Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Has Anyone Tried Out Wacom Bamboo?
Eunice P at 3:56PM, Dec. 25, 2007
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Has anyone tried out Wacom Bamboo before? Is it better than Intuous?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:23PM
gigatwo at 6:11PM, Dec. 25, 2007
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I'm stuck with my graphire 3. Oh well.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:36PM
angry_black_guy at 6:15PM, Dec. 25, 2007
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It's just like any other tablet I've used except the stylus is a magnet or something and doesn't require batteries (like some Tablets I've used).

My main beef with Wacom is that they always bundle their tablets with useless garbage that you don't need which jacks the price up. I managed to find a Bamboo Lite… which is the exact same as the other versions except it doesn't come with a pile of useless programs and it's 50 bux cheaper.

In all honesty, if you want a good tablet experience, just buy a Tablet PC from Toshiba (or buy one off ebay). They usually run about 200-300 American smackers and they're laptops specifically designed to be used as tablets. The screens are usually 12-15" and while the specs are generally week (usually 1ghz with 512mb of ram and a 32mb graphics card) it's just enough power to run Photoshop or Painter and it's almost ten times cheaper than Wacom's gigantic computer screen tablet thing.

Plus it's portable.

last edited on July 14, 2011 10:52AM
acadia at 9:16AM, Dec. 26, 2007
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angry_black_guy
It's just like any other tablet I've used except the stylus is a magnet or something and doesn't require batteries (like some Tablets I've used).

My main beef with Wacom is that they always bundle their tablets with useless garbage that you don't need which jacks the price up. I managed to find a Bamboo Lite… which is the exact same as the other versions except it doesn't come with a pile of useless programs and it's 50 bux cheaper.

In all honesty, if you want a good tablet experience, just buy a Tablet PC from Toshiba (or buy one off ebay). They usually run about 200-300 American smackers and they're laptops specifically designed to be used as tablets. The screens are usually 12-15" and while the specs are generally week (usually 1ghz with 512mb of ram and a 32mb graphics card) it's just enough power to run Photoshop or Painter and it's almost ten times cheaper than Wacom's gigantic computer screen tablet thing.

Plus it's portable.

OR you could just shell out for a good Intuos. Sure, it comes with useless shit, but the tablet itself is top-notch. With a tablet pc, you're limited to the performance of that pc, whereas with a tablet you can connect it to your main computer. Photoshop may RUN on a 1ghz processor with 512mb of ram, but it doesn't run well.

last edited on July 14, 2011 10:45AM
cetriya at 11:02AM, Dec. 26, 2007
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realy, as a hobbiest, if you havent gotten the graphire then get the bamboo. It might just feel smoother. the thing is, tablets are easier then mouse.

Start with small then build up
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:39AM
Eunice P at 3:35AM, Dec. 27, 2007
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Hmm… Guess I'll invest money on Intuous. Actually, I was curious about the usefulness of Bamboo after I saw the Wacom Bamboo Fun was packaged with comic softwares.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:23PM
Luminous at 3:55PM, Dec. 29, 2007
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I've got a Bamboo, and it's a pretty darn good little tablet. If you need a tablet, but don't want to shell out the hundreds of bucks for an Intuos, then I would most definitely recommend a Wacom Bamboo. It's reliable, sensitive (for the price), and easy to work with (in my opinion). If you're looking for a starter tablet and you're not sure if you need something super sensitive like the Intuos, I'd definitely recommend the Bamboo.

Of course, if you're a bit more “advanced” or know you DO need the super-sensitivity of the Intuos, then, well, invest in an Intuos.

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last edited on July 14, 2011 1:49PM
teedomoonstrider at 2:29PM, Jan. 4, 2008
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I got the Bamboo Fun Medium size, and it's working very well for me. The pen feels right and doesn't require batteries, and the pad itself is pretty responsive. Of course I'm new at all of this, so YMMV.
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Wang.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:08PM
Frae at 3:28PM, Feb. 11, 2008
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I actually got my wacom bamboo tablet for only 100 bucks brand new. I got it from Best Buy.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:30PM
ShadowsMyst at 11:49AM, Feb. 13, 2008
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*coughs*

Okay, just so you know, here's the skinny on tablets.

