Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Japanese for dummies (and fanboys/girls)
Darth Mongoose at 7:19AM, Nov. 21, 2006
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Okay, this is not a thread to tell you that you should write your comic forwards rather than backwards, or to tell you that writing your sound effects in another language is a bit strange. Even if I told people these, they wouldn't listen. This is a thread on how to use Japanese words, or rather, how NOT to use them in order to prevent yourself looking like a total idiot fanboy or girl. I'm a fourth year university student of the language, and I've spent a year living and studying in Japan, so though I'm not fluent, I can do things like explain the history and purpose of the European Union in Japanese (and once I actually had to do that for a Japanese friend), which should give you an idea of my level.
If you also happen to know something about the language and would like to add tips, please do so, or if you have questions, feel free to ask! Please don't fill the thread up with ‘why I hate comics that use Japanese’. That's not the point of the thread, the point is to help people who DO want to use Japanese in their comics, for whatever reason, use it less stupidly.

So, here we go with the sins of looking up names using a dictionary…

i-Adjectives are not names.
So, you're looking for a Japanese name for your character, huh? Aha, and you bought yourself a Japanese-English dictionary! You want a name for a character who is kind, so you flick to ‘kind’ and get ‘Yasashii’…STOP!
How many people do you know whose names are adjectives? Well, I know of six; Sleepy, Grumpy, Bashful, Dopey, Happy and Sneezy. You don't know it, because Japanese isn't your language, but giving your character an adjective for a name sounds just as strange in another language as it does in English.
The following may sound cool to you, if you have very limited or no Japanese knowledge, untranslated:
“Oh, hello, my name is Yasashii! I am the sorceress of the land of Kurai, and this is my friend, Utsukushii!”
But when anybody who's studied as much as elementary Japanese reads it, all they will see is:
“Oh, hello, my name is ‘Kind’! I am the sorceress of the land of ‘Dark’, and this is my friend, ‘Beautiful!’”
…Yeah. It is just as bad as that sounds.
There are a FEW adjectives that can be names. ‘Aoi’ (blue) and ‘Midori’ (green) are both names, but they're generally rare. Generally though, unless you are sure that it's a name because you've looked it up, or asked a friend who knows, avoid things that end in ‘shii’, and be way of things that end in ‘i’, unless you know they're not adjectives, they make silly names.

verbs aren't (always) names.
Verbs are more likely to be names than adjectives. Some names such as ‘Hikaru’ (shine) or ‘Mamoru’ (protect) are well known. Be veeeery careful though, or you get:
“I am the great warrior, Korosu, from the land of Bakahatsusuru! I will defeat the legendary hero, Mawasu!”
Which does sound preeetty cool until you translate it to:
“I am the great warrior, ‘Kill’, from the land of ‘Explode’! I will defeat the legendary hero, ‘Turn Around’!”
…Oh dear. It sounds like a dramatic monologue and an army training video got mixed up…
Finding verbs that make good names that don't sound odd is hard. I prefer to leave this one to the Japanese. If you've seen a name in a manga, it's likely to be okay to use. I would caution using names from ‘Naruto’ though, people have some pretty wierd-assed names in that series!

Nouns are…
Nouns are different. Some of them make good names, others don't. Generally they're pretty straightward, and you can make an educated guess by the meaning and sound:
Ryu (dragon) =DECENT NAME
Neko (cat) =PRETTY SILLY NAME
Ame (rain) =COOL NAME
Tegami (letter)=SILLY NAME
Sora (sky) =VERY COOL (if overused) NAME
Kemushi (hairy catterpillar) =NO, JUST, NO.
Kami (god) =Errrrr. 0_o' would you call your kid ‘God’?
Himitsu (secret) =sounds cool until you realise conversations would go like:
“Namae wa?” (what's your name?)
“Himitsu desu.” (it's secret)
(other person looks at ‘Himitsu’ funnily and wanders off).

