Debate and Discussion

Online personalities. Discuss?
ozoneocean at 2:40PM, June 4, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
Are people's online personas a good representation of how they are in real life?

When I was doing my post-grad work in interactive multimedia, the Professor of communications theory at my uni seemed to think that it was. That’s interesting, because it would suggest that whatever identity you create, no matter how silly, venal, hilarious, or whatever, is just another aspect of who you really are. So Marine, really is Princess Jen. Not that he’s necessarily female, a drug addict, or homeless, (those details are largely irrelevant), it’s the personality and the attitude that carries across.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
SpANG at 3:06PM, June 4, 2006
(online)
posts: 3,105
joined: 1-1-2006
ozoneocean
Now how about this: Are people's online personas a good representation of how they are in real life?

When I was doing my post-grad work in interactive multimedia, the Professor of communications theory at my uni seemed to think that it was. That’s interesting, because it would suggest that whatever identity you create, no matter how silly, venal, hilarious, or whatever, is just another aspect of who you really are. So Marine, really is Princess Jen. Not that he’s necessarily female, a drug addict, or homeless, (those details are largely irrelevant), it’s the personality and the attitude that carries across.

I guess that's true, but it's sort of broad, isn't it? Everybody's persona has something that is similar to them in r/l. But isn't that a given? Once you create a persona, isn't it part of you? Or, opposite, isn't it part of you before you even create it? Further, how does one identify what part of the personallity is false and what is true? And couldn't the same thing be said for characters created in comics and other media?

Maybe your question has completely gone over my head, though. :oops:

The other side of my brain is telling me that there are a lot of people that act the exact opposite of what they would in r/l. Annonymity is one of the best and worse things on the internet. It's great because you can say anything you want. But it's bad for the same reason. :?

.: SpANG! :.
“To a rational mind, nothing is inexplicable. Only unexplained.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:51PM
ozoneocean at 3:33PM, June 4, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
Well SpANG, I just wanted the general question to be broader than it was, in answering it’s perfectly fine to narrow things down, especially when providing instances. The Tater quandary is a good example of that actually! :-D

Maybe anonymity is just a good way for people to actually show their true selves? It’s like alcohol, they say you never really know someone until you see them drunk. Anonymity removes constraints from people… It’s not always a good thing to really know someone. I’m pretty much the same whatever I do, when I’m drunk I just get sillier, laugh a lot more and make more cutting comments.

But coming back to that thing I mentioned about people’s personalities and attitudes carrying across to other identities; perhaps that’s the way to recognise someone whoever they are? That’s why I’d tend to doubt that Marine would be Tater, because Tater is more earnest. Marine never really gives a fuck. I could be wrong though.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
SpANG at 3:40PM, June 4, 2006
(online)
posts: 3,105
joined: 1-1-2006
Marine never really gives a fuck.
Oh, no. I highly doubt that. I wrote something (that I proabably should not have- out of anger) that really bothered him. He mentioned it several times. He's actually a little deeper than people give him credit for.

Now, marine IS a performance ‘artist’. He does things sometimes just to see how people react. Then he sits back and enjoys the ripple he has made in the pond. :wink:

.: SpANG! :.
“To a rational mind, nothing is inexplicable. Only unexplained.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:51PM
Aurora Moon at 4:53PM, June 4, 2006
(offline)
posts: 2,630
joined: 1-7-2006
hmm. I don't see why some people feel like they have to create mupltitie perosnalites online for the heck of it.

but then again, don't listen to me. I used to pretend that I was actually an Domtratix Queen from a planet far away that had over 10 slaves of both females and males, and that I was plotting to take over the earth to turn everyone into my slaves on a messageboard once.

That was fun. “Don't talk back to me, puny human! adress your Queen with proper respect! or else I'll be forced to give you a few lashings with my whip or have you lick my boots! :x ”
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:09AM
SarahN at 10:19PM, June 4, 2006
(online)
posts: 1,581
joined: 1-1-2006
I think I'm basically myself on the internet…but it's a lot different than real talking still. In real life I'm terribly shy and can never start or keep up a good conversation with random people (the reason why I fear conventions)….unless I know you well and am comfortable with you.

