Debate and Discussion

Is there anything worthwhile to a human existence in making comics?
Comicracy at 12:18AM, June 14, 2010
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Can you argue that is a justifiable existence as a human being to create comic books when many in the world see it as sort of a man-childish sort of thing. I mean there are people who do much more seemingly important things with their lives, like paramedics, police, farmers, doctors, ect. so how can you justify being a comic book artist ( if you are one )? I'm just wondering in the end if it really matters or are we just doodling pointless pictures? One point to ponder, I have heard studies that ‘creating a fictional character or concept that creates or portrays a positive social stance/role model’ is a more effective way to influence people than say being a counselor, probation officer, politician, ect. Perhaps it's the power of propaganda… what do you think?
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:44AM
Genejoke at 1:22AM, June 14, 2010
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About as much point as there is to Paris Hilton I suppose…

Well actually we provide entertainment and maybe a little more, I know some writers and artists want to enlighten people.

Also for me it's a little therapeutic, it is a hobby as well, I am a stay at home father at the moment, Doing a webcomic doesn't define me it is something i do, but I am creative at heart, and i do feel the need to create something. Essentially what we do is as justifiable as anything charles dickens did.

Now before you say hell no consider this, why did dickens write? was it because he knew he would become a world renowned author or because he wanted to write and perhaps reach out to people in some way?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:33PM
DAJB at 3:42AM, June 14, 2010
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Genejoke
About as much point as there is to Paris Hilton I suppose…
Oh God, I do hope there's more point to making comics than that! ;-)

Comicracy
Can you argue that is a justifiable existence as a human being to create comic books
Absolutely, yes. You're right of course, paramedics and others do a lot more practical good with their lives, but making comics is no less “justifiable” than many other occupations, especially in the fields of art or entertainment, whether it be acting, painting, being a chat show host or playing a professional sport.

Sadly, not all of us are cut out to be saints. For most of us, therefore, it's enough to help others in small ways whenever we can. If we also happen to enjoy making comics, then why does that even need “justifying”? It hurts no one and may even give a little enjoyment to others!

last edited on July 14, 2011 12:04PM
ozoneocean at 6:52AM, June 14, 2010
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DAJB
Comicracy
Can you argue that is a justifiable existence as a human being to create comic books
Absolutely, yes. You're right of course, paramedics and others do a lot more practical good with their lives,
Not really… in the long-view, the comic artist creates more of a contribution to human civilisation and culture- people die anyway, no matter what a medic can do, they can't stop death. More people live and die and live and die… and meanwhile culture goes on, grows and flourishes.
(not disagreeing with you BTW man, just using that completely out of context snippet as a jumping off point to make my own stupid post)

In the long, long, long-view of course none of it makes any difference, nothing does. But since our lives only encompass around 10 decades (more or usually less), the long, long, long-view is of hypothetical interest only :)

Regardless, your doctors, farmers, lawyers etc all have a valuable contribution to make to the on-going maintenance of society, but man can't live on bread alone. So they say.
Our ever growing, evolving, rich culture* is what really separates us from other creatures on earth, without that we really would be nothing more than beasts- like termites, or bees even. Not a bad life perhaps, but not an interesting one either.
Doing something like comic art (whatever the kind), painting, writing, playing music etc, you are a part of the reason we are as we are, a living manifestation of “Art”.

So just keep doing what you're doing.

*Culture- everything from language, architecture, all the sciences, all the arts, writing, all technology…
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:36PM
BffSatan at 9:41AM, June 14, 2010
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What is contributing? What is worthwhile? Is there really anything that is a worthwhile contribution to the human race? Do we all play a role in a greater existence or should our own pleasure come first before all others? I think you're missing the big issues here.

The way I see it is that either we're all contributing to humanity or we're all just wasting our time.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:21AM
Chernobog at 9:48AM, June 14, 2010
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In an existential sense, none of the occupations listed are really all that relevant. One could also join one of those occupations and be either terrible or corrupt at it.

