Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Fight scenes
mattwandcow at 6:30PM, March 20, 2008
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Ookay. I have a new question to ask the gurus who live somewhere in here.

Fight scenes.

Swords, guns, fisticuffs, whatever. How do people like you draw these things/ i can draw a bit of lame stuff(and I'm not sure what I need)

Any tips people can give on how they do them would be excellent. it can be anything from “How I drew page 29 of my frikin awesome comic” or “Pause the Matrix during action scenes and sketch”

I just want to know how YOU do yours….
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
lba at 8:28PM, March 20, 2008
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Use gesture lines. Draw with one line the entire pose that you want your character in. Don't take your pencil off the paper. Make it nice and flowing. I do that before every drawing of a person or animal I do and then draw over top of it. It helps get the proper tension in a characters body movements for the action it's doing. You can use it on any drawing too, not just action shots.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:29PM
Frostflowers at 2:02AM, March 21, 2008
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Seconding Iba.

Also, to get a more dynamic sense of motion on the page, exaggerate camera angles and perspective, and play around with panel-shapes. Characters breaking through the borders of panels can be a nice trick.
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
mlai at 7:32AM, March 21, 2008
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Frame advance thru a good actiony anime, and copy.

Animation cels routinely exaggerate proportions and perspective (in a good way). It's an animation technique. So not only will you learn how to draw flowing motion, you also learn forshortening and perspective.

I recommend Yu Yu Hakusho. Or Naruto. Believe it.

FIGHT current chapter: Filling In The Gaps
FIGHT_2 current chapter: Light Years of Gold
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:06PM
Daiconv at 10:17AM, March 21, 2008
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Really good fight scenes require a lot of planning. You have to take a lot of things into consideration, like the purpose of the fight, what's at stake, and how the results of the fight are going to effect the rest of the story.

looking at animation and kung fu movies helps, but it only gets you so far since your laying this out on a comic page and your characters aren't moving. So I would suggest studying scenes in comics which you would consider to have awesome fight scenes and try to get an idea of how they go about conveying movement.

conveying movement and kinetic energy are the most important parts of a good fight scene.

But basically, I think it's a balance of really strong action poses and good page layouts.
without buttcheecks, it's just a hole.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:03PM
Naughtelos at 10:29AM, March 21, 2008
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It all takes a good grasp of “what's going on” in the fight scene, and how to divide that into panels, to give the reader the same idea. And, (I had to learn this the hard way), you don't need a one-liner in every panel. After about four almost groan-worthy ones arranged consecutively, it sounds dumb. Now, by no means should you not use them, a One-Liner is essential for a good one. Hope that helps.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:09PM
mattwandcow at 12:32PM, March 21, 2008
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Hmm… My main concern is that I'm not using panels for this arc. I'm doing single pages. I have to figure out if I want to just skip the action, or drag it out or what….
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
Frostflowers at 4:30AM, March 22, 2008
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mattwandcow
Hmm… My main concern is that I'm not using panels for this arc. I'm doing single pages. I have to figure out if I want to just skip the action, or drag it out or what….
If you're doing single panels, then try to boil the action down to the most decisive moments; the instant when the fist hits the face, rather than the moment when it's still inches away. Focus on impact, motion and the moments that decide the outcome of the fight.

How much dialogue are you going to have?

While we're on fighting/action-sequences, I can recommend browsing through action which is a completely wordless, single-panel comic with a lot of motion in it.
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
Ryuthehedgewolf at 5:52PM, March 22, 2008
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Personally, I've found that having nice poses and ‘animation’ really helps the flow of battle.

Like, when a character is shooting a gun, have them take the gun out of the holster, or whatever but draw Action lines.

Just study a few Marvel comic books, or something that has a lot of action, it usually helps.

Usually meaning most of the time.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:15PM
Highwind017 at 11:48AM, April 11, 2008
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Im not a expert of fight scenes (LOC hasnt gone to a main fight scene yet…) So im listening to this.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:48PM
mattwandcow at 1:13PM, April 11, 2008
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I ended up without any fights, just a few brandished weapons. If you assume oyu audience is intelligent, you can skip a lot of stuff.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
kyupol at 4:20PM, April 11, 2008
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first of all, I think you need to get down the character's fighting abilities or special powers or any of that.

Can he fly? Does he have super speed? Super strength? shooting fireballs from his ass? What are other qualifications? What kind of martial arts does he do and what is his skill level? There are all kinds of stuff to consider.

And what about the weakness? Is there a weak point in the armor? a psychological weakness? a cryptonite sort of thing?


Also I say that motion blurs, and speed lines are your friend (I brought this up before and there was disagreement on this but I feel this is a good method for fight scenes if you dont overdo it).

Another thing I'd like to mention is getting those bendable action figures. At least the elbows and knees should be bendable and there should be a ball joint in the arms and the legs to allow more rotation. A spiderman action figure would help.


In my opinion, these are the fight scenes that are ranked from EASIEST to HARDEST to do.

1) “Mage” fights. All about blasting stuff at each other.
2) Choreographed karate fight. Especially in those Asian movies.
3) Grappling fights. Tie this up with man-vs-beast.
4) Martial arts fight where both combatants are attacking simultaneously in the same panel.
5) massive battle of armies. The more combatants involved, the harder it is.
NOW UPDATING!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:26PM
theRedDeath at 11:57AM, April 18, 2008
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One thing i always try to remember, is that you never show the actual point of impact in a fight. Meaning, never show the exact moment when the fist hits the face, or the sword slashes the chest etc. etc. Always frame it just before the action, or just after the action. The reader's mind will fill in the gaps, and the pacing well seem all the more fast and intense because of it.

last edited on July 14, 2011 4:28PM

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