Debate and Discussion

Listen to a deaf's Ranting
Insane Angelic at 12:24PM, July 16, 2007
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Dear readers, before you start reading this, please be aware that I am Deaf, is 15 year old, not that good at english, and be aware that I may won't act my age in this post!

I CAN ACT LIKE A WHINY 10 YEARS OLD AND A MATURE 21 YEARS OLD IF I WANT TO!
This, of course, is a other rant for a other day. Now for my current rant of the day…

Get ready. It's long.
Ahem.
When you're deaf and you try to mix in normal, hearing people, there will be trouble, there will be doubts, even if you're having IQ of 300 and are a sportif. If you mess up a little, to them, you're done, ka-boom, finished- unable to do this. But there's normal, hearing people who messed big time, and it's ‘'okay’' to the others.

===Frusting events about getting a job…or study for one!===

*** Studying teaching Swimming lesson ***
Now, I'm working to become a swimming teacher to be able to teach other deafs kids how to swim. And since i'm the first one to do this… two groups- (I dunno, they're like the boss of the piscine.) is following me very closely. So closely they can smell my fart.
Anyways, I worked very hard for it, set up my lesson, and that stuff. I'm doing better than the others normal- hearing students students who's in my class- simply because I work harder.
Then the last day came. THE FREAKEN'N last day. I messed it up almost completely. And then the teacher- god, her eyes- looked at me like i've messed up my whole lesson from the start. She spoke to me, telling me things that my brain translated into:
“Maybe it's better if you don't become a teacher because you're deaf and unable to communte with normal, hearing kids.”
Now. Now. I AM able to communte with normal kids, allrightly. As long as they're in the reading age, I will do just fine. As for little kids who doesn't know how to read- they're all games and fun. No talking needed and no chanting, because there's a music coming from a box. And… I'm better then everone because I'm the ONLY one who took the WHOLE FREAK'N lesson from the start to the end- level 1 to 12, gained three shiny medillons, studied for lifesaver. (I dropped it because one needs to be able to hear to work- and I understand it. It's got good raison.)Not to menton I gained the ‘Rookie’ papier.
And what become of the others? They're in the racing swimming since the start, so they lack skill and pratice.

To be a swimming teacher, one must know the skills of swimming very well and be able to talk to the kids. And…so if I am deaf. There's some deaf person out there who is a teacher.


So why not a swimming teacher while we're at it?
Needless to say…. I passed my lesson very well. My next and final lesson to becoming a teacher is in augest, but I will wait for the next year because I deemed that I'm too unfit right now to do it.

***Others jobs***

I don't have any real jobs because… I don't think anyone in my town wants to hire me for working- even if it's for free. I knew it because each time when my mom or father joked to someone about hiring me for work, they looked at me and is like,
'No my god, not that girl. Anyone but her.'
I think I only once did a small job- watching two kids for someone- and that's only because the parents wouldn't find anyone to keep their kids and had to call me at the last minute.

I did very good and the kids are overjoyed, but that's the last time I ever got that job… And I understand- I'll doubt a deaf's skill if one's watching over my own kids.
I work very hard, yet I'm…still the underdog. You'll all see, one day I'll make them pay by making them wishing they could've hired me earlier. Because I'm going to do something great- no matter how long it'll take me.
=====================

Thank you for reading my rant. Now have a nice day.
~Insane Angelic~

last edited on July 14, 2011 1:00PM
ZeroVX at 12:38PM, July 16, 2007
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Wow. That's rough. Real rough.

But hey, look at it this way. If it's rough now, then it'll definitely get better later on! You'll get a high-paying job, get married, settle down with a kid or two, etc.

Just hang in there! When they see how good you'll do, they'll beg for you to work for them!
“If our own government was responsible for the deaths of almost 100,000 people…..would you really wanna know?”

V for Vendetta, V.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:58PM
EmilyTheStrange at 12:47PM, July 16, 2007
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Oh man. O_O

I can't imagine how hard that must be for you! You seem capible of doing everything someone who can hear can, yet they look down on you for one little mistake. However, because it seems like you stick things out to prove to others what you can do, I'm sure you are going to be very successful in whatever you choose to do. Just show them you kick everyone eles' arse! >.D
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:21PM
TheMidge28 at 1:12PM, July 16, 2007
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I preface this statement that I am not deaf and that this is not supposed to be offensive…

I understand its hard and you feel people look down on you or won't give you a chance.
I just have to say we all have are own struggles and I don't want make it sound like yours are trivial, but can you imagine it worst for someone else? I mean could it be worse? I think of Helen Keller and I think most people think of her when they think of a deaf person and they think also of the play/movie The Miracle Worker. Back in her time she was deaf and blind and treated as a savage. No one could get through to her. But someone took the time and did give her chance and she came out of it so much better. In light of what she went through and how she was treated and how she lived I think you have it good. You can communicate to others especially now with this forum. But it is not as bad as it seems and each of us deal with struggles in there own respect and degree.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:20PM
Aurora Moon at 1:18PM, July 16, 2007
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Man, as another deaf person, I can totally relate!

