Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Need some experienced advice!
ExecutionStyle at 3:12PM, March 18, 2008
(offline)
posts: 2
joined: 3-16-2008
I'm new to comic making and have some question. If you can answer any of my questions it would help tons! I realize the answers to these questions will be based on personal preference and that's just what I want. I'm still developing my own style and looking at other peoples processes gives me ideas for my own.

When drawing a comic page traditionally, on paper, what size paper do you prefer? Do you use a paper that is larger than the size you plan to have printed?

When you draw comic panels digitally how large would you say your average panel is(in pixels)? Do you draw all your panels large and then scale them down?
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:24PM
korosu at 5:05PM, March 18, 2008
(online)
posts: 1,063
joined: 1-28-2006
Oh, you should definitely work bigger than what the final product will be. Back in the day when I was just starting off on my comic, I just used 8.5x11 in. printing paper for the art and inking. After scanning the page, it automatically gets enlarged to a size fair enough for the coloring, text, etc.

Digitally speaking, most comics are around the 600x800 pixels range, but you definitely don't want to start working with a page that small. It's easier to work in details with a large document; also, small mistakes aren't as obvious after you've scaled it down. (For me, I start off with a 2070x2680 pixels document, and scale it down to 613x850 when doing the last touch-ups and such.)

Most panels would be, I would say, about 200x300 pixels each. Of course, panel sizes don't really matter a whole lot; it all just depends on what you're planning on putting in that panel. Some scenes may need larger or smaller panels. I make my panels large in the beginning because, again, I start off large. The panels get sized down when the whole page does.

Hope this helps, and good luck!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:21PM
ExecutionStyle at 6:57PM, March 18, 2008
(offline)
posts: 2
joined: 3-16-2008
korosu
Oh, you should definitely work bigger than what the final product will be. Back in the day when I was just starting off on my comic, I just used 8.5x11 in. printing paper for the art and inking. After scanning the page, it automatically gets enlarged to a size fair enough for the coloring, text, etc.

Digitally speaking, most comics are around the 600x800 pixels range, but you definitely don't want to start working with a page that small. It's easier to work in details with a large document; also, small mistakes aren't as obvious after you've scaled it down. (For me, I start off with a 2070x2680 pixels document, and scale it down to 613x850 when doing the last touch-ups and such.)

Most panels would be, I would say, about 200x300 pixels each. Of course, panel sizes don't really matter a whole lot; it all just depends on what you're planning on putting in that panel. Some scenes may need larger or smaller panels. I make my panels large in the beginning because, again, I start off large. The panels get sized down when the whole page does.

Hope this helps, and good luck!

Huge help!
Thanks a lot. :D
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:24PM
angry_black_guy at 7:11PM, March 18, 2008
(offline)
posts: 317
joined: 5-1-2007
You don't have to quote an entire post above you.

Traditionally (like, back in the days before digital crap existed) the original comic was drawn on paper that was 33% larger than the final product and the colorer would then go over the inks on a translucent acetate sheet similar to cel-animation. I use a wide variety of paper, but I prefer 10x12 and 15x20 when I paint my comics. I have a flat bed scanner, but my work is so large I have to digitally combine it in photoshop which gets annoying after a while.

Once again, traditional digital files are scanned at 600dpi (dots per inch) for the line work, inked, resized to 300dpi, colored, then resized AGAIN to 72dpi for web publishing (or simply saved as 300dpi TIF files for real printing). Most photo editing software like Photoshop and Painter give you the option of choosing your resolution when resizing and 72dpi is essentially the “magic” number. It's not the PERFECT resolution, but it gives you a decent size for most monitors and doesn't degrade the work to the point where it looks bad. Most people nowadays use a vector conversion tool like Illustrator to convert their pixel art to vector art. Vector art doesn't pixelize when resized (we call this artifacting and it happens because the computer adds or subtracts pixels when you resize; this doesn't happen in vector art).

As far as panel size works, that depends on your layout. Personally, I prefer the traditional 3x3 panel set up but some people experiment with panels and they can seriously be as big or small as you want. The important thing is that each panel conveys a sense of action or atmosphere and you must remember to balance art with text. Too much text and the panel feels crowded but scrunching a word balloon around the text gives your work a very amateur feeling.

last edited on July 14, 2011 10:52AM
Frostflowers at 1:41AM, March 19, 2008
(online)
posts: 689
joined: 10-8-2006
I do all my work digitally these days, and I start out on a 1242x1752 pixel canvas, which I then scale down to 709x1000 pixels. I could probably start out bigger and scale down smaller, but it's a comfortable size for me - back when I scanned my work in (at 300 dpi), 1242x1752 was the size they came out at, so I've just sort of kept up the habit.


As for panels… It all depends on what kind of comic you're doing, and what your preference is. Some people like to work with three panels, some with the comic book traditional nine-panel grid - I tend to vary mine, all the way from single-panel splash pages to the more busty pages that have up to six or seven panels on them. Also, not all of my panels are square - I like diagonal lines, so there's a lot of those.
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
lba at 4:48PM, March 19, 2008
(online)
posts: 2,684
joined: 5-29-2007
I work slightly differently than everyone else so I don't know how much help my method would be, but I work on 8x10 illustration boards and draw each character big enough to fill up the entire board. I then scan them in at 300 dpi do ink and colour then change the pixel width to 600 and post them. I do it that way, because with my single panel comics it seems to give the best resolution to be read on a variety of monitors and it means I have less jpeg files to keep on my computer for printing purposes than if I kept a 300 dpi and a 72 dpi image.

I typically don't bother with panels, but on the rare occasions I do I try to vary them as much as possible in their layout. I tend to get bored if I'm just seeing the same 3x3 layout and a lot of times I like to give more attention to certain panels in a page.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:29PM
Daiconv at 10:31AM, March 21, 2008
(online)
posts: 133
joined: 2-7-2008
I usually work double size because when you scale it down, it hides a lot of mistakes and thins out your lines. I use 11x17 printer paper.

I don't do my panels on the cpu, I just use a clear plastic ruler. It has a grid printed on it so that you can keep your lines parallel.

If I was going to do panels on the computer, I would just zoom all the way in. That will give you pretty much the same result as working big and shrinking it down.
without buttcheecks, it's just a hole.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:03PM
Leo The cat at 5:14PM, March 29, 2008
(offline)
posts: 20
joined: 3-26-2008
i dont do on paper but heres a tip:

First Sketch your drawing with a pencil or pencil tool then ink your drawing like other comics!
i like juice
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:34PM

Forgot Password
©2011 WOWIO, Inc. All Rights Reserved