Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Inking techniques for Shoujo/Shonon genre manga
Knuckles at 8:06AM, Nov. 18, 2007
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Any helpful sites/tutorials out there that talk about how to ink in Shoujo and Shounen style using Sakura Micron or Deleter pens? (not the ones with nibs)

Myth Xaran (manga) - http://www.drunkduck.com/Myth_Xaran
Exodus Studios (Games & More) - http://www.exodus-studio.com
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:19PM
Knuckles at 6:05AM, Nov. 20, 2007
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…No one uses Microns or Deleter pens anymore? :/

Myth Xaran (manga) - http://www.drunkduck.com/Myth_Xaran
Exodus Studios (Games & More) - http://www.exodus-studio.com
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:19PM
Darth Mongoose at 6:18AM, Nov. 20, 2007
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Are you talking about just technical pens in general? ‘Cause I use them, but not micron or deleter brand specifically. If you want a really authentic look for black and white, screentoned manga, I’d recommend using nib pens and a pot of deleter ink.
When I use technical pens for webcomic pages and the like, I use three different widths: 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8. If you just use one pen for the whole thing, the lines may come out looking flat and lifeless due to a lack of line weight diversity. Use the finest pen for fine detail, then go over outside outlines with a chunkier pen for that bold, shounen look.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Knuckles at 8:42AM, Nov. 20, 2007
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So would the really thin-width pens be good to use for shoujo-style comics? Can you vary line widths using just one thin pen? I've noticed that Shoujo-style doesn't have much variations in lines (or it's very few and far between). I've tried using the nib-pens you have to dip in ink, but I have a very shaky hand and my lines don't come out smooth.

Myth Xaran (manga) - http://www.drunkduck.com/Myth_Xaran
Exodus Studios (Games & More) - http://www.exodus-studio.com
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:19PM
Darth Mongoose at 11:06AM, Nov. 20, 2007
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Nib pens are harder to use. There's a technique to using them because there's less friction. It's like the difference between rollerblades and ice skates. With nib pens, you have to be confident and absolutely certain of where the line will go before you start to draw it. They do give the advantage of crisp lines, which get wider when you press harder, and good ink with nibs will be more fade resistant over time (this isn't an issue with webcomics though!)
Finer lines do tend to work well with shoujo, but it doesn't have to be the case. As a general rule, I would say that the bolder and simpler your style is, the better it'll look with thick lines. If your style is delicate, it'll look good with fine lines.
As for changing the width with one pen, yes, it can be done. Go over lines you want to be thicker more than once and you can get a decent result.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
mlai at 1:51PM, Nov. 20, 2007
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If using technical pens, definitely buy a variety of sizes. I currently have 0.05, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and felt tip.

Having a range of sizes at your disposal… you feel the difference right away. I was so happy with my pg.3 of Fight_2… that was my first time ever using my range of pens.

FIGHT current chapter: Filling In The Gaps
FIGHT_2 current chapter: Light Years of Gold
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:06PM
sukaiyume at 12:47PM, Nov. 26, 2007
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I find a range of pens also very handy. I have a 0.05 (although the fibres snap pretty easily), a 0.1, 0.2 and a 0.8. You can switch between them depending on what it is you're drawing e.g If you are one of those people who inks black hair (I used to but it took forever) you don't want to use a 0.05.

However I would imagine if you used a pen with a proper nib then you may be able to vary the thicknesses by adjusting your hand position. I suppose that if you used quite a thick nib you could draw the thin lines by holding the pen uh… how do I put this… sidewards and the thick ones with the pen… frontwards (that sounded really dumb.) Although I wouldn't really know because I've never used this type of pen for drawing before.

It doen't matter how you ink really, there are lots of varying styles. Take Fruits Basket for example. Takaya Natsuki's lineart is very thin and sleek as opposed to art by CLAMP which vary their thcknesses- so then the parts in shadow are heavily inked like the sides of the faces.)

last edited on July 14, 2011 4:04PM
RentAThug at 1:55PM, Nov. 26, 2007
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While a variety of pens is very useful, you can also use a single pen and still be able to vary your line width. You should probably start with a pen with a line that's as thin as you plan on using, though, since there's no way to make your line thinner, just thicker. Basically all you have to do is ink the page normally, then pick out what you want to be thicker and ink along the line, but slightly offset so that the new line thickens the original.

Just using a bunch of different pens is a lot easier, though.


Crime Pays, updating Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:05PM
shungnai at 7:20PM, Nov. 27, 2007
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When I was young. I used Sakura's micron 01,03 and 05. The characters were lined (twice times)with 01, the balloon is just once time with 03 and the border with 05.
I lined the characters twice time to vary the line, which my own simple rule is make it thicker where you think there's suppose to be shades (under chin, inside ear etc.)
Usually, I notice that the most thin lines in of shoujo comic are hair & backgrounds.
In these days, I can control my hands better so I'm happy with the fountain pen (Tachikawa or Nikko's brand) but it also needs the good quality inks to work well.

PS. My online comic was drawn digitally, so I'm not going to talk about it.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:35PM

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