I think I sound a bit more giddy on the internet though….
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:22PM
Terminal at 6:26AM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 5,505
joined: 1-6-2006
I'm nothing as what I am in real life. If I tried then I would make a pretty boring poster. I'm basically a shy, emotionless person that is scared of people. On the internet, you can do or say anything, you don't have to see that disappointing look in their eye.

Say, if I said something like, "omg, one time I downloaded porn, turned out it was gay porn, but I still enjoyed since they looked like girls.“ I would get serious looks of disdain and insults of me being a homosexual. If I said the same thing on the internet, I would get just a simple ”ew."

Now if another person said the same thing, (albit someone less creepy,) they would get a laugh. I'm tired of the judging of people based on their apperance. On the internet, that doesn't happen since we're all a tad creepy.

I don't meet you, you don't see me. But we can talk about anything.

sad part is I did download gay porn once.

.: Myxomatosis :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:09PM
AQua_ng at 10:26AM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 7,830
joined: 4-6-2006
ew.

What I find quite funny is when you compared someone on their web cam while they talk. As they type ‘Lol’, their face is of stone. Fre-kay.

Well, in real life, I am quite different compared to the interwebz. I stuuter sometimes, I hang around talking about, well, nothing. But we do sing together. You don't get that here. La.

Despite this, the internet has influenced how I act. I say ‘Canadia’ instead of Canada naturally and I do frequently say ‘lol’ and ‘interwebz’.

Speaking like a 12 year old forum member in real life is the in thing to do now.

K.A.L.A-dan! Brigade Captain :D
K.A.L.A.-dan forums!
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:54AM
ozoneocean at 12:15PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
So what I'm getting from most people here is they don't always act the same when contributing on the net as they do when interacting in real life. That doesn't make it any less “the real you”, you know. :)
Perhaps in many ways it's the “realer you”, because it allows you to be more open. You aren't hiding behind the way you look, your culture, skin colour, social status, clothing, sex, peer group, disability, etc
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
skoolmunkee at 12:24PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 7,058
joined: 1-2-2006
ozoneocean
So what I'm getting from most people here is they don't always act the same when contributing on the net as they do when interacting in real life. That doesn't make it any less “the real you”, you know. :)
Perhaps in many ways it's the “realer you”, because it allows you to be more open. You aren't hiding behind the way you look, your culture, skin colour, social status, clothing, sex, peer group, disability, etc

I really want to post something like ‘oh yeah well fuck you’ because I think it would be funny but then I feel guilty because I'm not that kind of person and so instead I'm posting this thought process in support of your argument.
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:38PM
Black_Kitty at 12:34PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 1,475
joined: 1-1-2006
ozoneocean
Perhaps in many ways it's the “realer you”, because it allows you to be more open. You aren't hiding behind the way you look, your culture, skin colour, social status, clothing, sex, peer group, disability, etc

Depending on the person, I think that's debatable. I know that while I'm not purposely deceiving people online, due to the nature of online communication, there is a slight difference between the online me and the real me. In real life, I can't plan out what I say, edit my posts/e-mails or even be as articulate. Online, you won't notice that sometimes I stumble over words, have trouble with eye contact, make hand gestures as I talk and repeat myself.

I'm still me but it's an edited me.

.: Black Kitty :.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:23AM
Marl at 12:56PM, June 5, 2006
(offline)
posts: 59
joined: 5-15-2006
Online personalities do exist - I'm sure you know people who are perfectly nice in real life, but can be a bit of an ass online. There are also people who are perfectly nice in real life, and perfectly nice online, too. There are asshats in real life who are asshats online. I've yet to meet someone who was an ass in real life, but nice on the net, however…

I propose the following hypothesis - There are two types of people on the net.

People like Skoolmunkee:
"I really want to post something like ‘oh yeah well fuck you’ because I think it would be funny but then I feel guilty because I'm not that kind of person and so instead I'm posting this thought process in support of your argument.“

People not like Skoolmunkee:

”I really want to post something like ‘oh yeah well fuck you’ because I think it would be funny."

Discuss!

(Edited fro bad speeling!)
“Rawglrglrglrglrgl!” quoth the murloc, his wrath inflamed.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:54PM
ozoneocean at 1:27PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
Marl
I propose the following hypothesis - There are two types of people on the net.

