Debate and Discussion

Sterotypes
Pulse at 6:42PM, Jan. 13, 2008
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the thing is wearing dark clothes is like asking people to stereotype you yeah thats an example of our decaying society.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:56PM
deletedbyrequest03 at 8:35PM, Jan. 13, 2008
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Aurora Moon
DancingChaos
As for myself, I have no clue what to label myself as. I wear dark clothes (but not always), jeans, studded belt, chains, and converses. Although, I'm not dark or weepy. I'm mostly apathetic. And I listen to led zepplin.

…Thus, concluding that I fit into a stereotype of my own.


you sound like my boyfriend. He wears the same things, down to the converse sneakers. and he's always conidsered himself punk (not the hardcore kind). It's mainly because he's a heavy metal music lover. Even though he does like other types of bands too.


I actually considered myself punk as well, but I then realized that it's a waste of time, attempting to figure out my stereotype. Your boyfriend knows his stereotype because of his clothes and the music he listens to. What classifies me as a completely different category is the music I listen to: Classical, and sometimes rock.

Beat that, society.

Plus, I choose to wear whatever I want to. I don't have to wear what people think is suitable of a so-called ‘civilized person’.

This year, school's full of BS!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:05PM
Pulse at 4:17AM, Jan. 14, 2008
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Someone
I actually considered myself punk as well, but I then realized that it's a waste of time, attempting to figure out my stereotype
Someone

I can not agree with you more attempting to find your own stereotype is ones of the biggest wastes of time in the world. be who you wanna be, don't let what someone thinks of you shape your life.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:56PM
deletedbyrequest03 at 12:19PM, Jan. 14, 2008
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Pulse
I can not agree with you more attempting to find your own stereotype is ones of the biggest wastes of time in the world. be who you wanna be, don't let what someone thinks of you shape your life.

Exactly.

And someone who wants to shape their life to be a certain stereotype and fails constantly is a poser.

Ah, high school lingo.

This year, school's full of BS!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:05PM
bobhhh at 4:14AM, Jan. 17, 2008
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DancingChaos
Pulse
I can not agree with you more attempting to find your own stereotype is ones of the biggest wastes of time in the world. be who you wanna be, don't let what someone thinks of you shape your life.

Exactly.

And someone who wants to shape their life to be a certain stereotype and fails constantly is a poser.

Ah, high school lingo.

Yes but is it the stereotype that is at fault or the poser? Actually in a way the stereotype is useful here because it has allowed you both to identify a poser. lol!

Streotypes are just a set of characterizations, they allow you to place the subject in a group, if you blindly adhere to these circumstances without further developing your own individuality, that's really your problem, isn't it?

Similarly, if you judge someone without looking past a stereotype, then your incomplete analysis is your doing.

Like I say both above and in the cliche thread, a stereotype is what it it is. It can be used and misused.
My name is Bob and I approved this signature.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:29AM
Lokidoll at 11:04AM, Jan. 24, 2008
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I personally am not a fan of stereotypes in general. I know that stereotypes are there for a reason, and I know that there are people that conform to a stereotype either a) by personal choice or b) by some chance of luck(?) But I am still not happy with it.
As for Goth/Punk/whatever, I don't think being either is so much about the way you dress but more of a life style. Same with being an “Anime Otaku” for example.
Stereotypes I don't think would be so bad if people weren't continuesly throwing them around SOOO loosely.Which seem to also lead to the word “poser” and “faker” and so on.
Over all I am just not a fan of stereotypes…^^;
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:38PM
houseofmuses at 6:51AM, July 20, 2008
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I've found this entire thread very enlightening, and thanks to everyone who contributed. My friend Kat seems to be a cross between the Pirate Goth and the Vampire Goth………
……….but she is terrified of spiders. The slightest creepy-crawly that wiggles her way, she runs off screaming.
*CHUCKLE* Guess SHE'S not exactly one that conforms to stereotype!!!

