Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

How do you do your comic?
WingNut at 9:50AM, Dec. 14, 2006
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Hiya Folks, Wing here, and I just wanted to know the various ways people go about doing their comics.

For me, a ton of it's by hand. First off, using graph paper, I sketch out the layout and text for the comic, just so I can get the basic page setting up. Next, using a light 4h-or higher pencil, I sketch the comic at about 200% size on bristol board.

After everything is set the way I'd like, I ink my comic with a set of pens ranging from .7mm to .1mm, and a set of black markers for the solid blacks. First I outline my characters with a thicker line, (most likely .7) this causes the characters to stand out more. After that, using a thiner line (.5 or .3) I ink the details on each character. I do NOT outline the borders or boxes in my comic, I wait to do that in adobe illustrator.

Next, after erasing all my sketchy pencil drawings, I cut out the comic from the bristol, and scan it. Usually, I have to paste the two comics together because my scanner is tiny and crappy. :P After that, I import the program into adobe streamline. I used to re-ink everything digitally in illustrator using my tablet, but I could tell that it wasn't done by hand and it just wasn't doing it for me. But now, that I'm inking by hand, adobe streamline works great.

After that, I import it into adobe illustrator, and fix any lines I might have missed before. Also, now is the time that I add the borders, text, and speech bubbles, each on a separate layer, that way I can color over the border, for line-breaks and other such effects.

Next, we import into photoshop, at CMYK coloring, and 300dpi and begin the oh so boring flatting process, or assigning the basic colors. Coloring is my least favorite phase in a comic, and it seems to take forever. On a separate layer, using both the magic wand and lasso tool, I fill in the areas of color on the characters. I have a separate file which has all the colors I use in each character so that makes it a lot easier. After that, on another layer, I add the shades and highlights. This is done using the ‘painter brush’ -

and going over the colors with an increasingly smaller and darker/lighter brush. I usually use about 2/3 layers of light and shade for each hue, depending on where the light is hitting. After that, I'm pretty much done! I flatten, change to RGB, and resize for the web, and SHAZAM!

Another comic for Acquired Taste.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:50PM
Darth Mongoose at 12:53PM, Dec. 14, 2006
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Start off with a normal piece of printer paper, clip it to my Dad's old rotaring drawing board. I draw everything on one page with a 0.5mm hb mech pencil. Next I ink it with a few different fineliner pens. I use a 0.2mm, 0.5mm and a 0.8mm.
Rub out all the underlying pencil after inking, when get out my big bag ‘o copic markers and colour everything that isn’t a really big area or something that'll need CG effects.
Scan it at 300dpi, add in cg effects, then speech bubbles, text, sound effects, make sure the contrast is nice and clean. size it down to 150dpi so the file isn't huge, then size it to 620px wide so it fits on the screen nicely. Upload and write a navel-gazing rant. Easy.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Aeon at 2:17PM, Dec. 14, 2006
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At one point I was sketching Nancy on sketchbook paper, then scanning it in and inking/toning digitally using Painter 8. Lately, I've just been cutting out the middle man and doing the whole thing in Painter and Photoshop Elements.

Working at about 300% size in a premade six panel template, I start doing very broad sketching, just to get a sense of the layout. I figure out where voice bubbles are going to go, and if the gag calls for me to merge two panels together to create one big one. Then, on the same layer, I go back in and start getting some details in, especially things I can't freehand immediately, like hands and facial expressions on Nancy and Arandu. Emp I usually just draw as a circle with two triangles, and he goes straight from that phase to final ink.

When I'm done sketching I reduce the opacity of the sketch layer to around 30%, then create a new layer and I go in with the Fine Point pen tool (set to around 1.4 pixels) and start inking. It's pretty tedious.

When that's done, I make the sketch layer invisible, and add some new layers for color… usually one for characters and one for background. Before I start coloring, I turn each panel into a selection, and set it to mask anything not selected. That way, I dont' have to worry about coloring inside the panel borders. I mix up the order, but generally I'll go in and do backgrounds first, filling in large areas of color with the Pen> Flat Color tool. Backgrounds are shaded using the Airbrush> Soft Airbrush 50 tool.

