Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Line thickness...
Soryko at 6:26PM, April 12, 2010
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So, I'm doing digital art, and I don't want my lines to look so flat anymore. .n.
I know changing the thickness of lines helps, but I'm a lil confused…
Where should the lines be thickest? Where the shadows should be or…?
I wish my tablet had the pressure thing on it. XD

Meh, hopefully my question makes sense. >>;
I've been kinda making them thick wherever it feels right, so I guess I'm wondering if theirs a better way to go about it. xD
Remember that you are unique! Just like everyone else! ^w^
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:50PM
DrBob at 9:11PM, April 12, 2010
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Depends on the style of art you're going for. To get away from a flat look, I would imagine where you think the light is coming from and putting thicker lines on the shadow side of the figure. Also, joints are a great place to put a little thickness (knees, elbows, neck, hips, wrists, etc.). You'd be amazed how a little extra thickness in those areas can really punch up a line drawing. Those would be my two main suggestions.

Update: I was practicing using my digital tablet, and I thought I'd kill two birds with one stone and show you what I'm talking about. The first image is the base line image, all one thickness. The second image has some extra thicknesses and shadows thrown into the picture. The last image highlights all the areas I added the thicker lines. As I mentioned before, I focused on the joints; the neck, the underarm, the wrists, the crotch, the knees, and the ankles. A little extra thickness in places like that can change a flat line drawing into something that has some depth to it. I hope this helps!


last edited on July 14, 2011 12:16PM
Soryko at 11:42AM, April 15, 2010
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That does help. :D Thanks! I love that you gave an actual example too. xD <3
Remember that you are unique! Just like everyone else! ^w^
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:50PM
skoolmunkee at 6:09AM, April 16, 2010
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It also helps to give thicker lines to things more in the foreground, and thinner lines to ones in the background. That adds visual weight to the important part of the picture (assuming it's the foreground where the focus should be) and helps distinguish people/things from what is going on behind them.

If you have a look at this page you can see some examples of what I mean: http://www.drunkduck.com/Made_Up_Stories/index.php?p=523315

In the first panel there's no ‘lines’ in the background at all, just shapes to indicate what's behind them without detracting from their visual weight.

In the third panel, the woman and mannequin in the front have slightly thicker lines because they are closer to the point of view. The background and people in the background are made up of thinner, more regular lines so they ‘fade’ visually a bit.


What I can't find an example of is the opposite (foreground done in very light lines and background done in heavier, more direct ones)… but you'd want to do something like that if it's the background which is important, like a panoramic panel, etc.
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:43PM
Soryko at 6:50AM, April 16, 2010
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Ah alright. owo That makes sense. Thanks! I'll be sure to try that out. >u<
Remember that you are unique! Just like everyone else! ^w^
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:50PM

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