Lokidoll
I personally am not a fan of stereotypes in general. I know that stereotypes are there for a reason, and I know that there are people that conform to a stereotype either a) by personal choice or b) by some chance of luck(?) But I am still not happy with it.
As for Goth/Punk/whatever, I don't think being either is so much about the way you dress but more of a life style. Same with being an “Anime Otaku” for example.
Stereotypes I don't think would be so bad if people weren't continuesly throwing them around SOOO loosely.Which seem to also lead to the word “poser” and “faker” and so on.
Over all I am just not a fan of stereotypes…^^;
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:50PM
Sea_Cow at 6:54PM, July 23, 2008
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I listen to Avenged Sevenfold. Does that make me any kind of goth?
I am so happy to finally be back home
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:26PM
Amelius at 1:04PM, July 24, 2008
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Sea_Cow
I listen to Avenged Sevenfold. Does that make me any kind of goth?
Nope. Just listening to one band (and no offense but I wouldn't call them goth, but I think proper goth died long ago) does not lend to labeling someone. If that's the case, I'm a mutt, I'll listen to most anything ^_^ “nu-goth” disappoints me on so many levels. I really miss the 80s! If you were listening to The Cure and Sisters of Mercy whilst making your own clothes, maybe you'd fit into the “real” goth culture. Then again, times change and unfortunately NOT for the better sometimes. Some people even think that Emo is something new, when it's been around since the ‘80s too…and it’s a form of post-hardcore punk (emotive hardcore, but even then they didn't like that label) but if you tell people these days they get their undies in a bundle because they're too lazy to do the research. When you tell someone the band Fugazi is pretty much one of the first emo bands, you get rebuttals like “nuuu, this is good music and emo sucks!” When in fact they are incorrect, they like an emo band but don't wanna own up because the misuse of the word has bastardized the meaning. I'm certain if you look up on youtube the “origins of emo” you'll be surprised at what the real stuff sounds like.
For the record, MCR, Greenday and Fallout Boy are not Emo, they're mainstream alternative rock. Early Weezer and Jimmy Eat World are about the closest you'll get to modern mainstream emo. Of course, people that actually know what they're talking about aren't going to convince anyone what the hell emo really is, especially these mislead and self-destructive teens that cut themselves and talk about suicide like it's some wonderful thing; the damage has already been done thanks to people labeling stuff incorrectly. No wonder Ian Mackaye was so bitter over it…
Don't mind my rambling, just a few things in this thread hit my pet-peeve button.




last edited on July 14, 2011 10:52AM
Sea_Cow at 3:08PM, July 24, 2008
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I listen to Avenged Sevenfold. Does that make me any kind of goth?
Nope. Just listening to one band (and no offense but I wouldn't call them goth, but I think proper goth died long ago) does not lend to labeling someone. If that's the case, I'm a mutt, I'll listen to most anything ^_^ “nu-goth” disappoints me on so many levels. I really miss the 80s! If you were listening to The Cure and Sisters of Mercy whilst making your own clothes, maybe you'd fit into the “real” goth culture. Then again, times change and unfortunately NOT for the better sometimes. Some people even think that Emo is something new, when it's been around since the ‘80s too…and it’s a form of post-hardcore punk (emotive hardcore, but even then they didn't like that label) but if you tell people these days they get their undies in a bundle because they're too lazy to do the research. When you tell someone the band Fugazi is pretty much one of the first emo bands, you get rebuttals like “nuuu, this is good music and emo sucks!” When in fact they are incorrect, they like an emo band but don't wanna own up because the misuse of the word has bastardized the meaning. I'm certain if you look up on youtube the “origins of emo” you'll be surprised at what the real stuff sounds like.
For the record, MCR, Greenday and Fallout Boy are not Emo, they're mainstream alternative rock. Early Weezer and Jimmy Eat World are about the closest you'll get to modern mainstream emo. Of course, people that actually know what they're talking about aren't going to convince anyone what the hell emo really is, especially these mislead and self-destructive teens that cut themselves and talk about suicide like it's some wonderful thing; the damage has already been done thanks to people labeling stuff incorrectly. No wonder Ian Mackaye was so bitter over it…
Don't mind my rambling, just a few things in this thread hit my pet-peeve button.







But if they aren't emo, what do we call the self-destructive teens that cut themselves and talk about suicide like it's some wonderful thing? Isn't that the term that was made just for them in the first place? Why do we even make these terms if we keep arguing about where to use them, when…

Wait. Hold on. Let me get some aspirin for my brain.
I am so happy to finally be back home
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:26PM
Amelius at 5:13PM, July 24, 2008
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Nope, it was a term that originated in DC during the post-hardcore phase of punk rock. “Emo” was pretty much synonymous with several bands that were on the Dischord record label. Punk rockers were getting tired of the three chord, violent lyrics gig and decided to write deeper things. Apparently that upset some people who just wanted to get trashed and headbang till their necks snapped.