On the character color layer, I go in again with the flat color tool and fill things in. I generally do all I need to do in one color (like coloring Nancy's hair in every panel, then coloring Nancy's skin in every panel…) rather than coloring each panel fully, then moving on to the next.

When all the coloring is done, I save it as a Painter file (.rif), then as a Photoshop file (.psd,) then I move the whole thing into Photoshop Elements, where I resize it to 900 px wide, then add text and speech bubbles.

Whew. It sounds so complicated. Why do I do this again?
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:46AM
Beaums at 7:53PM, Dec. 14, 2006
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I plan to do a professional write-up on how I create my comics one day, but I guess it couldn't hurt to post a little preliminary draft here. Plus, it's going to take me ages to figure out how to add extra pages to my webcomic homepage with text and pictures, so it couldn't hurt to reveal my process in the forums first. See! I plan ahead sometimes! I don't ALWAYS just lay back and go with the flow!

Okay, my comic making process is totally old school. The only thing digital about it is the fact that I scan my comics onto the computer and make them “webcomics”. It's a shame too, because I'm missing out on all that marvelous technology! I don't use a tablet, I don't use Photoshop (though I plan to receive it for Christmas), I don't use Flash (though I DO own it) and I barely resize any of my comics! I know, I know… I bring shame to the name “webcomic”, just don't hurt me.

Anyways, comics always start off with an idea, and mine is no exception. As soon as I think of a scenario, a joke, a situation, whatever, I write it down. Some stuff is straight from my life; some is straight out of my twisted head. Sometimes, the comic just comes to me as I draw. Whatever the case, I eventually get an idea, write it down and like it to some sort of punch line. After that, I start the actual comic with a horribly rough, sketchy, rushed preliminary comic done on a lined piece of 8 x 11 paper straight out of my school binders. This comic looks God awful, but proves itself extremely helpful in the long run. It helps me work out the dialogue, the pacing, character positions, character expressions, camera angles, speech balloon positions, sound effect positions, gags, etc. Once I'm satisfied with the rough draft, I grab a plain piece of 8 x 11 printing paper (nothing special) and I begin the final draft. When it comes to the layout of my webcomic, (panels, gutters, borders, titles, etc.), I have a pre-made template which I trace onto my clean sheet. Once the panels are up, I begin the bulk of my work. This includes drawing all my characters, speech bubbles, sound effects, backgrounds, etc. This is all done with a 0.5 mm mechanical pencil and will take me a good couple of hours straight. When the pencils look good, I begin the inking stage using my Pigma Micron pens ranging from 0.05 to 0.8 mm in thickness. ALL inking is done with these pens; nothing is left up to my computer. Next comes the truly frightening experience, erasing. One of my biggest fears is messing up with the erasing and bending or ripping the sheet of paper. Anyways, if my comic survives, it is finished and ready for its big debut! After reading over it and picking up any missed pencil lines, etc. I scan it up to my downstairs computer. On this computer I save it to my Under Management folder, and resize it to 650 x 841, which are the set dimensions for my comic. (Believe me, this isn't much of a resize. It's probably only 98% of the actual copy.) My webcomic is then emailed to my upstairs computer, where I post it up on Drunk Duck and write something long, boring and hate-fueled, undoubtedly putting readers to sleep.

After my comic has been scanned and posted, it is stored securely in my extra-special binder, where I keep ALL of my originals. I didn't actually intend for Under Management to be a webcomic, it's only since October that that thought came to my mind. My real goal is to get them all made into some sort of book and sold. (Of course, achieving webcomic fame wouldn't be so bad either. ;)) And that's how I DO my comic. They're quite long projects, which I have never actually completed in one day. I probably could, if I found one whole free day, but those are rare at best. I do need to figure out how to make the whole process less time-consuming though. I'm still in high school, so finding spare time can get considerably difficult. I'll find some shortcuts eventually!

