Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

I want white.
hat at 11:31PM, July 10, 2007
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So let's say I've inked a page by hand, and I scanned it in to the PC. Well, we all know paper isn't 100% white, but that's what I want my page background to be. Is there any process/trick to getting the background white, as in, not making it look like it's drawn on a piece of paper. I tried upping the contrast/brightness, but it messed up my lines.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:45PM
D0m at 3:39AM, July 11, 2007
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That's very tough. I'd say to make a new layer, and if you have a tablet, re-ink on that layer.

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last edited on July 14, 2011 12:02PM
JustNoPoint at 5:15AM, July 11, 2007
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Back when I scanned stuff in I would try to simply replace all the lines with black color then replace the offwhite and what is left with white.

If you are using paint shop use the color replace method with maybe a 60 or so tolerance set and color replace the offwhite with white.

If you have photoshop you want to un check contiguous and use the fill tool with a high tolerance.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:12PM
Nicotine at 6:18AM, July 11, 2007
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You have Photoshop? If you do, you should use the magic eraser to take off all that off-white, because that's basically what it's for. See the eraser too on the left side of the tool bar? Hold it and you should see an eraser white a sparkle by it. That's the magic eraser. All you have to do is set the intensity you want to and click on the places you want to make white.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:16PM
Meechi at 6:46PM, July 11, 2007
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You can mess with the curves a bit to get the effect you want. It can make you blacks really dark and brighten your whites. When I do it, there are two points on my curve and it makes an “S” shape. Hope that helps.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:58PM
junkyb at 9:33PM, July 11, 2007
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Meechi
You can mess with the curves a bit to get the effect you want. It can make you blacks really dark and brighten your whites. When I do it, there are two points on my curve and it makes an “S” shape. Hope that helps.

Ya, that's the easiest way I can think of. In photoshop, Image>adjust>curves, and select the 3rd dropper, click the “white” area, or the area you want to become white, and adjust the line to form an “s” curve. Sometimes when I draw on textured paper, it scans in as grey, and if my inking is strong enough, this usually does the trick. :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:11PM
swisscheese at 10:31PM, July 12, 2007
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I ink my stuff before I scan it in, then I scan it as a 2 color (BLACK and WHITE) image at a significantly higher resolution than I need. Then I convert it to RGB color and work my magic on it. The higher resolution is what keeps it from looking aliased (pixellated) when I shrink it down to the final size.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 4:05PM
cetriya at 10:38PM, July 12, 2007
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if you have your pick inked and have no pencials, then all you have to do is scan your pic as BW/lineart and make sure its a realy large dpi

if you have already scanned on your pic, and you're using photoshop, then all you have to do is go to IMAGES > TRESHOLD and go from there
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:39AM
patrickdevine at 8:31PM, July 16, 2007
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When I want an image like that I'll usually draw with dark, fat, bold lines and a lot of heavy shading, then I'll just scan it as black and white instead of greyscale. True, you tend to lose some of the subleties that way so it really only works with simple images.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:41PM
SteveMyers22 at 11:00PM, July 16, 2007
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hat
So let's say I've inked a page by hand, and I scanned it in to the PC. Well, we all know paper isn't 100% white, but that's what I want my page background to be. Is there any process/trick to getting the background white, as in, not making it look like it's drawn on a piece of paper. I tried upping the contrast/brightness, but it messed up my lines.

As mentioned above, you can just scan it in B/W instead of grey. That will give you white.

In photoshop you can also tweak the curves, or use selective color to control those kinds of things. It's especially easy in grayscale.

What I do is a little sillier and way too many steps, but 8 years of doing it has made it habit. I select my blacks. All of them. I convert that to a path. I save the path. I fill the path in with 100% k on a separate layer. I drop the scan down and forget about it. I color in layer after layer underneath my new lines. Back in photoshop 5 I found this tactic helped me get smoother lines. Like really smooth lines. Some info was invariably lost, but I had stopped cross hatching as much by then because it was so damn mind numbing to color with a lot of hatching anyways. But I digress. Doing things this way, I had a transparent background. And could definitely get pure white where I needed it.


last edited on July 14, 2011 3:58PM
Kohdok at 10:55AM, July 20, 2007
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I simply make a layer above my original one and draw it in black. The black is surrounded by transparency. I then create a layer in between those two layers, make the other layers not visible (By clicking the eye) Then just use fill tool. I do the same for background flat colors, only I don't remove the panel lines.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:20PM
cs3ink at 11:24AM, July 20, 2007
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Photoshop. Photoshop. Photoshop.

You can use so many tools in the program to achieve your desired results. Curves, Levels, etc.

If you're using no washes in your inking, as in just B&W linework, you can scan the image as a B&W, bitmapped image & you'll also achieve the desired results.

Later,
Chip
Creator of Terran Sandz and Broken Things, and now Dead. Check 'em out.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:55AM
Blackmoon at 11:48AM, July 22, 2007
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I use the “inefficient” method, myself. Learned it in a magazine.

Create two shapes- it doesn't matter what they are, as long as one is black and one is white- on another layer.
Now, click on your lineart layer and bring up the levels menu (ctrl-l); fiddle around with the sliders until the white of the page matches the white shape you made, and the black of the page matches the black shape.
Careful not to overdo it, though, I've destroyed some good detail that way.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
Aurora Moon at 11:47AM, July 23, 2007
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LOL!@all those complex suggestions.

If you have photoshop, then you should do what I do….

Ctrl+M, it brings up the curves feature where you can use the eyedropper tool that has white stuff filled up inside it. then click on the “problem” areas where it's grey and stuff. then it should clear up BIG time!
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:10AM
marine at 11:53PM, July 27, 2007
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adjustments in photoshop should fix that. play with the color and contrast for desired effects.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:52PM

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