In many cases, getting a noun and sticking something like ‘ichi’, ‘suke’, ‘tarou’ (can be written ‘taro’) ‘ko’, or ‘maru’ will give you a crazy cool, believable manga-esque name, like something from Sailor Moon, Bleach or Naruto.
examples from manga:
'Shikamaru' (shika=deer, maru=boy's name ending)
'Hanako' (hana=flower, ko=usually a girl's name ending, literally means ‘child’, can be used for male names occasionally, but may be best avoided for that unless you know a lot about names).
'Yoruichi' (Yoru=night, ichi=one, slightly masculine, but used for a female character in Bleach. A VERY cool name)
Or make up your own:
'Kensuke' (ken=sword, suke=male name ending that's very often associated with old names, ninja and samurai)
'Reiko' (rei=soul/spirit (or with different kanji=cold) ko=female name ending).

A superb site for names is:
http://www.behindthename.com/
I use that site a lot, you can search names from different countries by meaning, including Japanese names.

If you found this useful, maybe next time I could do Japanese surnames and place names? Or give cultural info about Japan and how people live there or something? If you want advice on anything in particular, ask and I'll try to tell you what I know.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Knuckles at 8:08AM, Nov. 21, 2006
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I suppose this probably doesn't apply to me with the current story I am doing. I used Japanese verbs, adjectives, and whatever to make some of the names of my characters in my story. I've had these names for years and years, and I don't really intend to change them. Compiling these names was not just the result of finding a random name in th dictionary that I thought ‘sounded cool.’ Each character's overall personality and actions reflect why I chose their name.
And the ‘strangeness’ of the names is also added because of the type of characters they are (in my case, it would be Dragons, and Dragons generally have strange names)


Edit: also..

Darth Mongoose
Kami (god) =Errrrr. 0_o' would you call your kid ‘God’?


Kami has several meanings, actually. Most common meanings are ‘God’ and ‘paper.’ But it can also mean hair, emperor, protection/safeguard (used in combination with ‘mamori’, above/top, and a whole slew of others just to name a few.
A lot of these kinds of ‘strange names’ are actually used, but they have more of a cultural base/background to them, rather than just ‘being a weird name.’


Myth Xaran (manga) - http://www.drunkduck.com/Myth_Xaran
Exodus Studios (Games & More) - http://www.exodus-studio.com
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:19PM
Aeon at 1:18PM, Nov. 21, 2006
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This may be a silly question… but I'm going to ask anyway.

So, my name is Raven. No, really, it's the name I was born with. And I'm blonde. My parents are just wierd.

Since my name is a noun, and there is a direct and literal translation of my name into Japanese, could I actually introduce myself to someone in Japan as Karesu (oy… I just spelled that wrong… but I can't be bothered to look up the actual spelling right now.) or would that be kind of a wierd no-no. Would it become more of a name if I added an ending to it like ‘ko,’ or would that just be garbled nonsense?

This is really just curiosity. I have enough fun naming my characters after really obtuse english puns to start trying it in a different language. At one point I was entertaining the notion of getting the kanji for raven tattooed somewhere, since I think it would be moderately less silly than getting a questionable adjective tattooed on my body… I always wonder what those tattoos would really say to a Japanese speaker…
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:46AM
Knuckles at 1:57PM, Nov. 21, 2006
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Usually, if your name isn't originally Japanese, you would have a kana name. So you would be called “Re-ben” (pronounced RAY-BEN). I mean, if you really wanted to translate your name to Japanese, you can, but most non-native people get slapped with the Katakana name :P

Myth Xaran (manga) - http://www.drunkduck.com/Myth_Xaran
Exodus Studios (Games & More) - http://www.exodus-studio.com
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:19PM
Darth Mongoose at 3:48PM, Nov. 21, 2006
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'Kami' can have several meanings, depending on which kanji you use, yes, but none of them make suitable names. When I wrote ‘Kami’ (god), I figured it'd be implied that I meant ‘Kami’ with the kanji reading ‘god’. Since neither ‘Hair’, nor ‘Paper’ are particularly good names, and the reading ‘kami’ of the kanji ‘ue’ is only used in very specific contexts, generally names of places and the occasional surname, plus ‘Top/Up’ would be a pretty strange name to begin with, I stand by my statement that it's not a very good name.

