General Discussion

The Britsh Are At It Again!
Product Placement at 2:15PM, June 26, 2010
(online)
posts: 7,078
joined: 10-18-2007
lba
I dunno what Americans you're talking to. The version of cocktail sauce I'm familiar with is ketchup, mayo and horseradish. Pretty much identical to what you've described.
The American cocktail sauce that I'm used to doesn't have mayo. It's only ketchup and horseradish.

Also, discovered this:
Dr Wikipedia
Cocktail sauce in its simplest form is ketchup mixed with prepared horseradish, though in Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Iceland, France and Belgium, mayonnaise is usually mixed with the ketchup, similar to fry sauce. Furthermore, in Belgium, a dash of whisky is often added to the sauce, and in Iceland, sour cream is considered essential. It is popularly served with steamed shrimp and seafood on the half shell. Many restaurants use chili sauce in place of ketchup. In Australia, it is often provided in fish and chip shops.

In most American oyster bars, cocktail sauce is the standard accompaniment for raw oysters and patrons at an oyster bar expect to be able to mix their own. The standard ingredients (in roughly decreasing proportion) are ketchup, horseradish, hot sauce (Tabasco, Louisiana, or Crystal), Worcestershire sauce, and lemon juice. A soufflé cup is usually set in the middle of the platter of oysters along with a cocktail fork and a lemon slice. Often, the bottles of ketchup and other sauces are grouped together in stations every couple of feet along the counter, but in more sophisticated oyster bars, patrons are served with their own ingredients.
It's more common than I realized. I thought it was only in the states and here.
Those were my two cents.
If you have any other questions, please deposit a quarter.
This space for rent.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:52PM
Frostflowers at 5:51AM, July 11, 2010
(online)
posts: 689
joined: 10-8-2006
Swedish condiments, huh…? I want to say räksallad or skagenröra, but really, the most Swedish of condiments and sandwich-spreads is definitely, without a doubt, Kalles kaviar.

We've got HP-sauce, we've got ketchup and mayonnaise, but Kalles kaviar is found in nearly all Swedish homes at some point or the other.

I despise it with a passion.
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
Niccea at 7:59AM, July 11, 2010
(online)
posts: 5,513
joined: 8-10-2007
I'm going to have to second the barbecue sauce. We smother our meat in Sweet Baby Ray's.

My dad once made his own barbecue sauce once. It was pretty much ketchup, mustard, and some honey.

Ketchup is really my smothering thing. Especially if the thing I'm eating doesn't have enough flavor.

As far as salads, I like jalapeno ranch dressing.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:14PM
altprom at 8:27AM, July 11, 2010
(offline)
posts: 30
joined: 9-21-2008
I guess you could call it a condiment, but I use a thing called I Can't Believe It's Not Butter spray butter.
It is very strange, but I grew up on the stuff.

…I'm pretty sure it's all just chemicals. Who else has heard of this stuff?
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:49AM
Niccea at 8:29AM, July 11, 2010
(online)
posts: 5,513
joined: 8-10-2007
I use the knock off called Butter It's Not.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:14PM
Salsa at 8:51AM, July 11, 2010
(offline)
posts: 2,384
joined: 7-10-2008
Well, I guess I'll add one more to the SE USA pile.

BBQ sauce normally goes on BBQ sandwiches, and just to clarify, it's not the sauce that makes it BBQ, it's how it's cooked (low and slow baby!). Yes Sweet Baby Ray's will show up every now and again in my Nana's house, but my Momma, it's Kraft original. Then it's ketchup on fries, mayo in potato salad, and honey mustard on chicken tenders (fried tenderloins). That's for my family. Me personally, I'll try just about any combination. Vinegar, ranch, and hot sauce (why do the dining halls use Texas Pete instead of Crystal, I'll never know) on fries. It's better than it sounds. Homemade Thousand island recipe, 1 part ketchup, 1 part mayo, 1/2 part relish or sweet cubes.
RAGE!
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:18PM
seventy2 at 8:57AM, July 11, 2010
(online)
posts: 3,953
joined: 11-15-2007
I use a lot. it all depends.

I throw hot sauce on pizza, i use ranch with my spicy buffalo wings, ketchup with burgers and associated foods. BBQ sauce on anything that goes on the grill. (that isn't hamburger or hotdogs). and only a dab of mustard, sometimes.

anything else is gross.
facara
Running Anew an exercise blog.
I'm gonna love you till the money comes, half of it's gonna be mine someday.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:30PM
altprom at 10:27AM, July 11, 2010
(offline)
posts: 30
joined: 9-21-2008
Another thing I always think about for ranch is in middle school there were those lunch trays with the different sections, and some people would fill one of the sections completely with ranch. It was disgusting.

I use bbq sauce when needed. Like on a pulled pork sandwich, mmm.
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:49AM
Castle Pokemetroid at 10:54AM, July 11, 2010
(online)
posts: 115
joined: 6-25-2010
I eat any kind of meat with rice that has soy sauce in it. It's really good with chicken stew.