People like Skoolmunkee
People not like Skoolmunkee
It's the same thing. Skool is just showing how intelligent she is. :-D
Try and totally separate an online personality from yourself… Keep it up and make it absolutely not you. Would you even bother? And if you actually could do such a thing, how would you stop yourself from becoming that person or taking on the traits that you play? Even actors find it much easier to put aspects of themselves into their characters.

BK makes a good point: the edited you. But then it’s just an idealised you, the you you’d prefer others to see. Again, it’s no less real than any other version, if anything it’s purer because you’ve got space to better express yourself.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
Marl at 2:14PM, June 5, 2006
(offline)
posts: 59
joined: 5-15-2006
Perhaps. But then again, Skoolmunkee has the self-control to stop typing those sorts of things. Others don't. Hrmmm…

Ladies an gentlemen, I suggest we take this one stage DEEPER!

We must ask ourselves the question: If the online me is no less real than the “real world” me, what is reality? Where do we draw the line? Do we bother with a line at all? Is it actually squiggle shaped?

Discuss!

(Yes, I'm thoroughly enjoying this discussion. =) )
“Rawglrglrglrglrgl!” quoth the murloc, his wrath inflamed.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:54PM
ozoneocean at 2:34PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
Marl
We must ask ourselves the question: If the online me is no less real than the “real world” me, what is reality? Where do we draw the line? Do we bother with a line at all? Is it actually squiggle shaped?
That's just the point I've already made several times; there is no line. You are you, in all the ways you present yourself.
Your example with Skool is flawed; she has the control to do whatever she wants, including just writing “fuck you” if that’s what she really preferred. We’ve all got that level of control when we’re typing stuff on the net.

Maybe an even better question would be: Why do you want to draw a line?
Are you ashamed of some online behaviour? Would you prefer to disown, distance and disavow yourself from some immature, foolish, nasty, or pervy actions?
I find that idea highly amusing. :-D
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
Marl at 2:57PM, June 5, 2006
(offline)
posts: 59
joined: 5-15-2006
ozoneocean
Marl
We must ask ourselves the question: If the online me is no less real than the “real world” me, what is reality? Where do we draw the line? Do we bother with a line at all? Is it actually squiggle shaped?
That's just the point I've already made several times; there is no line. You are you, in all the ways you present yourself.
Your example with Skool is flawed; she has the control to do whatever she wants, including just writing “fuck you” if that’s what she really preferred. We’ve all got that level of control when we’re typing stuff on the net.

Maybe an even better question would be: Why do you want to draw a line?
Are you ashamed of some online behaviour? Would you prefer to disown, distance and disavow yourself from some immature, foolish, nasty, or pervy actions?
I find that idea highly amusing. :-D

*mutters* Curses, he's right and all. Either I carry on with this farce to the bitter end, or I find someone who has no control of their typing….

*Ahem*

I deny all knowledge of my immature, foolish, and nasty actions. The pervy ones are perfectly natural. *grin*

Hmm. Does this carry over to videogames? *looks around worriedly*

I've been known to shoot the hostages in Counterstrike so that the Counter-terrorists have no choice but to fight every last member of our team. >.>
“Rawglrglrglrglrgl!” quoth the murloc, his wrath inflamed.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:54PM
ccs1989 at 3:28PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 2,656
joined: 1-2-2006
The internet adds a lot of invulnerablility to one's personality. No one knows, from voice inflection or any other clues, the kind of ego or problems physically someone has by their posts or avatar. The only way to really know what they're like is by reading their posts. However that's not even fullproof.

In many ways the internet shows what people would be like if people all physically looked the same. Talking on the net is like socializing in a communist country.

…Sorta.
http://ccs1989.deviantart.com

“If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.”
-Henry David Thoreau, Walden
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:37AM
Mazoo at 3:47PM, June 5, 2006
(offline)
posts: 601
joined: 1-2-2006
I'm pretty much the same online as I am in real life, just as BK said before, an “edited” version.