People have aptitudes or an innate leaning towards a certain task. Unless someone's a communist, you're less likely to directly work for the greater good of a specific society than indirectly benefit it through what a person naturally shines through. I could potentially become something more socially useful like a doctor, but I would definitely hate it. As a result, my patients and other people around me might suffer for it. Point being, it's unnecessary and probably quite unhealthy to look upon the importance of a human life via what they offer others by their tasks and professions.

Unless you're a mime. Then you have my pity. :D

Let me put something else out here. The work of police officers, firemen, lawyers, etc may save lives, but in time, these deeds are forgotten in the future's waking eye. A mind, however, can be opened/enriched/changed through written and illustrated work. Things that stoke thought and imagination cannot be easily measured compared to more practical and immediate deeds. Creative works will long outlive their creator, some of their messages and expressions utterly timeless. In terms of such things being more influencing than not, I will agree there.

As for what many people in the world think, I have to laugh to myself. These are the same people who shell out hard earned money for needless trinkets and fads, living check to check, full of dreams but empty of deed. The mass majority is not necessarily a body of functional thought whatsoever.

 
 
“You tell yourself to just
enjoy the process,” he added. “That whether you succeed or fail, win or
lose, it will be fine. You pretend to be Zen. You adopt detachment, and
ironic humor, while secretly praying for a miracle.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:41AM
kyupol at 6:09PM, June 14, 2010
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For 90% of us, creating comics makes less money than a burger flipper.

You just have to LOVE doing it. For me, its almost like a divine calling or something. :)
NOW UPDATING!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:27PM
MicMit at 12:22PM, June 18, 2010
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I love that this is one of the first topics I see coming to this forum. I actually went through a small crisis about this not too long ago. I was thinking about what I was doing with my life, and why.

I've lived an extremely privileged life, and in recent years I have learned that I can't take it for granted. I think it's terrible that I've been given so many opportunities that most will never even get to see. What I really wanted was to give people a shot at what I've had. While I was coming to this revelation, I also realized I'm at art school.

Art has a terrible reputation for being for the privileged and high class, incredibly often the material swings way over the head of most people, making them just feel stupid for not getting it. Worse than that, it functionally does nothing. At the end of the day it's there to look pretty and distract people from the terrible things happening outside of it.
So here I am with starting my very expensive education that lasts 4 years that essentially leads into a life of making pretty things. I quite nearly dropped out that first semester, because I was thinking to myself surely I can do something more involved in people's life than providing distractions. I am strongly against forms of escapism, because I think if people dislike the way they live they should do something about it, not drown themselves in delusions that aren't going to happen.
I didn't drop out because I couldn't help but feel there had to be something to art, and specifically comics. I mean these are things I've spent my life being compelled and inspired by, surely there's something to it beyond a simple distraction.
After a long time, I finally came up with my answer. I realized that it's incredibly hard to live in reality all the time, it's overwhelming. That's why we seek escapism, it gives us our breathing room. But our escapism doesn't have to be a complete detachment from reality.
This is what art became to me, we give ourselves to the artwork's illusion only for it to show us something about the real. Great art, and this can be absolutely anything, doesn't distract us but in fact makes us more aware of ourselves and our environment physically, politically, and spiritually. It forces the viewer to think on a critical level.
We are people given to impulse and irrationality, but we also can easily overcome this simply by considering our actions. Getting people to think is how we progress.
That was my justification for art, in general, I would not create things simply to be pretty they had to be presented to make people think.
As I said before art has a tendency to be for the privileged, it is often singular pieces that can be hard to get access to, when you do they are not always understood. That's the glory of comics, though, they are mass produced (or put up on the internet) they are a cheap and easy to access. The combination of images and words provide a fairly easy level of communication of ideas. Comics are an artform through which I can speak to millions of people and at their leisure. I'm may not be directly affecting all these people who read it, but I certainly affecting more people than I would in most professions, and hopefully my work will do somebody some good.
I don't want to dismiss doctors, teachers, and others as being inadequate jobs, because being directly involved in people's lives is incredibly imporant. These are jobs that help people stay alive and live comfortably. Without those first, art has no place, but Art should make people appreciate that. The great accessibility of comics can make sure life's not just enjoyed by the wealthy. Also art should make us critical, make us see the flaws in our life, and make us want to know how to make it better.