I understand that in many cases, it's impossible to change a characters' name. I, for example, spelled a certain characters name in the comic incorrectly, and I'm stuck with it with that spelling now because it's become her name. I can't tell people what names to use, I can only share my knowledge of the language. I had noticed a huge number over the years of characters with ‘adjective names’, and thought maybe the reason was simply because people didn't know and that I could help. If you like having the characters' names that way, or have a good reason, then it's fine. I can't argue with a conscious decision, I can only aid those who don't know where to start when looking for good names.

Wordplay names do indeed exist in Japanese. The most obvious ones I can think of would be ‘Tsukino Usagi’ (Sailor Moon) who's name translates as ‘Rabbit Moonfield’, but when said aloud, could easily be heard as ‘tsuki no usagi’, meaning ‘Rabbit of the Moon’ (when the Japanese look at the moon, they see not a man, but a rabbit making rice cakes!) and ‘Haruno Sakura’ (Naruto) who's name would translate as ‘Cherry blossom Springfield’ but again, read aloud could be heard as ‘The Cherry Blossom of Spring’. Unfortunately for your name, I'm with Knuckles, they would more than likely call you ‘Reiben’. My name is Kate, in Japanese, ‘Keito’, which means ‘wool’…great -_-'
Translating an English pun into Japanese generally won't work. The languages are very different, the grammar is different, and things that are used for names are different. It would be a nightmare of translation that I wouldn't wish on anybody. Trying to translate Japanese wordplay names is horrible, I mean, if they translated the names in Naruto to English to make the puns work, we'd have ‘Instructor Scarecrow Field’, and the lovable ninja, ‘Spiral Fishpasteroll’.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Aeon at 3:59PM, Nov. 21, 2006
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No, I'm well acquainted with the problems in translating puns across cultures, much less across languages.

Hmmm. Although I am suddenly struck with the need to write an epic love story about the star-crossed Spiral Fishpasteroll.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:46AM
Darth Mongoose at 1:09AM, Nov. 22, 2006
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Spiral Fishpasteroll=Uzumaki Naruto. I'm afraid you can already read his epic love story by picking up a copy of the manga!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Rich at 8:14AM, Nov. 22, 2006
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IT's nice that someone is going out of their way to teach some Japanese stuff to everyone here. I took two years of the language, and I may be a bit rusty, but I already knew most all of this stuff. It's not really as hard a language as everyone makes it out to be.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:06PM
Darth Mongoose at 11:07AM, Nov. 22, 2006
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Hahahaha. Those sound like the words of somebody who hasn't yet endured keigo or memorising all 1945 Joyo kanji >_<' Nah, Japanese really isn't all that hard to learn, certainly anybody has the capability to learn at least the basics, but every time you master one aspect of the language, a new thing appears. You learn all the hiragana, then katakana appears, followed later by kanji. You learn all the polite grammar forms, then you have to learn their plain forms, then you get keigo (uber polite Japanese), practically a language in itself.

Hmm, okay, how about some stuff on surnames? Japan is still a lot less mixed than places like England or America, you don't have the cultural and language melting pot of names that you get in many western nations such as England or America. Most Japanese surnames are one-to-three kanji long. The simplest Japanese names take two kanji names of geographical features and stick them together. So….
kawa/gawa (river)
ta/da (rice field)
yama (mountain)
take (bamboo)
can be combined to make the common names like:
Kawada,Yamada,Yamagawa,Tagawa,Takeda,Takeyama,Takegawa
Now throw in a few extra and descriptive words…
kuchi/guchi (mouth/entry)
mura (village)
ue/kami (up/top)
naka (middle)
shita (bottom)
no (wild field/meadow)
And you suddenly can make a HUGE number of names!
kawaguchi,yamaguchi,taguchi,murakami,yamashita,ueno,yamanaka,tanaka,nakada,murada…etc.

Many names in manga (ahem*SAILORMOON*ahem) do the ‘no’ trick. This is as simple as noun+'no'(as listed as ‘field’) above. Names that use this in Sailor Moon would be….er…everybody…'Tsukino' (tsuki=moon) ‘Mizuno’ (mizu=water) ‘Hino’ (hi=fire). You can also do this with many of the words listed above. Take the noun you want to use which describes your character, ie. Our character lives in a forest! So we want her name to involve the word ‘mori’ (forest):
Morida,Morigawa,Morino,Morishita,Moriguchi etc. If you're not sure about a name, say it aloud. If it sounds awkward when you say it, it's probably not a viable name (that's how the Japanese tend to do things with their language, they go by sound).