I'm outgoing and even though I can edit some things I say on the forum, I'll still make awkward comments about things I don't know of. Such as, “What's a ‘doubleheader’?” when I didn't know what one was. (Baseball term). My friends who play baseball laugh and give me weird looks like I'm an idiot, and I'm sure many baseball players online would think the same thing.

I'm just generally an honest person. Essentially I'm just saying that I'm mostly the same online as I am in real life. :D
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:56PM
ccs1989 at 6:00PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 2,656
joined: 1-2-2006
Yeah, but there's also that stupid thing that when studying literature everything has to be symbolic. Example: In the Odyssey, Penelope leans against a column. Now apparently the column represents a phallic symbol, and shows that women rely on men subconciously.

Yeah, maybe that makes some sense, but maybe it was that her BACK was freakin tired and the greek architects were perverts.
http://ccs1989.deviantart.com

“If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.”
-Henry David Thoreau, Walden
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:37AM
Inkmonkey at 7:10PM, June 5, 2006
(online)
posts: 2,220
joined: 1-3-2006
Like my online persona, I make excessive use of semicolons; I'm pretty sure I'm using them wrong.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:59PM
Zwuh at 12:23AM, June 6, 2006
(offline)
posts: 271
joined: 1-1-2006
Lets make sure this doesn't turn into a “Well this is what MY personality is” thread, those belong in GD. Its okay to use yourself as an example, but discuss the topic, 'kay.
last edited on July 14, 2011 5:02PM
SpANG at 4:17AM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 3,105
joined: 1-1-2006
ozoneocean
Skool is just showing how intelligent she is. :-D
You're my favorite. :smt058

I dunno, I think it's fun sometimes to act in a way that isn't you- I think we all have internal boundaries though that we wouldn't cross. It may be fun and liberating to say ‘whatever we want’ but there are probably things a person would never say just because it's beyond their comfort level somehow. I never made any kind of effort to present myself differently online than in person, but that's because I just couldn't be bothered.

I suppose my viewpoint is that, on the Internet, the way people behave defines who they ‘are’ to others. You may be polite, well-spoken Steve in real life, but if you are the obnoxious and troublemaking SpANG! online then that is how anyone will know you. :twisted: Because of the impersonality, it would be easy for me to act like an ass (it's easy for anyone, hence why people on the Internet usually suck). But I don't really want someone to have that false impression of me.

In summary, I'm nice and smart and if you think I'm an ass, that's only because you've made me act that way toward you. :x
“To a rational mind, nothing is inexplicable. Only unexplained.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:51PM
SpANG at 9:44AM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 3,105
joined: 1-1-2006
Fri Feb 10
skoolmunkee
… the heroic and helpful SpANG!

Tue June 6
skoolmunkee
… the obnoxious and troublemaking SpANG!

Times change I guess. *sniff* :P

.: SpANG! :.
“To a rational mind, nothing is inexplicable. Only unexplained.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:51PM
ozoneocean at 10:10AM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
Shut up you obnoxious troublemaker, I’m the new favourite here! :-D

Yes, people do create certain impressions in people’s minds depending on how they act in certain circles, but that’s no different from any other sphere and no less them. We’ve all heard about those serial killers that “were always such nice quiet, helpful people who wouldn’t hurt a fly”. People just have sides you don’t always see, but they’re probably always there.

Thank god none of you can see the painful pimple on my otherwise lovely pointy nose…ow. It makes me look like a man-witch :(
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
SpANG at 10:15AM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 3,105
joined: 1-1-2006
ozoneocean
Shut up you obnoxious troublemaker, I’m the new favourite here! :-D

What are you talking about? You've always been everyone's favorite! You get along with everyone! Ya spinless, bend any way the wind blows yes-man. No offense. ;-P

So, you are saying that people lose thier inhabitions (if they have any) and become thier true selves online? Yeah, that's sorta what I was trying to say in my original post.

Maybe the person you are in r/l is the disguise, eh? :wink:

Sorry about the zit. :(

.: SpANG! :.
“To a rational mind, nothing is inexplicable. Only unexplained.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:51PM
AQua_ng at 11:22AM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 7,830
joined: 4-6-2006
In a sort of nutshell, an online persona is like the real you but in a tuxendo or gown.