So yeah I just did that stream-of-consciousness so I'm sure it's vague in a lot of parts, but that's essentially my thoughts on the matter
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:01PM
Abt_Nihil at 5:41AM, July 6, 2010
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MicMit
I've lived an extremely privileged life … Art has a terrible reputation for being for the privileged and high class… As I said before art has a tendency to be for the privileged
I don't know about you, but the standard of living of all artists I know personally is much lower than in many other (“regular” ) occupations (see also Kyopol's post). Historically, art may have been for the privileged at some point, and the yellow press may give the impression that artists are living a privileged life, but the reality is that art doesn't pay as much or as regularly as many other jobs. The conclusion may be that you already have to be privileged in order to be able to make art, because your income would already have to be assured through other venues. But, again, I don't know a single person where this is the case. The privileged few do like to surround themselves with (ridiculously expensive) art, but that's far from saying that artists are privileged.

What about your conjoined thesis, that art is for the privileged? From an artist point of view, I wouldn't worry too much about who art is supposed to be for. But even if you do, I must strongly disagree: Most art is made by the non-privileged for the non-privileged. That is because the art that's enjoyed by the upper classes represents but a fraction of all art that is produced.

Generally, it really bothers me that artists need to justify what they do, moreso than others. The attitude that art is useless is widely spread, but it's really just ignorance. Art is all around you, everyone profits from it in everyday life. It is true that art isn't the most basic need of a human being. But values are not just informed by our physical needs. The things that make life worth living, the things that make you and others happy, are more often than not things which are not, strictly speaking, “necessary”. Food and medical aid are things which satisfy needs, but that means that rather than making you happy, they satisfy you. And I don't think that life is about satisfaction. Basic needs have to be satisfied on a very basic level, but this level is really just the basis for whatever life you build on it.

The question “what has value?” is just as important as the question “what is useful?”. And there are few things which have more inherent value than art. Art is not just about creating “pretty things” (as you have said yourself already, it is at least as much about seeing reality for what it is as about distracting from it), and even if it were - beauty is an important factor in making life worth living, especially if it's a sort of artistic beauty. Creating and enjoying beauty doesn't mean that you try to distract someone from the ugliness of the world. It means you reduce ugliness (at least, relatively speaking: in the total sum of beauty vs ugliness - but chances are that ugliness is reduced even more directly because the beauty you create alleviates the sort of sentimental pessimism you seem to be expressing). That is something to be clearly distinguished from mere escapism. To me, escapism means: You should act on something that's bad, but you'd rather do something pleasurable. In most cases, that is not what art does, even if art may potentially fulfill this function. I don't read comics instead of helping someone (I probably do it instead of slacking off). I certainly wouldn't become a medic if I weren't making comics.

True: If we were all medics, we might live longer (probably not, because we'd also need people growing crops, building houses, and generally fulfilling all the other “necessary” functions). But what kind of life would that be? You don't just have to make sure that life is sustained, but that it has content and purpose. For me, that is what art provides.

Comicracy
I have heard studies that ‘creating a fictional character or concept that creates or portrays a positive social stance/role model’ is a more effective way to influence people than say being a counselor, probation officer, politician, ect.
Indeed, the possibility to influence people is often used as a justification for creating fiction. It's certainly possible that fiction can be useful in this sense, but I refuse to accept that the only way for art to have any value is by influencing people (in a “moral” way). It is perfectly acceptable to do something you're enjoying and which others might potentially enjoy as well. It's extremely great to know that others are enjoying my comics, but that's not the reason why I make them, nor do I have to justify my making them this way.