Yeah, it's real tough being an deaf girl trying to get an good job. Even when the hearing people out there claim that they're not being discrimatory against us, their actions at times sure says the exact oppsite.

I hate how some people out there act like we're super-retarded just because we don't “Hear normally”. or when they feel the need to speak very loudly around me at the exact moment I happen to be wearing my hearing aids. Oh, it's hell on my ears when they do that!! That's the same exact reason why I don't like to wear my hearing aids that often.

You see, I'm deaf, but I can only hear really, really loud noises. As in it has to be ear-shattering loud. and as soon as that information gets out to other certain people… those same people think that if they speak loudly to the point of almost screaming then I'd be able to hear them speak like a hearing person could.
Pfft. yeah, right. All it does is make them look rude and competely ingorant!

I used to work at a fast food place… and I had this manager that would follow me around and say stupid things like: “Remember, don't put anything flammable near the flames… don't put your hands on the burner without checking if it's turned on or not… blah blah” like I was some damn kid.
As manager, one would think that he had better things to do other than stalk some deaf girl around the workplace just because he kept on thinking that the deaf girl would mess up!
It was too much for me, and I quit.

Oh, and the other thing I hate? When hearing people go “but I feel so sorry for you! You wouldn't be able to enjoy things like music!!”
Which my response to would be: “Uh, yes… I DO enjoy music! After all, I have hearing aids and the like. Seriously guys, I'm not missing out on anything… so quit feeling sorry for me!”

I'm sure you totally know what I mean.
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:10AM
Puff at 1:46PM, July 16, 2007
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To me, being deaf doesn't seem like something someone would descriminate against. Obviously there are some jobs where you need hearing, but a lot of times not at all. I mean, a deaf person could just as easily be a coach of a football team or be a computer designer or, well, all sorts of things, as well as someone who can hear. Blind people, I can understand how they could have a harder time. Sounds aren't as important in a majority of jobs, seeing is.

Maybe the town you live in is just really really biggoted. I have NEVER heard of people descriminating against the deaf, and I've known 4 very closely in my life, three adults and one girl my age. If I were you I'd move out when I was 18. :\
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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:54PM
marine at 2:40PM, July 16, 2007
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Aurora Moon
I used to work at a fast food place… and I had this manager that would follow me around and say stupid things like: “Remember, don't put anything flammable near the flames… don't put your hands on the burner without checking if it's turned on or not… blah blah” like I was some damn kid.
As manager, one would think that he had better things to do other than stalk some deaf girl around the workplace just because he kept on thinking that the deaf girl would mess up!
It was too much for me, and I quit.

As an internet friend of yours, that pisses me off. Should've sued for discrimination and had your American Dream fulfilled.

I think I know why they assume deaf people are retarded: deaf people talk differently. Thats it. To the laymens of the world, a deaf person would sound mentally handicapped, or “retarded” to them. Most of those people that think of others in such a negative way ain't exactly the brightest bulbs in the bunch themselves.

A scene from my name is Earl reminds me of this. Jamie Presly (Earl's ex wife) is going on trial for something and her lawyer is a deaf woman. She gets confused by her and thinks she has a retarded lawyer. Its not as subtle like it would've been on King of the Hill, but its something that happens. The “lesser” people of the world that don't take time out to read and understand things, or worse, the ones who do and don't comprehend what they're reading, don't know how the fuck to react to someone that talks gibberish.

Personally, I could ask questions all day and still never really understand what its like for you dudes. I couldn't really imagine not being able to talk or not hearing the world like I do. Let alone being blind, crippled, or anything else like that. So I feel bad for your problems..

also..

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last edited on July 14, 2011 1:52PM
Aurora Moon at 2:53PM, July 16, 2007
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well, to be fair… it's not so much being an bigot, it's the fact that some hearing people tends to see all “disablities” as the same. if you're “missing” something that an “normal” human don't have, then there has to be something wrong with you and possibly might make you “defective” somehow.

To them, being deaf is being the same as being blind, in an wheelchair or whatever other disablity you can think of.

So those certain types of people with such logic then do the following:
1. trying to “fix” things about an person that doesn't need to be fixed, trying to make the said “defective” person be more normal and just like them.

2. act very uncomfortable around the said person, subconicously thinking of the said person as “lacking”, and that results in them treating that said person differently than everyone else, and most likely not in a good way.

Those same people can't wrap thier heads around the fact that EACH “disablity” is competely different from each other, and shouldn't be lumped together into a group where they picture all the people to be helpless in some way and needing help.