My house is a bit strange. My dad eats like an American, but my mom eats like a Thai. My dad puts BBQ sauce on just about anything, while my mom puts soy in anything she cooks.

To my family, rice is a must. It's to the point where we use it much more often than salt and pepper. My mom says she eats the ‘rice’ way.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:37AM
Vakanai at 6:22PM, Aug. 7, 2010
(online)
posts: 460
joined: 11-20-2007
I don't know about countries of origin or anything of the like, but if we're talking sauces here's my list, from the usual to bizarre:
Ranch goes on salads, pizzas, chicken tenders/nuggets, hot wings. Occasionally hot dogs when I'm feeling to lazy or to rushed to get a spoon and use mayo like a normal person.
Mayo goes on hot dogs, burgers, and all types of sandwiches.
Ketchup goes on burgers, fries, and hot dogs. Sometimes in scrambled eggs.
Soy sauce goes on anything Asian or Asian-inspired.
Taco sauce/salsa goes on those corn chips things, tacos, burritos, pretty much anything Mexican.
Sour cream goes on Mexican food, and in that beef and potatoes thing that I can name but probably can not spell, ‘stroganoff’.
BBQ sauce on BBQ stuff.
Steak sauce on steaks.
I personally never use hot sauce nor mustard. Hate the stuff. Usually.
That's the basics. Then there's the crazy crap I do when I've run out of salsa or taco sauce but have already nuked a few frozen burritos. Keep in mind, this is done in the spirit of ‘better than having them plain’ out of options…uh, spirit…thing. Nuked burritos are just bland enough to require some kind of condiment combination. Always.
Soy sauce mixed with sour cream.
Olive juice mixed with ranch (I don't know why, but for some reason I call this combination ‘Greek styled’ ).
Steak sauce mixed with either ranch or sour cream (but not both, ranch and sour cream together seems weird even for me). Sometimes replace steak sauce (when it's not available) with either Worcester (sp?) sauce, BBQ sauce, or some kind of pseudo-steak sauce-like seasoning sauce.

Despite all this, my favorite ‘add on’ isn't a sauce of any kind. It's simple crushed black pepper. I'm actually applying a lot less sauces and condiments on my food, and just adding black pepper instead. There are exceptions. Sandwiches, burgers, and hot dogs still require mayo, but less to no ketchup, and a heavy sprinkling of pepper. And the nuked burritos still get some sauce combination. Seemingly all cooked foods are better with pepper. I almost never add salt, just pepper.
Black pepper is the spice of choice.
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:39PM
Randal at 4:47PM, Aug. 14, 2010
(online)
posts: 374
joined: 1-4-2006
Frostflowers
Swedish condiments, huh…? I want to say räksallad or skagenröra, but really, the most Swedish of condiments and sandwich-spreads is definitely, without a doubt, Kalles kaviar.

We've got HP-sauce, we've got ketchup and mayonnaise, but Kalles kaviar is found in nearly all Swedish homes at some point or the other.

I despise it with a passion.

That just sounds gross. “Mmmmm, ground up fish egg paste… mmmmm”

Mettaur
Condiments? Easy one, I'm jewish, all jewish people when eating a bagel must have some smoked lox on it. And I mean MUST, it's delicious!

I never think of meat as a condiment, but I suppose it could be.

As for some other condiments mentioned…

I never put mayo on anything, probably because I've smelled mayo that's gone south of fresh before. I hate ketchup on hot dogs, however a slice of tomato or diced tomatoes give a nice flavor without the harsh/sweet mix of vinegar and sugar that are in ketchup. I'll put mustard and onions on most anything.

One thing I used to do when I was a kid was to dip my fries (“chips” for you Brit and Aussie wankers =]) in my milkshake if I had both at the same time. This used to gross my parents (and most everyone else) out, but if you think about it, people put dairy on their potatoes all the time… cheese, ranch, sour cream, etc…

I'm also a fan of Taco Bell hot and fire sauce. I'll save them up and use them on items that come from other eateries.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:01PM
Ironscarf at 5:05PM, Aug. 14, 2010
(online)
posts: 1,048
joined: 9-9-2008
Since this thread is still breathing (who knew people cared so much about their condiments?) here's another British institution, from Jamaica.

It says it's hot and by gad, it is hot!

As sure as I believe there's a heaven above, Ozone,
I know there's something much more,
Something even non-believers can believe in.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:02PM
ImaginaryGirl at 12:13AM, Aug. 20, 2010
(offline)
posts: 72
joined: 4-14-2010
Interesting fact: Salsa recently overtook ketchup here in the US in terms of popularity. I'm still more of a ketchup girl, though. Salsa, ketchup, mayo, and mustard are the standards by and large. Of those, I only really like the tomato based one. However, you can replace mayo with ranch dressing in most cases and have it turn out amazing. I'm also partial to a good vinegrette.

Lately though it's been peanut butter and honey sandwiches, since they don't take a lot of preparation.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:57PM
skoolmunkee at 3:10AM, Aug. 20, 2010
(online)
posts: 7,058
joined: 1-2-2006
I'm more of a salsa person myself. It's nice to make up a batch and have it fresh in the fridge for whatever. It goes nice with almost everything.