I write too damn much…

last edited on July 14, 2011 11:15AM
kingofsnake at 9:59AM, Dec. 15, 2006
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The way I do comics has changed drastically over time but basically it's this. We start off with a joke or a phrase or a situation that we like, that may or may not fit into a storyline. The go into one of like a thousand notebooks, or just into the back of my noodle in the form of an entire webcomic in stick figure form, or just a dialogue, or sometimes just a word or phrase that's supposed to remind me of the whole scenario. For example I was going through one of my older notebooks the other day and I found the phrase “Promote World Hunger” with no recollection as to what it referred. These usually fester for another 6 to 8 months before we have the opportunity to use them in the storyline. At which point they come out and are storyboarded into both a written dialogue and a stick figure storyboard. Jokes are usually revised to be severely different than their original incarnation, usually a lot of jokes are completely scrapped, or turned into panel 2 or 3 jokes (I'm all about the 1-2 jab on comics rather than the set'em up, knock'em down style.)

Then the drawing commences. I use a ruler to make inch lines on a sheet of Bristol board, so I can gauge character's heights. I then draw each figure for each panel with a 3H or a 4H. I scan them into Paintshop Pro and use the vector function to draw and color each figure, I usually do the black outline first and then all of the other lines are darker variations of the colors that will be behind them. I keep a spec sheet on all my characters handy so I can maintain the same colors all the way through. For backgrounds I take photos of a college campus. I then use the photo as a reference and draw a pencil version, that is slightly more stylistic and cartoony. I ink over the outlines for this and color everything with a flat color or gradient that doesn't adhere the outlines, then I transfer everything to a crayon texture I created by filling in most of a page of paper with a solid color. I can tweak colors from here but the textures are all so large I have to save each image as an additional compressed file. So I'll have one picture prior to texturing that I can edit colors, and backgrounds for daytime and season changes, and one base picture I can use for the backgrounds of my comics. Often I'll do a panoramic style background so I can have characters travel across it, or use different sections of it. After all this I transfer the different models onto a layer on top of the background, I usually have to shrink the backgrounds down to 10-15% and the characters 10-25%. Occasionally I'll do a panel that doesn't use a separate layer for the foreground and the background, but that is all one picture, those are drawn all at once and then inked all at once, they are also saved in 2 forms, the non-textured and the complete. Then I layout panels and word bubbles, and put it all together. Even the simplest comic takes me hours upon hours this way, but I love how they look and I don't have the scratch to get a program or a tablet that could do the same thing in a less time consuming fashion.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:15PM
anystar at 1:51PM, Dec. 15, 2006
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I'm actually going to make a tutorial for how I make my stuff @_@; one day. I had a really old one before, but I deleted it cause it was just..blah XD
http://www.drunkduck.com/The_Door_in_the_Rock/ >> Fantasy Graphic Novel in Black and White :3
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:54AM
strong414bad at 5:29PM, Dec. 15, 2006
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First I wait months coming up with any idea for my story. Then I spend another month writing a full script of everything anybody does. Then I draw concept art, choose which art I want in my comic, and begin sketching. I re-sketch three times to make sure everything is perfect, then I ink the whole thing by hand. Then I scan it and make serious retouches with only MS paint and with my hands tied behind my back.
Why hello there.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:59PM
WingNut at 6:49PM, Dec. 15, 2006
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I just died a little inside.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:50PM
Green_Tangerine at 10:46PM, Dec. 15, 2006
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I sketch everything with a 0.5mm mech pencil, and ink with 0.2mm and 0.5mm staedtler pens. Erase, scan at 300 dpi, bla bla. I clean up the image in Photoshop first, as I tend to draw in my lap and there's usually some small mistakes.
I increase the canvas size and move the images around until I can use the line function to create panels big enough to contain dialogue bubbles. For backgrounds, I usually either snag a picture off of Google images or take one myself and use the ‘cutout’ filter set to 8 layers, and then the ‘find edges’ filter and stick it on a layer behind the characters. I sometimes draw them, though.
I have a color palette I keep handy for each character, use the fill function, and then burn (set to midtones, 30%) and highlight (set to shadow, 15%) for shading and highlights.
Then on to dialogue- position the text and create a rounded rectangle behind it in white. Create the points using the line function, flatten the layers and fill in the space created between the lines.
Resize the image to 690 pixels wide, resize the canvas to 700 pixels wide and fill in with black to create a border.
Voila! Then it sits on my desktop until I can think of something funny to say in my author's comments. I usually give up on that part, though.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:38PM
LunarYouko at 4:23PM, Dec. 16, 2006
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Most of my work is done on the computer in Photoshop 7. I've found I like to sketch the pages by hand though, as it gives me better perspective on the porportions and placement of characters and text. Then I scan and do all the inking in photoshop. I don't do my comics in color yet, because of time constrants…. maybe some time in the future.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:49PM
strong414bad at 7:33PM, Dec. 16, 2006
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WingNut


I just died a little inside.