There's still reminisents of you but you are dressed up, waiting to make a good first impression. And a second one. And a third. The apperence of you in your formal attire represents your core information online. Your avatar, name, sig etc.

The secondary layer of your ballroom clothes is your personalities themselves. You're probably with other people you do know personally or even heard of. You want to show off a bit, especcially if they're a higher status/title. They ask for a bit about yourself. You ‘tell’ them about yourself like your on/offline persona would, but you only tell 75% of it. Enough to get a good representation of yourselves, but enough to not reveal anything to nasty.

Of course there is always a personal accessorie that you always carry, that makes you you (e.g. Offline: a special necklace of wrist band, Online: I like Pokémon, I'm a lesbian, signing your screen name at the end of your posts).

Although there are some who do not take the whole prom very seriously and come in their normal clothes, thinking that their cool but in fact the opposite ensures. But each to their own.

Of course, there are some who take this social event as an oppotunity to be someone else, ala Romeo and Juliet. They could do this for mystery or for lust.

Well, that's the best analogy I could think off the cuff right now.

K.A.L.A-dan! Brigade Captain :D
K.A.L.A.-dan forums!
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:54AM
ozoneocean at 1:34PM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
SpANG!
Ya spinless, bend any way the wind blows yes-man. No offense. ;-P

So, you are saying that people lose thier inhabitions (if they have any) and become thier true selves online? Yeah, that's sorta what I was trying to say in my original post.
You know you love me ^_^
Yes, definitly that. :D

AQua_ng
In a sort of nutshell, an online persona is like the real you but in a tuxendo or gown.
Not quite Aqua, you're limiting the definitions of online personalities to their activities in places like this. And then only honest, nice manifestations, not stupid, dishonest, ugly characters like Tater Kain.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
AQua_ng at 1:38PM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 7,830
joined: 4-6-2006
:cry: I poured my soul into that post. You could be the one who may cause me to ker-emo.

K.A.L.A-dan! Brigade Captain :D
K.A.L.A.-dan forums!
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:54AM
ozoneocean at 1:48PM, June 6, 2006
(online)
posts: 24,799
joined: 1-2-2006
AQua_ng
:cry: I poured my soul into that post. You could be the one who may cause me to ker-emo.
:lol: Then how do you explain this: “Well, that's the best analogy I could think off the cuff right now.”

Don't worry, I didn't call it a pile of crap or anything! :D
No, it was nicely written man, and well thought out; it's just that your definition only covered a very limited aspect of online identity. Although it did cover that aspect very nicely and I don’t disagree with it. ^_^
In fact I think it summed up honest forum participation very nicely and uniquely.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:23PM
Ian Jay at 11:05AM, June 7, 2006
(offline)
posts: 720
joined: 1-4-2006
Wow. So it seems we've reached a general consensus on three things:

1) Our internet selves are basically the same as our real-life selves.
2) Only not really.
3) Spang and Oz both have the hots for Schoolmunkee.

As for me, what you're reading on here is how I am in real life, down to the very word, albeit much more thought-out in terms of sentence structure and content. However, in real life I'm pretty inconsistent in social situations– sometimes I can be taciturn, sometimes I can be rude, sometimes I can be irritating (and oh, how I wish those weren't the only three choices)– but here, I'm consistently myself.

This is, I think, because message boards are not like conversations. You don't have to keep up with what everybody's saying– you just scroll back and look. You don't have to yell over everyone else to be heard– everybody's posts have the same priority. You don't even have to stick with the current conversation– you can just go back and quote something somebody said wayyy back at the start of a topic, and roll with it from there (though that's usually considered bad form).

Message boards are good for people who write better than they talk, who need a minute to think about what's coming out of their mouths… people, in short, like me (and probably you, readers). In that regard, messages go straight from our brains to the screen, and we're understood much more easily. Because of that, you could say that for some people, their self-crafted online personas are more appealing and truthful than their real-life ones.

Of course, there are people who talk better than they write, and they usually don't find message boards as appealing as real-life conversation. Those types are more “chat-room/IM” types. And that's a different condition entirely.

~IJ
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:56PM

Forgot Password
©2011 WOWIO, Inc. All Rights Reserved