In general, demanding justification is nothing but exerting social pressure. Don't give in to those who exert this pressure on you. They may be your parents or friends or spouses, but in most cases, you owe them no justification. In the spirit of what Chernobog wrote: Every person on this planet does so many things each day which would qualify as stupid or pointless, but for some reason, we need to justify making comics (which from my POV is one of the best ways to spend your time after fulfilling your basic needs)!

As for some of the other posts before mine: General nihilism or cultural relativism isn't likely to help anyone asking themselves whether making comics is worthwhile :P
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:44AM
maycroft at 9:20PM, July 6, 2010
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I think it's worthwhile to make comics. from those that show the impunitiy of the world, those that give us heroes to keep the hopes up and even those that keep our minds off from our problems and give us a good time laughing.
yes, maybe the comic-reader public are nerds, or geeks mostly. but somehow, someway they inspire people in some way.
I think if it wasn't that way we wouldn't be here arguing about this, and uploading pages about all kinds of stories.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
bravo1102 at 3:42AM, July 7, 2010
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Humans have a need to express themselves with images. There was probably some guy who supplied the voices for those cave drawings. Expression develops and evolves over time and expressing that creative instinct for visual and written (ever since they invented writing and even then it took millenia to replace oral story tellers) expression and it always has been worthwhile to our species and always will.

It is a part of us whether scribbling on cave walls or drawing gags, adventures, opinion or pornography.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
MicMit at 9:57PM, July 8, 2010
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Abt_Nihil
a lot of good stuff

I agree with you on pretty much everything you said. I just wanted to say that when I said art is usually considered to be for the privileged, I by no means meant that artist lived privileged lives. Most art history shows us that that was most certainly not the case. What I meant is that if you ask an everyday person “What is art?” what you'll probably get is a reference to famous paintings and sculptures, most of which were commissioned by extremely wealthy individuals.
Often new works by these artists do not get publicly displayed for decades after they are commissioned, but instead remain in private collections. As a result “art” has been tied with the extravagant, and when the average person sees and doesn't understand the work they often simply feel that they are not cultured enough.

On the other hand, this a perception that has changed a bit in the last half-century, and is one I completely disagree with. The idea of what is art has expanded (for example Graphic Design and Illustration are welcomed forms now), but mainly within perception of those involved in the art world. Art education with in the general public is severely slack in age where art has progressed so much. This has caused many artists to pursue lofty conceptual ideas, but lose track of how to connect with their average viewer.

This is one of the glories of comics, it is still a hatchling in the art world. Many people make regular habit of reading comics in a variety of forms, and do not feel alienated but in fact comforted in it. It's mass production and cheap prices help maintain it's status as a “common person's art form,” and allows the artists to reach audiences far larger than sculptures and paintings.
At the same time the potential of the medium has started to reveal itself, and a lot of people are beginning to understand that comics are not simply amusing stories, but also deep philosophical discussions.

As for justifying it in comparison with other careers, the question at hand I believe is the necessity of art/comics, and if you think about it that way there is no real need for art. If we woke up to tomorrow and Art (as an abstract concept) was removed from us, then we could perfectly maintain life. I do believe, though, that art is the essential part of human. Nothing else that we have discovered holds anything remotely similar to the idea of art within itself. Every work of art contains within itself an element of human vanity (seriously, show me any work, and I'll show you an obsession with humanity). In fact I believe that art is the celebration of being human.

Also, make no mistake that art is a form of escapism. What removes it from other forms of escapism is a looping effect. If indulged in a form of escapism, and that form brings you back facing the very reality you were escaping from, then that to me is art. That can be literally anything, and is completely dependent on the individual person as to what causes that.