What? That's how I do it.
Why hello there.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:59PM
kaminari at 10:41PM, Dec. 16, 2006
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I open Excel and create random panels based on an idea I have for the page.

I print it on plain ole computer paper… usually while Im a work…
Then I draw the page I had in my head with light sketches in each panel (and sometimes I just start drawing without sketching) with my trusty standard #2 bic mechanical pencil. When Im done, I scan it at 100dpi into paint shop pro 10.
I cant scan it any bigger because I use a 7 year old laptop which really doesnt have the memory to even run the program so I have to make sure that absolutely no other programs are running.
First I adjust highlight/midtone/shadow to create nice dark lines (cg inking is too much for my poor memory and actually inking it would take me too long).
Then a little brightness and contrast adjustment to clean it up.
I create a layer over the image and do flatting using my cheap Wacom tablet. I keep the previous page open so I can quickly grab the color scheme.

Then I use the lighten/darken brush at various opacities for highlights followed by the smudge brush to blend the colors giving the page more of a soft shading style, but sometime I leave a hard edge.
I try to use only one layer because if I add another.. well… I might as well quit working because PSP sure will.

Usually this is where I clean up the original image layer with the brushes.
Already the previous steps have taken about 2 days so I get lazy and clean up the most glaring problems.


My text bubbles are lame preset shapes in PSP. They open as small vector layers, which are fine most of the time, and I turn the transparency to 69 from 100 so the covered-up art can be seen. I use a font everyone hates.. but I dont really care..
I feel its better to be legible than difficult to read for some people or just too out of place for the comic.

With everything merged and resized about 50%, I add black borders and save it as .png or high quality .jpg


ummm, I think that covers it just about *nod*

I am FS2 champion! w00t!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:13PM
Green_Tangerine at 12:47AM, Dec. 17, 2006
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strong414bad
WingNut


I just died a little inside.

What? That's how I do it.

I think he means it's a very simple process in comparison with what some others have to go through to produce a strip.

… to each his own?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:38PM
AQua_ng at 3:58AM, Dec. 17, 2006
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Idea in shower.

Doodle on scrap paper with normal pencil (RECYCLING FOR THE WIN!).

Scan.

Trace, colour, background and text on Macromedia Flash.


Ta-da.

K.A.L.A-dan! Brigade Captain :D
K.A.L.A.-dan forums!
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:55AM
strong414bad at 4:53PM, Dec. 17, 2006
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Green_Tangerine
I think he means it's a very simple process in comparison with what some others have to go through to produce a strip.

… to each his own?

I added more steps.
Why hello there.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:59PM
c5comics at 9:31PM, Dec. 18, 2006
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I do a strip comic, so I use MS Word and plan out my panels according to the script. Then I print it out on an 8 1/2 x 11 papers in landscape usually. Then I use a mechanical pencil .7mm, then pen in the pencil. I erase the lines then scan the page into my computer. I may use Photoshop or GIMP in the clean up or may even use paint to put in the speech balloons and lettering. After all that I send it to my colorist. That's pretty much it.

c5comics
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:35AM
WingNut at 3:54AM, Dec. 19, 2006
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Green_Tangerine
strong414bad
WingNut


I just died a little inside.

What? That's how I do it.

I think he means it's a very simple process in comparison with what some others have to go through to produce a strip.

… to each his own?

Yeah, thats what I meant. For me, the entire process takes around eight hours of solid work. If I'm lucky, I might shave it down to six, but that usually means I'm tired and leaving out a few steps. The sad part is, I'm tearing my hair out over details that most people won't notice, but the people who DO notice are the people who know what they're looking for, and they are the one's I want to impress.

Eight hours man, I could beat so many video games in that time span, so many books I could read, but no, the elusive act of perfecting my art keeps me chained to my drawing table.