I think the best term for kids that think suicide is great is “stupid” ^_^

It's just that recently (in the 00's that is) people have been using the term to equate it with A. awful, whiny music (which is unfair to the bands that actually do fit in the category and aren't whiny or awful) and B. Wannagoths and scene kids who wear tight pants and droop their hair in their faces. Emo has always referred to the genre of music that emerged from the 80s, my guess is someone thought it would be smart to call some depressed kid “emo”, and other people started using it too, albeit incorrectly. I think they're just too lazy to make up something creative, I guess!
I'm not just complaining about people calling each other by a name, it's just that it bothers me that they hijacked an existing term and screwed up the meaning. It's not that it's not an appropriate term (they are pretty emotional, or at least faking it) but it's the principle of the matter that it was already a word that meant something else. Now I talk in circles! Alright, a good point though is this kinda stuff always happens in the English language. Words end up with multiple meanings…and I hate that!

And yes, the constant need of people to label things, I'll admit that is headache inducing. But calling someone an emo still seems as silly to me as calling someone a jazz or a hip-hop. It's a type of music, not a pejorative!

And don't worry, I wasn't referring to you over the pet-peeve thing (it mighta looked that way, sorry) just the whole thought of stereotypes in general.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:52AM
Sea_Cow at 5:42PM, July 24, 2008
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Amelius
get trashed and headbang till their necks snapped.

Ha ha… Good times.
I am so happy to finally be back home
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:26PM
Lonnehart at 1:42AM, July 26, 2008
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I still remember the “nerd” type in the 80s. Y'know, the big glasses, the white polo shirt, black pants and shoes, the huge thick glasses, pen protectors and a very bad speech impediment. Of course now you can't tell them apart from normal folks. :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:38PM
Sea_Cow at 12:55PM, July 26, 2008
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Lonnehart
I still remember the “nerd” type in the 80s. Y'know, the big glasses, the white polo shirt, black pants and shoes, the huge thick glasses, pen protectors and a very bad speech impediment. Of course now you can't tell them apart from normal folks. :)

Today, the nerd type is pretty much any asian you see.
I am so happy to finally be back home
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:26PM
bravo1102 at 7:44AM, July 27, 2008
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Sea Cow
But if they aren't emo, what do we call the self-destructive teens that cut themselves and talk about suicide like it's some wonderful thing?

In need of some help and counseling. Teen-age years are a time of depression and anxiety as the teen struggles to define him/her self and oft times that definition can be self-destructive because of negative self image etc. So they are crying out for help. Group think that reinforces self-image can be of help but can also drive them to further destructive behavior as in this case it can reinforce negatives.

I love Goths and emos, they're great to talk to as they're often very intelligent and well-read, just a little muddled. Back in the 80's they existed and at Rutgers we called them “Grossies” after the name of the Mason-Gross School of Arts as most were art students, wearing black, saying “woe is me…”

The more things change the more they stay the same. The more I saw of that culture the more I embraced that saying of Samuel Butler that is my signature.

Though I have to say Goth/Emo/artsy-fartsy grossie culture lends itself quite readily to satire. (broad labels there, but broad brushes work in comedy)

last edited on July 14, 2011 11:33AM
Faliat at 6:12PM, Aug. 1, 2008
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Rivetheads are usually confused with Goths, punks, skinheads or general neo-nazis.

Even in your description of them, it's pretty vague, and you've mislabeled them. They don't even fall under the goth spectrum, interestingly enough. They were out even before the punks, never mind goths. But they get lumped with both since they both stole elements from the L337 people.

Me, I'm not pure Riv. I try to chuck in surfer-style clothing like sandals, beach-style clothes, scruffed up hair and shark-tooth necklaces. But I'm heavily restricted with what I can wear because of my measurements. Most of the less-commercial clothes are made for taller folk. Right now I have a trenchcoat that won't even fit over me when I have my size nine Madfish Haddocks on (Two sizes bigger than my actual size. But that was the smallest they did them in the store). And I have a big head, so when I tried to buy a military-style hat a few months ago I couldn't get the black one because it was too small. So I had to stick with navy and red. Still pretty cool though.

And I can't wear my reflective sunglasses and goggle glasses enough because I'm Myopic… I wear tinted glasses but they're just not the same.