This idea essentially liberates the artist from purpose in their work. They are free to create anything they want because they ultimately have no control over the thoughts and readings of their viewers. Plus no matter what they create somebody will read something into it.

But I don't agree that the artist should give up meaning completely. Think about an artwork as a complex labyrinth put into place by the artist. The labyrinth is truly a marvel of design, and the artist isn't even really sure how it all came about. Several viewers will enter the maze not knowing its end, and each will take his or her own path and find and explore separate corridors. Many will come to what they assume is the end (or the meaning), few will be in the same place. That being said there will be those who have arrived at your choice conclusion, who made the loop all the way round and are backing facing reality now with the new experiences you have presented them in the work.

The artist needs to create a work with an intention of where they want it to end. We, as artists, have experiences and opinions that nobody else has (as well as everyone having experiences that the artist does not have). In these experiences and opinions are new potential ideas to give to people, to broaden their minds, and to propose progress. If we do not share our experiences we do not progress as humans, and if we are not progressing what is there to celebrate about being human, and thus why should we create art. It is completely worth it to share this information if only for the few people who completely understand it, because you have given these people something of yourself to carry on. For those who don't see the intended end though, the worst you have given them are new experiences that not even you have had.

(The whole labyrinth thing is really just a short summary of John Barth's work “Lost in the Funhouse” which is a really awesome short story everyone should check out)
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:01PM
ifelldownthestairs at 1:34PM, July 15, 2010
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ozoneocean
Not really…

every ozone post ever
you know why birds don't write their memoirs? because birds don't lead epic lives, that's why. who'd want to read what a bird does? nobody. that's who.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:57PM
El Cid at 6:18PM, July 15, 2010
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ifelldownthestairs
ozoneocean
Not really…

every ozone post ever
Ha! You noticed that too! Gawd, that's annoying!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:20PM
mlai at 7:57PM, July 19, 2010
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If indulged in a form of escapism, and that form brings you back facing the very reality you were escaping from, then that to me is art.
Well said. That is what every fiction is about, as all stories are about the human condition.

FIGHT current chapter: Filling In The Gaps
FIGHT_2 current chapter: Light Years of Gold
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:06PM
Plague Doctor at 10:31AM, July 22, 2010
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Woah…so many wise responses
For me,I just like to make stuff up and put it on the paper =P
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:46PM
Abt_Nihil at 4:10PM, July 22, 2010
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Plague Doctor
Woah…so many wise responses
For me,I just like to make stuff up and put it on the paper =P
That might just be the wisest response of all!
No, really. I mean, I had to write down this long-winded argument, just to arrive at the conclusion that you shouldn't even have to make such an argument in the first place! So, if I really were bothered by having to defend my position, I wouldn't bother defending it! :P Alas, I just like long-winded arguments.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:44AM
F Y R E 13 R A N D at 7:39AM, July 28, 2010
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Comicracy
Can you argue that is a justifiable existence as a human being to create comic books when many in the world see it as sort of a man-childish sort of thing. I mean there are people who do much more seemingly important things with their lives, like paramedics, police, farmers, doctors, ect.

Seriously? Why would a comic artist need to justify their existence more than anyone else? We can't all be doctors, police, and farmers.

Overpaid professional athletes, people who make computer viruses and pop-up ads, tabloid writers, the entire Air Miles organization, televangelists… these, and many other more useless parasites, are the people who need to justify their existence.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
lba at 2:18PM, July 28, 2010
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As for justifying your work, I remember an example from a design prof I met at the architecture school my dad taught at. He was having a discussion with someone at a fund raiser, when the subject of pay and value came up. This person didn't see why we should be paying designers and artists as much as we do, because after all, a chair is a chair and so on and so forth. The prof explained that he could give him an example at dinner. So the prof excused himself and left to help get dinner ready. Later on at dinner, they were one chair short for the person who had implied that designers weren't worth what they're paid. This person got a stepping stool that placed him about 6 inches lower that everyone else, meaning this guy had his chest at table height instead of his stomach like everyone else. The guy complained and was essentially told, “ a chair's a chair, right?”