I love it so.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:50PM
kingofsnake at 9:15AM, Dec. 19, 2006
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lemme see, my next comic, so far has taken me… 16 hours, not including writing phase. I still have to ink two pictures, do a background, and put the whole thing together. I tend to do FAR more work than is needed too. I do all this work on details that end up getting cropped out anyway. Guessing another 4 hours would be probably undershooting it. I was hoping to get it done tonite, but with christmas shopping, I doubt it. But then like alot of my comics this is much longer than a regular comic, it's 8 panels. so, translate that to a four panel comic and I only got like 8 hours for it, with another 2 to go.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:15PM
Green_Tangerine at 3:48PM, Dec. 19, 2006
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WingNut
Eight hours man, I could beat so many video games in that time span, so many books I could read, but no, the elusive act of perfecting my art keeps me chained to my drawing table.

I love it so.

From start to finish, I think a strip usually takes around 4 hours. It's kind of hard to judge because I'll sketch a few, then ink them another day, then all the digital yet another time. I'm starting to get faster on the sketching stage- I used to need every line perfect (in my eyes) before I'd think of inking. Now, not so much. I can kind of wing it a bit more.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:38PM
shadowmagi at 7:54PM, Dec. 19, 2006
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I do everything by hand, save a few fix ups on the computer.

First, I do a rough layout of the page and where i want all the panels to be, then i write in all my text and outline my panel borders in ink. then i do rough pencil sketches of the characters/everything else, and ink. for final touches, i take a handy-dandy black prismacolor marker and use it wherever i see fit.

… really, very little beforehand planning xD I usually just go with what feels right for the page and then go about my merry way :P Let the muse run free! bwhahaha!

Overall, it usually takes 5-10 per page i think o_0

*Psst*
….
(i like feedback~!)
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:32PM
acadia at 7:48AM, Dec. 20, 2006
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First, i open up my little sketch book thing and do a really REALLY rough outline of the panel placement and character placement. Then i get out my tablet, plug it in, and do a low opacity soft brush duplicate on the computer (too lazy to scan). After that, i make another layer, make the brush a little harder and sketch out the details, the background, the speech bubble placement, etc. After all this, i get down to what you'll actually see. I do some quick background paintings (i do it machall style, quick, but detailed, no outlines) to set the stage. After that, i change to my standard 5pt hard brush with 50% minimum size set to the pressure pen and get to the outline/detailing. These are the black outlines you'll actually see in and around my characters. After that, i color the characters in using my color swatches (saved in ps), mask out what i need invisible, dynamically border the panels (if needed, if not, i leave it as a cascade shot) set the speech bubbles and place the text. This whole process takes less than 3 hours if i work straight through. Im hoping to increase the quality of my work for the upcoming strips by taking a BIT more time in detailing, but my patience usually runs out around 3 hours so that's usually what you'll get. Most of the work mentioned takes place in photoshop.

`Dave

last edited on July 14, 2011 10:45AM
Frostflowers at 12:29PM, Dec. 28, 2006
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First, I write my script - parantheses for the actions/layout descriptions, quotations for the dialogue.

Then, I sit down and rough out all the pages - shuffling things around, splitting one line of dialogue into two, or shoving two short ones together depending on the number of panels. No rulers, no set measurements of panels - just a sort of approximate line where one panel ends and the next one begins. This is where I play a little with perspective, angles, general layout (to escape the “standard of four panels a page”, all with the same angle - talking heads) so that it doesn't look boring.

Then, I sit down and draw out the pencils for all the pages. Which means I pull out my ruler and my mechanical pencil and get to work; measuring the approximate panel-size, adding or subtracting hald-centimetres to make sure it all fits. I do cleaner-lines versions of the pictures (which means people get - shock and amazement - eyesand facial expressions) and try to leave as little mess as possible. Messy lines make for difficult inking.

Then, I scan my pages - I would ink them traditionally, like some wonderfully talented people do, but I'm too chickenshit. I'm scared I'll ruin my lines, so in the scanner they go. Once scanned, I pull them into Painter IX and go over the lines with the Cover Pencil brush - I have a tablet, which means I have the luxury of pen-pressure digital inking. It comes out looking sort of alright in the end, so I'm happy. Then, I go over it all on another layer with greyscale.

Then, I consider myself done and reward myself. By reading the heaviest book I can find, for the joy of it.

….