Damn my barely adjustable human form!


Rivets are generally assumed to be mass murderers and crazed loners or due to being lumped with goths, suicidal and depressive.
Weird thing is. I've only ever seen about five people that fit the rivet category. And I just look at them with anger because my mum would never let me walk out the door looking like that or similar. So my style is a lot more watered down than most. And as a result people mistake me for emo.

I just have to blast them some of my music to change their minds.

I don't like Marilyn Manson. Which kinda shocks people when I say it to them when they ask me.
When they ask me what I do like I usually say “Obscure Mexican/German Electronic Junk that usually includes one guy on stage with a keyboard and the other one imitating someone having an epileptic fit”.

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
cartoonprofessor at 5:14PM, Aug. 3, 2008
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I find it very sad that some people feel they need to adopt a ‘look’ to feel secure and/or confident.

My teenage son spends hours with hair straighteners, brand name clothes, etc, to suit the stereotype he wants for that particular day or evening out.

This is totally alien to me (I grew up in the bush where my family and neighbours dressed to suit the conditions, not to fulfill a ‘look’.

Going through my University years I learnt that those trying the hardest to ‘fit in’ by adopting certain stereotypical looks were the one with the least amount of true self-confidence (note: ego is not self-confidence).

For example, my University was in a large ‘country’ town. The students from the state capital often wore moleskin trousers, RM Williams boots, belts, etc, to try and look like they were from the country. The ‘real’ country kids simply wore whatever they had, be it shorts, t-shirts, or whatever.

This trend to look a certain way has always existed, but it used to effect girls far more than boys… now it seems to effect both sexes equally.

It's sad… a result of marketing and a sign of a lack of self-esteem in today's generation.

(Geeze, now I'm sounding old… (sigh))
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:36AM
Aurora Moon at 8:45PM, Aug. 3, 2008
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actually I don't think it has to do with poor self-steem, cartoon proffessor.

Granted, there IS people who wants to fit in with certain groups, and usually will dress the part or act the part.

However…I actually dress this way and I'm not even an teenager. I just happen to like the clothes and the style because it's more fashionable to my own tastes.
and I don't do it to hang out in certain groups… in fact most of my friends aren't even goths/non-mainstream/whatever.

The times are changing alright… and with it comes new fashion for all ages. Even fashion that was once formerly only for the non-mainstream because it was thought to be too different for the fashions of the main public.

I wouldn't be surpised if in a few more years you see more adults wearing those same things more often in public.
I'm on hitatus while I redo one of my webcomics. Be sure to check it out when I'n done! :)
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:10AM
ozoneocean at 9:22PM, Aug. 3, 2008
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cartoonprofessor
This trend to look a certain way has always existed
Yes it has, but for almost everyone, almost all the time. :)

Even when you are “just wearing what you have” you are still doing the same thing, just not as directly. Because all the clothes you wear were all designed to fit into one style or another. Don't believe me? Look at clothes from 100 years ago and contrast them what what people who “just wear what they have” wear. Or even contrast it with what people from other cultures wore at that time for a bigger difference. Go back 200, 300, 400, 500 years to see the changes magnify. If you wear the every day outfit of an Aussie Aboriginal from Tasmania from the 18thC today, you'll stand out quite a lot…

All clothing is about looking a certain way, even when we just pick them out of an untidy pile on the floor at random.
———————————————-

What you're saying though is that some people are more careful than others, depending on class, age, location, education, sex, and other factors. Yep, that's true, but the other thing you're missing is that while some types are more careful about presenting themselves by the way they dress, OTHER types are more careful about not standing out from the majority and will even go so far as to actively punish anyone that does: Your “country” boys aren't always as utopian as you make out.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
cartoonprofessor at 12:38AM, Aug. 4, 2008
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Oh, I'm not trying to make out ‘country boys’ are utopian… on the contrary, most country boys in my experience are very narrow-minded and unforgiving of anyone not percieved as ‘normal’.

My point was that I find it sad that people tend to try and fit in to a certain ‘tribe’ with their clothing… as if this is the only way they can be accepted by others as well as themselves.

This need to be accepted into a certain ‘tribe’ is, I believe, a sign of insecurity, as if one is somehow a lesser person if they do not make the attempt to be a part of one of these tribes.

And, I feel, marketing and branding is largely to blame… “I belong to the Nike tribe” etc.

