddy and Jason movies get. They go through the same exact routine in every one of their pictures.
But ‘Bride of Frankenstein’ told a totally different story than ‘Son of Frankenstein.’ ;)
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:58PM

Forgot Password
©2011 WOWIO, Inc. All Rights Reserved