I've used them all except the Cintiq (thats the one that's actually a display). I've owned a Graphire 2, 3, and have had an Intuos 2 and 3 at work. I've played with the Bamboo at the store, so I have a fairly good gyst of what it feels like. Its also important in terms of features to differentiate between the bamboo and bamboo ‘fun’ models. There are differences.

Bamboo
- Is much lighter and plasticy. Feels cheap.
- 512 levels of pressure sensitivity ( for the pen only on the bamboo, the bamboo fun supports both the pen and eraser.)
- Does not support “tilt” functionality
- The bamboo itself only comes in ‘small’ size. This forces the use of more finger movement rather than arm movement and can tax the wrist for drawing. The surface is also very hard and ‘smooth’ comparatively, which results in the need to press much harder for control of the wrist.
- Does not support application specific settings to the tablet.
- No alternate pen support
- resolution of 2,540 LPI (lines per inch)
- Has a control ‘ring’ and some shortcut buttons.

The Graphire (currently available model is a bluetooth wireless model) is very similar in terms of features to the bamboo fun. However, its a bit more solid of a tablet with more weight, and is of course, wireless. It does lack some of the control strips and buttons present. It supports the same levels of pressure sensitivity, and resolution. It feels more ‘solid’ in terms of its construction, but it still suffers from the being fairly small and smooth, which still does tax the wrists when drawing.

The Intuos however, is a significantly different beast.
- Supports 1,024 levels of pressure sensitivity (Pen & Eraser), literally double the amount on a graphire or Bamboo. The difference is AMAZING. Its very ‘soft’ to draw on, allowing for finer lines, less pressure, which results in less fatigue of the wrists. This results in much better control artistically.
- Supports ‘tilt’ functionality on a pen. If you turn your pen a bit, like a real pencil, you can get strokes that take advantage of this, making much more natural lines.
-with 5,080 Lines per inch it has double the resolution of the other tablets.
- Supports alternate pens, such as the airbrush pen, “6D” art pen, the inking pen, and a couple more.
- Comes with two control strips and eight programable buttons.
- Avaliable in many sizes, up to 12 x19, alowing for a much larger drawing surface, which allows for the entire use of the arm, resulting in greater control of the tablet by the user, especially those used to working on more traditional surfaces.
-Feels very solid and well made. Drawing surface is more soft and ‘toothy’ than others.
- Usually comes with a fair amount of free software, spare nibs for the pen, and a few other goodies.
- Comes with a longer USB cable.

As a professional artist, HANDS DOWN, I'd recommend the Intuos over ANY other tablet. Spend the money, its worth it. The Bamboo strikes me as a cheap either ‘kiddie’ tablet, or as a cheap alternate interface for those who need to do a lot of writing (like teachers) and find the mouse cumbersome, or who suffer from wrist problems. As an artist working on a small, hard, and smooth tablet, I'd say it'll either make your wrists superhuman or destroy them. I know I found with mine that the small drawing surface, combined with how hard I had to press to get control, I would find my hands aching after only a few hours of drawing on the computer. With the Intuos, even the Intuos 2, I never have that problem. The larger size also makes a difference to me, allowing me to do smoother curves and lines by allowing more arm movement and superior tracking.

When my graphire 3 bit it, I swore I'd not buy another tablet until I can get the intuos. Period. I'm still waiting on my tax return so I can do so. I feel that strongly about it.

Of course, everyone's situation is unique. Wacom actually had a little tablet wizard to figure out what would be ideal for your situation.
http://www.wacom.com/tabletwizard/

For webcomics, I'd probably pick “fine artist” as my type to start.

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last edited on July 14, 2011 3:32PM

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