Next post I'll give info on how to combine the two lessons and example names and stuff, I guess. Or maybe some basic phrases and what they mean, and when to use them.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Mimarin at 7:48AM, Nov. 23, 2006
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But it's fun to give characters names that are silly when translated, I'm totally finding someone to call kamushi.
Of course you will. All intelligent beings dream. Nobody knows why.

Also, tell random people they are awsome! it helps!
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:02PM
Rich at 9:12AM, Nov. 23, 2006
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Darth Mongoose
Hahahaha. Those sound like the words of somebody who hasn't yet endured keigo or memorising all 1945 Joyo kanji >_<'

I meant actually SPEAKING it. The writing is a bitch. Kanji and Katakana are the two most evil things on the face of this planet.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:06PM
Knuckles at 11:19AM, Nov. 30, 2006
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There are so many Kanji to learn. I'm hoping to take that writing profiency test one of these days. I agree that Japanese is not that hard of a language to learn, IMO.. I think it's much easier than Spanish. But then again, I tend to understand all the ‘confusing’ stuff, and get all confused of the stuff that's supposed to be easy to understand >.>

Myth Xaran (manga) - http://www.drunkduck.com/Myth_Xaran
Exodus Studios (Games & More) - http://www.exodus-studio.com
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:19PM
Eunice P at 3:45AM, Dec. 2, 2006
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I can read Chinese characters, so kanji isn't too hard to learn. The pronunciation might be slightly different. I learnt extremely little Japanese, now I have almost forgotten about Hiragana, Katakana writings.

I could learn a thing or two from this tutorial.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:23PM
Darth Mongoose at 1:37PM, Dec. 2, 2006
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Knowing the chinese kanji seems to be a big help for Japanese. Sure you have to learn the kunyomi (Japanese reading) for them all, and sometimes a vaguely different meaning, but you can guess the onyomi (secondary reading) of about 90% of all kanji. Yeah, I'm hugely jealous of people who speak chinese when I'm in kanji classes! I don't speak a word of chinese myself!

Okay, how about some commonly used and misused phrases!

Ways of saying ‘hello’:

konnichiwa! (good day!/hello!) -Maybe the most well known Japanese word. Basically it means hello, BUT be careful where you use it. ‘Konnichiwa’ is too generally formal to use with friends and family! It can also be a bit too informal for formal situations. It is best used for situations in which a character is speaking to somebody of roughly their own social status who is not a close friend or relative. ie. to your friends' parents, to a teacher, to the lady in your local shop etc.

ohayou!/ohayou gozaimasu! (morning!/good morning!)-Often people use either of these in the wrong context. In Japanese, longer tends to equal more polite. ‘Ohayou gozaimasu’ is polite and can be used with teachers, people you don't know, important people, or people you respect and your work mates…however, use this formal greeting to your friends and family and you'll come across as cold and aloof! So with your friends, family and people who are at the same school as you, use just ‘ohayou!’

konbanwa! (good evening) -This is the same politeness level as ‘konnichiwa’, but it's for use in the evening. Generally 6pm onwards.

doumo!/ yo! -These are casual ways of saying ‘hi!’ to friends. Yes, ‘yo!’ comes from english. Basically, the Japanese don't have a particularly good way of saying ‘hi’, and so will normally just wave, say the person's name or use an english greeting such as ‘hello!’

Shitsureishimasu!/O Jamashimasu! -(Sorry to intrude!) This is NOT technically a ‘hello’ word, but it doesn't fit well anywhere else. Shitsureishimasu translates literally as ‘I’m being rude', and is said when entering another person's office or workplace. O Jamashimasu, means ‘I’m in your way', and is used when entering another person's house or room. Oh yeah, it's not a language thing, but when visiting somebody else's house in Japan, it's customary to bring a small, wrapped gift.

Irasshaimase!/Irasshai!/Youkosou! -Welcome! (irasshaimase is commonly chorused at you by shop staff both on entering and just at random intervals when you're in the shop).