The point I'm trying to make I guess, is that this is something that really doesn't have an apparent value until you take it away. Illustration and design in general is as vital a part of society as any other field, we've just had it around for so long that we tend to forget it's there.

Additionally, comics in particular seem to have a smaller impact on the world, because they're part of a greater creative output that illustrators create. It's not as valuable as what medics or your garbage collection agency do, because it's not as big as what they do. You're comparing one little aspect of a field to the entirety of another. If you were comparing the act of him driving around on call to be as close as possible to an accident to comics I think it might be a slightly closer comparison. If you were to compare the combined output of the entire field of illustration against the field of EMT's it's an apt comparison and the impact is just felt in different ways.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:30PM
TheShah at 9:15AM, Sept. 18, 2010
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I've had this debate with myself years ago, when I was unsure of what career path to get into.
I was well on my way to becoming a lawyer, with the intention of establishing myself in Criminal Law in Canada, then at the age of 35+, move back home (Bangladesh) and do some pro-bono work in that environment where corruption and poverty is standard, and try to make people accountable and do some good (naive I know)
As I matured, I realized that for me to be a lawyer back home, there would be one of two ways my life would go:
1) Be a successful and rich off my ass lawyer supporting and taking advantage of the corrupt ways there and essentially be part of the problem.
2) ‘Take on’ the corrupt system and establishment, putting the lives of everyone I know in danger and eventually getting shot one day on the way to work.

After months, I nixed the whole thing due to realization that my reasons for being a lawyer in the first place was parentally motivated and not my passion.
I Became a filmmaker.

I still have aspirations for doing things ‘for a cause’, but I think by telling stories, (webcomic or film or comic) we have an oppurtunity to show the world for how it is, reveal unknown information, grow support for a cause, help people in that sense by getting their stories out there– in both an informational and entertaining way.
Which is why I have no qualms about doing what I do now, in the grander scheme of things.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:28PM
binaryfaye at 12:48AM, Sept. 24, 2010
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I swear, my mother asks me this same thing all the time. “Why can't you do something else? Teach elementary school? Become a lawyer like your father and I? Hell, draw greeting cards. Then you'd at least brighten someone's day.”

Yeah, thanks mom…

I like drawing. I have stories I want to tell. Plus this keeps my hands busy and keeps me from starting a cult or more destructive things.

Also I've never been one just to follow what society dictates. Society doesn't think it's a useful career. I don't think sitting in a cubicle is either. And that's probably what I'd end up doing with my life if I didn't do this. I can't think of anything sadder.

last edited on July 14, 2011 11:22AM
Jabali at 12:05PM, Sept. 24, 2010
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Genejoke
Well actually we provide entertainment and maybe a little more, I know some writers and artists want to enlighten people.

Also for me it's a little therapeutic, it is a hobby as well, I am a stay at home father at the moment, Doing a webcomic doesn't define me it is something i do, but I am creative at heart, and i do feel the need to create something.

In essence I have to agree with Genejoke and OzoneOcean; we do what we like and if someone else digs or likes what we do that's just like the cherry on the top of a sundae.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:05PM
Peipei at 3:35PM, Sept. 28, 2010
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I think it's something you just have to love doing. Most of us don't make much profit from our comics alone, but speaking for myself, making and reading comics is my all time passion. It doesn't matter to me if i'm profiting from it or not. I have a lot of fun drawing out my own comics, if you really think about, it's no different from any other hobby. Making comics is much more constructive and more rewarding than most other hobbies though, at least in my opinion :p.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:41PM
GeneralWinter at 1:19AM, Oct. 12, 2010
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'creating a fictional character or concept that creates or portrays a positive social stance/role model' is a more effective way to influence people than say being a counselor, probation officer, politician, ect.

