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On American horror films
kyupol at 6:39AM, Jan. 19, 2008
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Why are they not scary at all?

In fact, I get more scared watching American documentaries.

Any explanation?
NOW UPDATING!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:25PM
LIZARD_B1TE at 6:54AM, Jan. 19, 2008
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Well, you see, American Horror Film Makers follow the following logic pattern:

Death = Unknown
Unknown = Scary
Scary = Horror
Therefore, Death = Horror

Death = Fatal Injury
Fatal Injury = Blood
Therefore, Blood = Horror

Now, let's combine them

Action = Fighting
Fighting = Injury
Injury = Blood
Blood = Death
Death = Unknown
Unknown = Scary
Scary = Horror
Therefore, Action = Horror

So, Horror Movie Makers believe that Action Films qualify as Scary, as long as you add monsters.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:37PM
SarahN at 2:45PM, Jan. 19, 2008
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You forgot that nowadays American horror film-makers are afraid to take anything too far when it comes to psychological stuff.

That's why I thought 1408 was lame. It started out really intense…after that it tried to be gritty, but it just ended up being boring because they didn't take it far enough. (And who the hell was that ghost with the knife? Richard Simmons?)
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:23PM
Ziffy88 at 3:42PM, Jan. 19, 2008
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They really don't try that much anymore. Which is why Cloverfield worked alot better as a horror movie…though I'm so jaded with horror that it really didn't phase me. They need to realize that one's imagination is much better than what one sees.
last edited on July 14, 2011 5:02PM
Arashi_san at 7:05PM, Jan. 19, 2008
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SarahN
You forgot that nowadays American horror film-makers are afraid to take anything too far when it comes to psychological stuff.

That's why I thought 1408 was lame. It started out really intense…after that it tried to be gritty, but it just ended up being boring because they didn't take it far enough. (And who the hell was that ghost with the knife? Richard Simmons?)

Really? I thought it was a really good movie that had much more affect than almost any other “horror” movies out there.

Quite often, those who attempt to pique at psycological horror end up looking stupid and are more funny than scary, or just end up fitting better in a different genre. And a lot of directors who are intent on making a scary movie just make stupid slashers like Texas Chainsaw Massacre or Hostile. And one of the saddest things is that people fall for simple slashers and some even call “good movies.”

I will confess, though, that after seeing Texas Chainsaw Massacre I grew a strong aversion for chainsaws.
shifting in the wind… is a baby.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:00AM
Ziffy88 at 8:16PM, Jan. 19, 2008
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slashers can be a good movie but really after Halloween(original minus all sequels and remakes) people seemed to miss the brilliance of it
last edited on July 14, 2011 5:02PM
kingofsnake at 8:29PM, Jan. 19, 2008
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The first halloween was really good. Unsettling suspense cinematography is a thing of the past, unfortunately. Nowadays horror is snuff.

I really don't get scared by horror movies, regardless of where their from. The only movies that ever got me scared were Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, the build of suspense in that was simply amazing.

And Ghostbusters, when Rick Moranis was running from Zuul and he was banging on the resteraunt window and all the people just watched him get killed and then went back to their dinner…but then I was like 8.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:16PM
Ziffy88 at 9:11PM, Jan. 19, 2008
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Hitchcock said it best It's not pulling the trigger but building the suspense to pulling the trigger
last edited on July 14, 2011 5:02PM
usedbooks at 11:18PM, Jan. 19, 2008
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kingofsnake
And Ghostbusters, when Rick Moranis was running from Zuul and he was banging on the resteraunt window and all the people just watched him get killed and then went back to their dinner…but then I was like 8.
Ghostbusters didn't scare me as a kid – but Ghostbusters II terrified me. The part with the mysterious goo flowing out of the faucet is what scared me the most. It was just… too… mysterious.

Honestly, I think that really explains it. Gore is disturbing but it isn't “scary.” Fear lies in the unknown and in things that just aren't the way they are supposed to be. What would terrify me most would be to see something reflected in a mirror that is not in the room – or vice versa – not some crazed lunatic hacking people up. Mortality is at least “natural.” Something that calls into question all you know about the very basics of the universe… that is frightening.

Oh, and I think part of the problem is the tendency toward remakes and sequels. If it was done before, it isn't scary because it lacks uncertainty. (That and people forgetting the very basics of “horror.” All these gory films are simply categorized improperly. :-P )
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:37PM
Exzachly at 3:56AM, Jan. 20, 2008
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The “American” thing is throwing me off here. Is there some culture's horror movies that actually are consistently scary? Because all the international horror movies I've seen lately have been a let down too.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:24PM

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