As mentioned elsewhere… I teach, and see it often… children trying desperately to be accepted by their peers by dressing in certain brandnames.

It is very sad.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:36AM
Aurora Moon at 1:17AM, Aug. 4, 2008
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well, on the bright side you know that most of those children will at least grow out of it just enough to make clothing choices that's actually more to thier budget/tastes/etc.

at least I hope so. I've always felt that money was not everything, much less designer clothes. I don't even shop at hot topic that often or any other popular brand-names for the types of clothes that I like. Now only if more people felt that way more often lol
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last edited on July 14, 2011 11:10AM
ozoneocean at 3:22AM, Aug. 4, 2008
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children trying desperately to be accepted by their peers by dressing in certain brandnames.
Yes, I agree with both you and Aurora here. When a brand name is a substitute for actual taste, that is very, very, very sad.

Even adults are afflicted with that. When I see some poor specimen with a designer name in massive letters on their T-shirt or something like those big ugly DG letters looking crude and tacky on the wings of their sunglasses I wonder why they bother..

As for tribes, well kids have to belong as part of their groups. The drive is painfully strong and probably one of those key things transferred in our genes like the drive for a mate, caring for young, urge to show off and fight ect, but it's bizarre to see a group of kids all different shapes and sizes with minor variations of the same hairstyles, same jeans, and same t-shits all worn in exactly the same way.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:32PM
Sysli at 12:18PM, Aug. 5, 2008
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The fun thing is, people wanting to belong to a group could be an example of the human's basic need to categorize. We categorize everything, sometimes without knowing it, including ourselves. Even people who claim to be different do this. I'd dare say especially people who do that. They very actively attempt not to be like the others and not fit into a “category”, and by doing that they automatically fall into one.
Not that that's a bad thing, really, it's just a complex way of saying “us” and “them”. Heck, I proudly proclaim myself styleless knowing full well that that really isn't that special.

As for the reason why somebody will struggel to fit into a subculture/category/steriotype*/whatever. The explanation I've been given is that when you belong to a group you don't have to define yourself every day. You have guidelines, a sort of safety net… Like expressions. Everybody knows that smiling = happy, we don't have to think about that. But if everybody just made up their own meaning to expressions then nobody could figure out what anybody meant because here was no “rules” like smiling = happy.
So belonging to a group gives security. Like gazelles and other prey animals, safty in numbers. Or hunting packs if you like that better, the group still gives a higher probability of survival. Like ozoneocen said more or less.

*I personally don't like using that word here, because to me it's impossible to be a steriotype. I see steriotypes as the various culture-definitions of a “typical human”, a very flat, seen-from-the-outside perception of whatever group it is you're talking about. like a label. I'm not explaining this very well, but hopefully you all get the point.
Because I may as well show a bit of pride. ^___^

last edited on July 14, 2011 4:06PM
Faliat at 4:22PM, Aug. 5, 2008
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I've been externally wearing men's clothing since I was 14. Originally it was just shirts but two years later I graduated to pants.

Reason? Comfort… That and men's shirts and pants come in better style varieties and show off less skin.

Yeah, they're not built for my shape, but neither are women's clothes. They don't even make proper clothes for kids anymore.
They're all clothes for mini hookers!

Call that jumped up metal rod a knife?
Watch mine go straight through a kevlar table, and if it dunt do the same to a certain gaixan's skull in my immediate vicinity after, I GET A F*****G REFUND! BUKKO, AH?!

- Rekkiy (NerveWire)
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:25PM
RuseBolton at 6:20PM, Sept. 2, 2008
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As for myself i would be in the “Goth” catagory, i do wear black & have my pair of New Rock Boots, but only because thats how i feel comfortable…

Just for the record i would like to say as for a personality trait im an asshole with people skills, people always interest me (Mainly social economics) but as will be demonstrated in the comic on DD all 5 chars involved are personality traits of myself currently or phases that have made me who i am today (& yes they do conflict quite nicely…if thats possible)

I have never been one to steriotype maainly due to the fact that it is my opinion that no body is interesting untill i am shown otherwise & then we may have something to talk about… (Please note, so far DD users all seem to be fine in my books)

But my point is treat life like a forum, genaralise, dont discriminate users/people due to opinion or appearance or you may very well miss something good.