Saying Goodbye:

Sayounara (farewell/goodbye) -HORRIBLY MISUSED! Sayounara is not only quite formal, but it also implies that you will not see the person again for some time, maybe a day, maybe a week, maybe longer, maybe….NEVER! If you leave the house in the morning and say ‘sayounara’ to your mother, it kind of implies that you might not come back…ie….you're going to commit suicide. Yeah.

ittekimasu! (I'll be back later!) This is what you say when you leave your house. It literally means ‘I will go and return’. People remaining in the house, awaiting your return will say ‘itterashai’ ‘please go and return’. If you read manga or watch anime, you may know of the cliche of characters who feel responsible for the death of a loved one to whom they didn't say ‘itterashai’ to the morning they left and subsequently died in a random accident. Characters this cliche effects include Touru from Fruits Basket and Orihime from Bleach.
When getting home, be sure to say ‘Tadaima’ (I'm back!), to which people in the house reply ‘okaeri nasai’, or ‘okaeri!’ (welcome home). It may interest you to know that in Narita airport (Tokyo) beneath the words in English ‘Welcome to Japan’, the Japanese reads ‘okaeri nasai’ (welcome home).

bai bai! (bye bye) -Obviously taken from English, and has pretty much the same level or formality and the same meaning. Generally used among people in their twenties or below, who grew up with more western culture. More often used by girls than boys.

Ja/ sore ja/ ja ne/ ja mata/ mata ne (see you later) These are ALL different ways of saying ‘see ya!’ ‘bye!’ ‘seeya later!’ etc. Not for formal situations, used among friends.

O tukaresama deshita (thanks for your hard work) Say this after somebody who isn't of a higher social level than your own (so not your teacher/boss etc.) has finished work. With friends and classmates, you can just say ‘O tsukaresama’, or even just ‘O tsukaresan!’

O yasumi nasai (please rest now) This means ‘good night’. Though technically it's formal, it's a set phrase like ‘ittekimasu’ and so is used universally for people going to bed.

Saying ‘thanks’:

'Sumimasen' THE BEST WORD EVER! It means ‘thankyou’, ‘sorry’ and ‘excuse me’ and it's formal enough for most circumstances unless they require being particularly formal. Can be used at the start of a sentance to get attention politely, can be used on it's own as an apology or a word of thanks. VERY handy. A bit too formal to use with your friends though. For a casual version, say ‘sumanai’ or for VERY casual, ‘suman’.

'Doumo!' -(thanks!) Only used among friends. Casual.

'Arigatou' (thank you) on it's own, it's more formal than ‘doumo’, but not that formal. Again, used among friends.

'Doumo Arigatou' (thanks a lot!) a bit more formal, maybe for aquaintances around your own age.

'Doumo Arigatou Gozaimasu'/ Arigatou Gozaimasu (thank you very much!) Formal enough to be used for VIPs etc. Too formal for friends unless they did something AMAZING for you! To make this past tense, make it ‘Gozaimashita’.

Saying ‘Sorry’:
(obviously, see ‘sumimasen’ above) To put ‘sumimasen’ into past tense, apologising for something you did earlier, make it ‘sumimasen deshita’.

Moushi wake arimasen (I apologise sincerely) This is VERY FORMAL, as you'd guess from how I translated it. Don't use it with your friends. If you REALLY wanna push the boat out and have offended…er….I dunno, the queen, or a very strict teacher, use ‘Moushi wake gozaimasen’ WOW, THAT is REALLY SORRY! To make either of these past tense, stick ‘deshita’ on the end.

Gomenasai (forgive me) Probably a bit too informal for use with people who you don't know or are higher in status than you. For friends, you can just say ‘gomen’, or if it's just a little slip-up, ‘gomen, ne?’ (forgive me will ya?).

Shitsureishimasu/ Shitsureishimashita (I'm being rude/I've been rude/ offended you) The past tense (~shimashita)is for when you've opened your big mouth and offended somebody or inconvenienced them and want to apologise for rudeness. Obviously the earlier is in present/future tense and is to excuse yourself for doing something you feel may offend or get in the way of somebody.