Absolutely! People can relate better to the story of (even) a fictitious character, and can be subtley convinced to change and become better people, than they can through direct confrontation about their faults. Real change is gradual, unforced, unseen. Only this way is it durable. I've never had any doubts about the point of being an artist, much less a comic artist (though I'm doing it professionally). It's philosophical discourse by other means than words. How else would you explain the fact that so many people admit to having been influenced by a piece of art (be it drawn, written, sung)? Art is humanity's best way of communicating things that cannot be verbalized, but have to be felt to be understood. Comic drawing is just another way :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:34PM
GeneralWinter at 1:20AM, Oct. 12, 2010
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Overpaid professional athletes, people who make computer viruses and pop-up ads, tabloid writers, the entire Air Miles organization, televangelists… these, and many other more useless parasites, are the people who need to justify their existence.

Here! Here!!! :D
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:34PM
Evil_Hare at 12:10PM, Oct. 14, 2010
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I'd say worthwhile, and sometimes even important. Sure, I'm producing a comic about a psychotic jackrabbit who thinks he's a superhero, but maybe somewhere out there it will change somebody's life… ok, maybe not, but it's good for cheap laughs.

I'd say definitely yes, and maybe one day I'll put together a comic that will be good for humanity. Right now, though, I want to sell some toys!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:24PM
LOOKIS at 9:53PM, Dec. 26, 2010
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It isn't necessary to justify your existence as a human being.

If you start with the assumption that you do need to do so, then you can find activities that seem “unjustifiable”. But the assumption that you need to justify your existence is an assumption that you don't need to make. Why not? Because…

All you know is that 1)you exist, 2)to keep existing you have to find food and shelter, and 3)you are surrounded by others of your kind who have worked out various ways for doing just that. You can choose one of those established ways or you can invent a new way. As long as you maintain your existence in a way that doesn't deprive anyone else of anything, then you are doing just fine. No justification necessary.

But if your life causes pain or deprivation to others, then you should rethink it or you might have to face some bad consequences.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 1:39PM
SarahDot at 1:41PM, Dec. 28, 2010
(offline)
posts: 14
joined: 11-29-2010
I am a comedian as well as… well… something of a cartoonist. My art earns me nothing. I have put years of time, effort, and money into it.

For my day job, I work in the marketing department of a auto parts company. Which is more important?

I feel that comedy can be a huge force for social change. If I make it as a comedian, I will be one of the first of my kind. There is no one on TV like me. I'd be one of the first real, honest-to-goodness, not a sideshow transsexuals that most people have seen. Simply by making people laugh, I will make the lives of those that come after me just a little bit easier.

Like I say. I feel that I'm changing the world, one dead baby joke at a time.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:22PM
Beelzy at 11:39PM, Dec. 29, 2010
(offline)
posts: 28
joined: 12-21-2010
Comics/manga are just another medium to express yourself. It isn't any less useful or entertaining than any other media, and being a comic artist isn't any worse than being a fiction writer. And as it is with fiction writers, if you can reach out to your audiences, and entertain them, make them cry and have feelings for the characters in your stories, then you've succeeded. So what if you'll never save someone like a policeman, doctor or fireman would; you've reached out to someone and touched them. And that's all that really matters. Who knows; as a side bonus, you might motivate someone to become a policeman, doctor or fireman…

I think this all has to do with that saying that man can't live on bread and water alone.
Pauca sed matura.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:16AM
itsjustaar at 6:20PM, Dec. 30, 2010
(online)
posts: 409
joined: 12-2-2010
It comes down to what you want to do with your comics. There are some who are doing it just for fun, some who are looking for meeting others and gaining some knowledge, and maybe just a small few looking to go beyond comics and stepping further. Most of all though, the bulk would like to do it just for fun that goes into making them, the stories, drawing it, and putting it out. I see them as entertainment value, and an alternative to what is presently available. That, and building on tips to improve and enhance the experience.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 1:05PM

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