Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Photoshop Brush Settings
JabberwockyJones at 11:03AM, April 23, 2010
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Hey everyone, I've got a question for anyone who makes their comics in Photoshop.

At the moment, I don't do any work in Photoshop besides panel layouts and speech bubbles, but I'd really like to start actually creating my comics entirely in Photoshop. It'd probably make my comics look a whole lot better on the art side of things. However, I'm having some trouble getting the right brush settings.


Basically, everything that I create in Photoshop comes out looking almost as good as a six year old's painting. My friends have informed me the brushes I'm using are wrong, and that by changing my brush settings I can make the lines look a lot more fluid and less like the shake-y mess it is now. However I don't really know what a good setting for line work would be, and I can't seem to find any examples on the internet.

Can anyone help me out and post their ideal Photoshop Brush Settings? My comic would benefit greatly from your help.

last edited on July 14, 2011 1:05PM
DrBob at 10:09PM, April 24, 2010
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JabberwockyJones
… by changing my brush settings I can make the lines look a lot more fluid and less like the shake-y mess it is now…
Can anyone help me out and post their ideal Photoshop Brush Settings? My comic would benefit greatly from your help.

Two things jump to mind: first of all, are you using a mouse? If you are, then it is REALLY hard to avoid shaky lines. For more fluid lines, you really need a digital tablet.

Second, are you using anti-alias? If you don't have anti-alias on, then your lines are going to have a hard edge that make them look even shakier. Make sure the anti-alias box is checked, which will blur the lines along the edge and make them less shaky than they otherwise would be.

Those are my two main comments, I hope they help. If you are interested in doing a totally digital comic, I highly recommend "The DC Comics Guide to Digitally Drawing Comics" by Freddie E Williams. Despite being a lifetime Marvel fan, I think this book may be the best book ever to explain how to draw digital comics, bar none. It is well worth the $15 bucks.

last edited on July 14, 2011 12:16PM
JabberwockyJones at 10:09AM, April 25, 2010
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Hey thanks for the comment! I was beginning to think this was a stillborn thread.

1) I do have a tablet, but it's only a bamboo and even drawing with it my lines are still bad. I suppose I need more practice.

2) Next time I'm on my regular computer I'll check to make sure that anti-alias is on like you said. I'll look into that book, hopefully it'll help me improve with Photoshop. I've got a bit of saved up money at the moment, so it's probably better to put it down on something like that rather than a new game or the like.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:05PM
DrBob at 10:37AM, April 25, 2010
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JabberwockyJones
Hey thanks for the comment! I was beginning to think this was a stillborn thread.

1) I do have a tablet, but it's only a bamboo and even drawing with it my lines are still bad. I suppose I need more practice.

2) Next time I'm on my regular computer I'll check to make sure that anti-alias is on like you said. I'll look into that book, hopefully it'll help me improve with Photoshop. I've got a bit of saved up money at the moment, so it's probably better to put it down on something like that rather than a new game or the like.
Since you already have a tablet, then yes it will take practice. I've had my Bamboo tablet for about two months now, and it still doesn't feel as natural to me as a pencil. Keep at it.

One other thing that you probably already know but I wanted to be sure you knew; when drawing, be sure to work in a larger resolution and paper size than your final image. That way, shrinking it down helps the drawing look less shaky. Like I said, I'm probably not telling you something don't already know, just wanted to make sure.

Good luck!

last edited on July 14, 2011 12:16PM
mattchee at 10:13PM, April 25, 2010
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I've noticed drawing in photoshop, if you're zoomed out you're more likely to get shakey lines. When I used photoshop to draw my comic, I typically worked at 100% zoom, which, working at print resolution, is pretty tedious.

I now currently work in Manga Studio, which I LOVE for drawing. MS has settings to compensate for the shakeyness that you get in PS. Photoshop is great, but for comics drawing, Manga Studio is my choice. Its pretty inexpensive too– 50 USD for the Debut edition, which is plenty good enough to get some quality comics work done.

I used photoshop for the first three chapters of my last story of Mastorism, Manga Studio Debut for the last three, and then the current story I'm using Manga Studio EX, but honestly 99% of the work I do in EX isn't anything I couldn't already do in Debut.

last edited on July 14, 2011 1:55PM
JabberwockyJones at 12:14PM, April 29, 2010
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Thanks for the tips guys!

I had some spare cash, so I've dropped some money on Manga Studio, and I'm hopefully going to get a few pages done for my next update. I'll have to check chapters for that book still. :P
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:05PM
IndifferentlyEvil at 5:55PM, July 13, 2010
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Hey there, probabaly a little late for a reply, but why not.

I find the main way to stop the shaky lines is to zoom REALLY far in. This doesn't work so well if you are working with a 100% sized original. I usually start double sized then shrink it down at the end to make a final copy.

Hope this helps!
I draw stuff.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:59PM

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