…..Wow, that was a lot more than I expected to write. So there you go. No more need to just use ‘konnichiwa’ and ‘arigatou’ any more, now you can impress the pants off your readers with amazing use of contextual Japanese phrases!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
strong414bad at 1:46PM, Dec. 2, 2006
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I am amazed at a lack of a certain Mr. Roboto.
Why hello there.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:59PM
Darth Mongoose at 2:53PM, Dec. 2, 2006
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Dear Strong Bad,
Mention that song to me ever and I will go insane and kidnap The Cheat from you.
Crapfully yours,
Kate, UK
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
subcultured at 3:34PM, Dec. 3, 2006
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HQuFW8N49M
J
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:00PM
strong414bad at 2:53PM, Dec. 5, 2006
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Darth Mongoose
Dear Strong Bad,
Mention that song to me ever and I will go insane and kidnap The Cheat from you.
Crapfully yours,
Kate, UK

Doumo Arigatou Mr. Roboto!
Why hello there.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:59PM
lothar at 3:44PM, Dec. 16, 2006
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i actually rather enjoy that song, but i make sure nobody can hear me listening to it in Japan !

thanks for the tips Darth, my Japanese is terrible, good to know what is polite and not , especialy when i have sub-Yochien vocabulary !!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:45PM
Claudia at 11:13PM, Dec. 18, 2006
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Wow such extensive work… I'm impressed!
I've barely done half a year in Japanese so some of this is more review……
It's hard to read romanized…… xD
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:42AM
Darth Mongoose at 1:54AM, Dec. 20, 2006
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I know, I find romaji hard to read myself, but I couldn't bet on most people here knowing their hiragana and katakana! Haha. Writing romaji feels really unnatural.

Okaaay, I'm having trouble thinking of topics on which to speak. Anybody got ideas or requests? I guess I could do something like ‘colours’ ‘days of the week’ ‘seasons’…you know, nouns that are used regularly. Or I could talk a little on life in Japan. Anybody?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
LunarYouko at 5:06AM, Dec. 21, 2006
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I'd like to hear a bit more about Japan myself. I've been fascinated with the art styles and language for a while, but know little about the couture itself.

And of course, any other words, or language use you have to share would be very much appreciated as well.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:49PM
subcultured at 11:33PM, Dec. 21, 2006
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japanese media is so weird, i'm kinda glad America is a little conservative with our stuff http://triggur.org/japanese/
J
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:00PM
LunarYouko at 4:37AM, Dec. 22, 2006
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O.o


…Ummm…. ew. just. ew.


>.<

Yeah. That's a little disturbing…. a lot disturbing. But then… not all of their media is like that… I don't think… I hope…

Ugh…. should've read the NSFW thing… *shiver*
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:49PM
lothar at 6:19AM, Dec. 23, 2006
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yea ! talk about life in Japan !! like NORMAL life , not that samurai stuff. like , modern stuff. that would be interesting !
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:45PM
Darth Mongoose at 6:50AM, Dec. 23, 2006
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The problem is that any old idiot can post weird crap from Japan, and people will believe that the whole of Japan is like that.

Yes, they have ‘adult’ videogames, manga, and a very large porn industry, and they don't try to hide it, and aren't like western nations in that they don't all pretend it doesn't really exist. They have special ‘Love Hotels’ for couples who want to have sex in private and all video and book stores have a large ‘adult’ section. This stuff doesn't get in the way of everyday life though, and can easily be avoided or ignored if it's not something you're interested in.
The thing people don't understand about the Japanese is that they take things to extremes. They have a different base of morals too, so of course some things they make or enjoy will upset western sensibilities. They think it's absolutely disgusting that we walk into houses with our shoes on, wear everyday clothes that show the navel or cleavage and don't fold our clothes! Lots of people think that the moment you turn on a Japanese TV, you'll get KAH-RAY-ZEE! Shenanigans such as sadistic gameshows, porn or hyper-violent anime. Truth is, 95% of the time when you turn on the TV in Japan, you will get:
-News. Of which there is actually very little in Japan due to a low crimerate and people not really wanting to hear about anything particularly nasty, so it consists of ‘today in Nagoya, it is hot. Yes, it’s hot, isn't it? Mmm, it's hot today. Yes, it's very hot…
-Shows in which Japanese celebrities eat Japanese food and say how delicious it is. These make up the bulk of Japanese TV, it seems. ‘Oishii!’ ‘Umai!’ ‘Wow,this tastes good! Yes, it tastes good! Doesn’t it taste good? Mm, it tastes good…
-Shows in which Japanese celebrities talk about stuff and say how interesting it is. Wow! That's interesting! Yes, it's very interesting, isn't it? I think it's interesting. Yeah, that's interesting…
-Very cheesy, boring soap operas.
-Very cheesy, boring samurai period dramas, which consist entirely of people in kimono speaking in a dull monologue about how can they decide between love and honour!?
-If you're lucky, you might catch some anime, but it'll probably be a children's show, even if you're lucky, it'll be a popular shounen jump thing, not something awesome like Cowboy Beebop or Evangelion.