I decided to stop eating peanut butter when I found out how many calories are in it, there's more nutritional value in the same amount of other sandwich fillings. Although occasionally I will let myself have some spread really thinly on crackers with apple slices. :]


I had a craving for buffalo wing sauce like restaurants have a while back, and when I found the recipes I was horrified. Apparently restaurant style buffalo sauce is equal parts hot sauce and butter (and perhaps some dashes of other stuff like vinegar). No wonder I got so fat in my early college years.
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:43PM
Randal at 12:07PM, Aug. 22, 2010
(online)
posts: 374
joined: 1-4-2006
skoolmunkee
I'm more of a salsa person myself. It's nice to make up a batch and have it fresh in the fridge for whatever. It goes nice with almost everything.

I decided to stop eating peanut butter when I found out how many calories are in it, there's more nutritional value in the same amount of other sandwich fillings. Although occasionally I will let myself have some spread really thinly on crackers with apple slices. :]


I had a craving for buffalo wing sauce like restaurants have a while back, and when I found the recipes I was horrified. Apparently restaurant style buffalo sauce is equal parts hot sauce and butter (and perhaps some dashes of other stuff like vinegar). No wonder I got so fat in my early college years.

They make peanut butter without added sugar, perhaps the caloric levels in it wouldn't be as alarming as the other stuff.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:01PM
Product Placement at 7:50AM, Aug. 23, 2010
(online)
posts: 7,078
joined: 10-18-2007
This thread still going on?

All right, I have something else to contribute. I kinda remember this one thing, which I think is originally from France, called Remolad.



It's this chunky yellow sauce thing that people put in roast beef sandwiches and is really popular on hot dogs around here. The standard of “one with everything” for a hot dog, would be ketchup, mustard, remolad and fried and raw onion. So now you know what to expect, when you order that package where I live.
Those were my two cents.
If you have any other questions, please deposit a quarter.
This space for rent.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:53PM
ozoneocean at 8:00AM, Aug. 23, 2010
(online)
posts: 24,789
joined: 1-2-2006
Product Placement
It's this chunky yellow sauce thing that people put in roast beef sandwiches and is really popular on hot dogs around here. The standard of “one with everything” for a hot dog, would be ketchup, mustard, remolad and fried and raw onion. So now you know what to expect, when you order that package where I live.
Send one here.
Now!
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:36PM
Product Placement at 7:32PM, Aug. 23, 2010
(online)
posts: 7,078
joined: 10-18-2007
ozoneocean
Product Placement
It's this chunky yellow sauce thing that people put in roast beef sandwiches and is really popular on hot dogs around here. The standard of “one with everything” for a hot dog, would be ketchup, mustard, remolad and fried and raw onion. So now you know what to expect, when you order that package where I live.
Send one here.
Now!
I'll seriously do it, if you cover the shipping fee. ;)
Those were my two cents.
If you have any other questions, please deposit a quarter.
This space for rent.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:53PM
ayesinback at 4:30PM, Aug. 24, 2010
(online)
posts: 2,003
joined: 8-23-2010
ImaginaryGirl
Lately though it's been peanut butter and honey sandwiches, since they don't take a lot of preparation.

I've loved peanut butter and honey sandwiches for a LONG time—and everyone raises an eyebrow (which is not easy) when I say honey and not jelly. Good to know there's someone else.

And has anyone else tried hotdogs with
under new management
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:14AM
ozoneocean at 8:52PM, Aug. 24, 2010
(online)
posts: 24,789
joined: 1-2-2006
Product Placement
I'll seriously do it, if you cover the shipping fee. ;)
I'd rather ship myself there and eat one on site :)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:36PM
ksteak at 10:05PM, Aug. 24, 2010
(online)
posts: 101
joined: 3-27-2009
Randal
One thing I used to do when I was a kid was to dip my fries (“chips” for you Brit and Aussie wankers =]) in my milkshake if I had both at the same time.

My older brother used to do that, dip his french fries at maccas into his chocolate thickshake. He had weird taste buds.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:24PM
Product Placement at 10:27AM, Aug. 25, 2010
(online)
posts: 7,078
joined: 10-18-2007
ozoneocean
Product Placement
I'll seriously do it, if you cover the shipping fee. ;)
I'd rather ship myself there and eat one on site :)
That would work out even better for you. I bet the dog would have gone cold and the bun soggy from the sauce by the time it would get over to you.
Those were my two cents.
If you have any other questions, please deposit a quarter.
This space for rent.
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:53PM
skoolmunkee at 1:02PM, Aug. 25, 2010
(online)
posts: 7,058
joined: 1-2-2006
ksteak
My older brother used to do that, dip his french fries at maccas into his chocolate thickshake. He had weird taste buds.

Surely everyone's had fries 'n frosty
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:43PM

Forgot Password
©2011 WOWIO, Inc. All Rights Reserved