…I think this makes sense…

last edited on July 14, 2011 3:12PM
Sea_Cow at 8:18PM, Sept. 2, 2008
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If I must choose, I'm probably a metalhead, which, along with my frequent use of the interwebs, is the reason for my constant headaches. I listen to Metallica, Rammstein, KoRn, A7X, Ozzy, Guns 'n Roses, Slipknot, Godsmack, System of a Down, and, uh, Pink Floyd. Not everything I listen to is metal, okay? I'm definitely not a skater punk, I never even learned to use a fucking skateboard. I'm always fucking swearing and shit, jesus-fucking christ. So, yeah, metalhead.
I am so happy to finally be back home
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:26PM
Paputsza at 7:29PM, Feb. 10, 2009
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I wear gray. I like to think of myself as a magical dunkers oreo, black on the outside, blue on the inside. The only catagory that I find myself fitting into is as a yaoi fangirl.


The Yaoi Fangirl

People think we're all the same. Fat, ugly, crazy, and otaku. The sort of girl who would rip out your throat.

We are all of these (yes, I spend enough time with yaoi to actually use the term “we”) except for fat and ugly. For Otaku I'm actually surprised we are as skinny as we are. I'm actually underweight by about fifteen pounds.

I don't think we're ugly, especially for otaku. We're usually feminine. We're annoying as a general consensus. It's our overabudent joy from someone in our general vicinity having a yaoiful relationship. I've been said to resemble a chesire cat. The gay guys I know don't even know what yaoi is, unless they told me they were straight or they were in anime club.

We travel on a different wavelength than the rest of the world. Once the yaoi moment ends our tragic life is brought back to the forefront. Yeah, a wavelength.

There are several types of yaoi fangirl


Fandom based:

anti-fandom fangirl - (by far largest percentage) writes and reads original fiction or makes original webcomics.

fandom fangirl - writes fanfiction and doujinshi. Still only reads the original fiction

Sensuality based:

do you in the butt fangirl- will marry a guy and steal his cherry

asexual fangirl- “eeewwww, naught bits.” Either because anything so 3d freaks them out, they think all the little brothers should be a natural flurescent blue. That or they're too young.

lesbian yaoi fangirl - I'm not sure how this exists, but somehow it's oddly common.


If you see one run, I know I will. Since the research that's put into creating manly characters is painstaking and violent. I just downloaded the anarchist cookbook for research on how to make the next chapter of my story.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:38PM
Senshuu at 7:12PM, Feb. 11, 2009
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Stereotypes. They're true to a degree, which is why they exist. But they're far from universal and should not be the standards against which we judge people.

That said, I fit into almost every common/jokeish Black stereotype (esp. concerning foods), which is funny, because most Black people don't even associate with me very well, either. Nor most of my extended family. %D

I never labeled myself or any of my peers because we're all too unique. I could never look at anyone that plainly. No one followed cliques or tried to fit in; I certainly didn't care. We did our own thing. It's nice. That's the kind of thing you can do here in a country like this. Be your own person damnit!

I can't call myself a “yaoi fangirl” (or any " fangirl“ since there are very few things I like THAT MUCH, and the actual self-labeled fangirls are far crazier than I am), but I guess that would be the thing I'm closest to, considering my knowledge of the subject. :B I don't know what people think of when they hear those words, but there's a lot of unwarranted cringing while everyone else probably fits into some ”group“ that another ”group" would find absolutely painful to even conceive of.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:27PM
Backstaber at 9:41PM, Feb. 11, 2009
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posts: 54
joined: 11-19-2008
Anyone have Junior ROTC at their High School? I was in it at mine and everything thought I was some Nazi and wanted to kill people. (totally untrue) XD

Ahh, the stereotypes of the military.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:15AM
Hakoshen at 8:01AM, Feb. 13, 2009
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posts: 2,090
joined: 11-23-2008
On the subject of stereotypes, this is obligatory post from the black community. That is all.

Backstaber
Anyone have Junior ROTC at their High School? I was in it at mine and everything thought I was some Nazi and wanted to kill people. (totally untrue) XD

Ahh, the stereotypes of the military.

I was in JROTC, but no one ever thought anyone was a Nazi. Maybe because there's a military base twenty minutes from the school, and half the students are military dependent.
God needed the Devil, the Beatles needed the Rolling Stones, Hakoshen needs me.
I'm the enemy he requires to define him.
Soon or later, he'll bring me back to life again for another epic encounter of shouting about power levels and grimacing.
-Harkovast
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:40PM

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