In fact, Japanese TV is SO boring that we started watching it just for the commercials (which ARE pretty wacky and fun) after the first two weeks, and then after the first two months had pretty much given up on watching it altogether!

So there you go. Unless you SPECIFICALLY go looking for weird stuff in Japanese media, you're highly unlikely to find anything worse than you could get in a ‘Playboy’. Though when they DO make strange stuff, they push the limits pretty far, as averages go, the Japanese media actually has notably less violence, nudity and sex than that of many Western countries. Certainly less than England.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
lothar at 8:41AM, Dec. 23, 2006
(online)
posts: 1,299
joined: 1-3-2006
hahahaha ZOMG !!! lmao
that is soo true
especialy the OISHII crowd !!! that has got to be the most commonly used word on Japanese tv !
and the news , the only thing more boring than watchin the news in Japanese is watching the English translation .
I've found that the most interesting thing on tv is the NHK kids shows , with Konishiki dressed as a giant pinapple and Pitagora switch !!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:45PM
Warspritecomic at 11:59AM, Dec. 23, 2006
(online)
posts: 343
joined: 3-10-2006
I don't really believe all that stuff. I think it's basically the same as anywhere else in the world apart from they usually have technology there sooner than us

P.s. Would Oniryu make sense as a name? I think it means male dragon from the little japanese I know (I only know that Oniichan is brother and chan is some kind of formal word like calling someone friend >_<)
FIGHTSPLOSION 5!!! IT HAS 2 ALIENS, A PIRATE, A HORNY NINJA AND A HOMOCIDAL FIRE PRODUCING PENGUIN! AND A BIRD WOMAN AND A CAT WOMAN!

Also a mute that reminds me of Johnny Bravo and Samuel L Jackson at the same time!
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:48PM
Darth Mongoose at 1:57PM, Dec. 23, 2006
(online)
posts: 488
joined: 1-7-2006
Since ‘Oni’ can mean ‘Demon’ and ‘Ryu’ can mean ‘Dragon’, I am now imagining that the name is ‘Demondragon’ 0_o' eek.
Oniisan DOES mean ‘older brother’, but you're using it incorrectly. The ‘O’ at the start is an honourable ‘o’ added to the title, also the kanji that makes up the ‘nii’ would, if used in a name, be read as ‘Ani’, so it's probably not ‘Brother dragon’.
Better names for a male character with a name implying ‘Dragon’ would be:
Ryusuke, Ryumaru, Ryu, Ryuou, Ryuichi. Other things could be added to it to make a more complex name, but these ones are simple and natural sounding names.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:08PM
Warspritecomic at 2:24PM, Dec. 23, 2006
(online)
posts: 343
joined: 3-10-2006
Meh. I wasn't actually going to use it. Though of it on the spot. Thanks for clarifying that though. For some strange reason, I'm kinda interested in this. Unfortunatly I still have to have another 5 years before I can choose to do lessons like Japanese ^_^

Edit: I'm glad I finished one of my comics. I got a name from my firend (Sonanasuke)and by the look of it, I don't think that's a fitting name for a villain ¬_¬
FIGHTSPLOSION 5!!! IT HAS 2 ALIENS, A PIRATE, A HORNY NINJA AND A HOMOCIDAL FIRE PRODUCING PENGUIN! AND A BIRD WOMAN AND A CAT WOMAN!

Also a mute that reminds me of Johnny Bravo and Samuel L Jackson at the same time!
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:48PM

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