They also forget that everyone is always lacking something, even if they're born “normal” and were always “normal”. Everyone has thier own major weaknesses and thier strengths. and even if a person was to “lack” something, like the ablity to hear normally… it's not something that renders the person competely helpless… it's just simply who the person is. it's a part of that person.
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:10AM
mlai at 3:50PM, July 16, 2007
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They may be talking loudly to you because they equate your condition with elderly who are hard of hearing. Which, from your description, is what you have. Elderly ppl who are hard of hearing frequently ask you to talk louder, even if they are wearing their hearing aids.

Just tell them that they don't need to shout when you're wearing your aid, because yours is well calibrated, unlike those of old folks. If you don't talk about it, ppl would assume it's taboo to learn about it, then they make their own judgements.

FIGHT current chapter: Filling In The Gaps
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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:05PM
Memmy at 9:44PM, July 16, 2007
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I have a great friend and her goal right now in her life is to earn degrees and graduate as a certified History/Geography teacher. She wants to teach either mainstreamed middle school or HS.

Her hearing loss is so severe that hearing aids barely helps and she's not eligible for cochlear implant. She signs all the times, her grammar is horrible (worse than yours or mine, actually) and people kept telling her that she should not teach in a hearing school. You know what? She told em to go to hell.

Yup, thats my best friend and I'm behind her 100%.

You shouldnt let people let you down because they think disabled people are limted compared to what everyday people can do. Those are the kind of people who see that the disabled are less than what a normal person is because they're missing hearings, sights, limbs, or whatever.


You need to remind your teachers that you worked hard with the lessons. That you have your goals and that you belive in your heart that you CAN do it. It is not her place to tell you what you should do or not do. That choice is your choice and only yours to make.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:59PM
Aurora Moon at 4:39AM, July 17, 2007
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mlai
They may be talking loudly to you because they equate your condition with elderly who are hard of hearing. Which, from your description, is what you have. Elderly ppl who are hard of hearing frequently ask you to talk louder, even if they are wearing their hearing aids.

Just tell them that they don't need to shout when you're wearing your aid, because yours is well calibrated, unlike those of old folks. If you don't talk about it, ppl would assume it's taboo to learn about it, then they make their own judgements.

yeah, but that's the thing right there. my hearing loss isn't like an elderly person's hearing loss at all. Nothing at all like it.

you see, when I said really, really loud noises… I meant certain sounds at an certain pitch that an human voice cannot make. shouting loudly I can't really hear at all. And even if there was the rare occsion that I could hear them yelling I wouldn't be able to make out their words at all, because I hear SOUND, not words. If that makes sense to you.

And even if I have told them that repeatdly, there are still people who misunderstand and still compare it to something like an elderly person's hearing loss. Which is why I have basically given up on those people and stopped wearing my hearing aid that often so that I wouldn't have to put up with people who has a hard time understanding.
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:10AM
Ryan McLelland at 8:03AM, July 17, 2007
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Best thing about sign language is that even if someone doesn't understand ASL…they'll always know what you mean when you give them the finger.

No worries…no matter what age you are and whether you can hear or not…doesn't matter. People are jerks and they come in all sizes and forms… :)

last edited on July 14, 2011 3:15PM
TnTComic at 8:36AM, July 17, 2007
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Jim Kyte comes to mind.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:31PM
dueeast at 8:44AM, July 17, 2007
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Fascinating discussion. Aside from being blind for a day or so following an eye operation as a kid, which increased all of my senses permanently, I can't say I have personally had any disabilities. My wife has studied several of the sign languages and we have friends with relatives who are deaf, so we know a little on this topic.

I do think it's terrible what people do in ignorance towards other human beings. The talking loud and acting like the person is stupid is really insulting.

I am often impressed and inspired how people adapt to their disabilities and are just as accomplished (if not more so) as anyone else.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:17PM
Insane Angelic at 10:24AM, July 17, 2007
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TnTComic
Jim Kyte comes to mind.


Who? I don't know who he is.


I know there's people who are worser off than me, but I'm just venting my anger and my frustation here.

I, however, understand normal people's way… let's see. I don't know how it's like to be blind, to be unable to see colors. I don't know how it's like to be able to hear- simply because I never has been done that.

Ignorance isn't always a bad thing. Also…. in the past, when there's less helping and stuff, deaf people looks stupid due to their lack of skill developpement because they lacks convenstation.




last edited on July 14, 2011 1:00PM
TnTComic at 10:36AM, July 17, 2007
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Insane Angelic
TnTComic
Jim Kyte comes to mind.


Who? I don't know who he is.


Jim Kyte was the first deaf player in the National Hockey League.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:31PM
Insane Angelic at 3:02PM, July 17, 2007
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TnTComic
Insane Angelic
TnTComic
Jim Kyte comes to mind.


Who? I don't know who he is.


Jim Kyte was the first deaf player in the National Hockey League.

Ah, intersing. :3
I didn't knew. Thanks for telling me this bit of information!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:00PM

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