Yes. I'm a hopeless case. Don't judge me.
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
Terminal at 2:03PM, Dec. 28, 2006
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Like that.

last edited on July 14, 2011 4:10PM
NecroMouse at 2:28PM, Dec. 28, 2006
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Wow, I'm going to sound like a total newb. (note: I don't have access to much of anything so..) I sit down, a random idea pops into my head, then I draw it, take a picture of it, then upload it to my computer then on here. If it looks terrible or is hard to read (before I take the picture) I just re-draw it. .-. But my characters are stickmen..so that's a huge reason why it doesn't take so long. (I don't plan to stick with them, when I'm more confident and set on my actual art skills then bye-bye stickmen!) ._.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:09PM
jakey926 at 8:26PM, Jan. 27, 2007
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well in my comic i use an imulater hooked up to my PS2 while playing one of the old MK games so i can get my sprites. i then go to paint and create my back grounds. i then take the data form the emulater and save it to my comp incase i need it for future uses. i then take the sprites and put them where they need to be, use pencil, line and paintbrsh options to fill i nthe empty spaces on the sprites. i add wording and POW!!!! that's how you get the life and times of beech grove!
the only thing dumber than this signature is the one who's reading it…
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:06PM
Broken Minds at 4:28AM, Jan. 28, 2007
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Spend 2 years brainstorming, refining, and honing an idea.

1 year creating charecters, events, and scenarios.

6 months refining charecters, finally settling on a look.

10 minutes to plan out the overall events of a book.

5 minutes briefly writing in paragraph from a script.

Draw the page in Manga Studio Debut.

Export to Photoshop and add text. Resize.

Wala.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:35AM
hat at 10:32AM, Jan. 28, 2007
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Here's how I make a page.

Take out a piece of paper, draw it with a number 2 pencil. Sometimes I ink with 1 black marker, but most of the time I skip that step and scan it in to my computer. Then I ink with Flash.

last edited on July 14, 2011 12:45PM
silentkitty at 8:07PM, Jan. 28, 2007
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As for writing, the script is written about three chapters in advance so that I have some idea as to what's coming. :p I know how I want it to -end-, and I have a lot of scenes in the middle in mind, but there's some fuzzy grey areas left open-ended on purpose in case I want to change my mind a little (or things aren't going over well with readers). Tiny, tiny thumbnails (no bigger than an inch long) accompany my written pages because I'm a visual thinker and it's much easier for me to just sketch out a thumbnail than try to write down how I want the page to work. Since no one sees the script but me, it works out.

The art for Purgatory is done completely digitally. In fact, the whole reason that I started this comic was because I wanted to learn how to draw straight on the computer, which is something that I am just not very good or fast at, compared to pencil art.

Anyway, I open up an 11x17, 600dpi file in Photoshop (I'm still holding out on the hope of printing someday) and mark off my trim/text lines like it were an actual comic art board. It's just easier to keep track of where I'm drawing stuff with guides down. Um.. then basically I just sketch out pretty roughly where everything's gonna go, and then go directly to inks. I really don't like obsessing over details in the “pencil” stage, since I usually end up going back and fixing stuff while I'm inking anyway.

Coloring is the part that takes me forever. :p Sketch layer is erased, inks are slapped onto one layer and then the color follows in roughly 20-30 layers underneath that, created and smooshed together into groups as I finish areas (to keep the file size down a little).

After color is done, the file gets opened in Illustrator and lettered there. I can't stand lettering in Photoshop - it's so much easier to drag and move things around in Illustrator, and there's so many more options to mess with text for sound effects and whatnot.

Uh.. then it gets shrank'in down and posted on teh interweb. =]
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:37PM
Red Slayer at 9:23PM, Jan. 28, 2007
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I kill goats and eat children in the name of Marduk.
then i stare into the void until something hits me.
Then i draw stuff on a piece of paper and post it.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:02PM
marshie at 5:07PM, Jan. 29, 2007
(offline)
posts: 10
joined: 2-1-2006
First I get an idea and do a really rough sketch on paper and with any pen or pencil available. Then on regular printer paper I draw a final and ink it. Then I scan it. Put it into flash, then trace the bitmap. I fix up whatever I need then color it. Then I go into Photoshop and add the word balloons. It's done! I then think of a title. (As if it takes that much work.) I post it up for all the people to see!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:54PM

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