Debate and Discussion

What the f uck is with these temp jobs?!?
kyupol at 4:20PM, Nov. 20, 2006
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Why are there so many temporary jobs out there? What's with all these jobs in the job bank being ripoff temporary positions with weird shift hours? Cmon. Like a forklift operator for $9 per hour (3-5 years exp)… a welder for $11.50 per hour (not entry level. 3-5 years exp)… and some IT professional position that asks for tons of certifications (mcse, a+ unix, cisco, java, c++, and 10 other certifications I cannot remember) and 3-5 years experience… only for $30,000 a year?!?


Yeah I know you'd tell me there is such a thing as a “hidden job market” where 50-80% of the jobs are. You'd tell me the best way is to hunt for potential employers and apply to them… etc… etc… etc…


Why the hell are these companies exploiting people by making them temp? Temp meaning no benefits and shit salary. Contract gets renewed every 6 months or so. But come on… imagine working for a company for 5 years and still not getting any benefits. :(


The government should impose heavy taxes on companies that do temp jobs. It will only encourage exploitation and drive down the wages and standard of living. Then chain reaction… increase in poverty and homelessness.

One time just for kicks I called in a homeless shelter pretending to be someone who is under threat to be on the streets. You know… with a little drama to the speech you will sound believable enough. :) Anyway, a snippet of the conversation:

Me: I hope I wont have to be homeless.
Her: I hope so too. There's more and more people becoming homeless these days. I hope the government does something too…



I know this whole thing is a complex issue. But is this also connected to the large number of “boomeranged” young adults? Since the wages arent gonna be enough to support their standard of living they enjoy living with the parents?


NOW UPDATING!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:25PM
skoolmunkee at 10:52PM, Nov. 20, 2006
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Well, historically jobs that deal with physical labor pay more than sit-down-and-type jobs. I don't think that's anything new. I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that tradesmans and labor jobs are heavily unionized. They are able to fight for what they've got. Have you ever heard of an IT Professional's Union?

Basically though, companies try to get away with paying the lowest they can with the fewest benefits because they can. Most local governments are very pro-business and anti-union. If a company is looking for a state to build a new plant in, there are always a few states who will fall all over themselves to get that business because the state can make money off environmental taxes, etc… not to mention the incoming employees will be buying houses, groceries, movies, etc. The way these states entice the companies is by selling how non-unionized they are, their poor standard wages, and sometimes just GIVE the companies money (in the form of free land, free roads, tax breaks, etc) to come to their state. It seems insane to me, but for state economics it must work, or something.

Most white-collar industries don't have unions. In right to work states (more every year) you can be fired for any damn thing, and especially if you even think about a union. I think the largest white-collar unions around are teacher's unions, and you see how effective those are because teachers are SO highly paid and get so many benefits… (sarcasm there). (Then again they are trying to get money from the state, who most of the time simply doesn't have money for education.)

Companies hire temps because they're cheaper, fire people near retirement because it's cheaper, don't give benefits because it's cheaper, do everything because it's cheaper. Businesses are easy to deal with - they're all about the money, so everything they do, they do because it will make them money (or keep them from losing money). States won't make laws regulating businesses because then they'd lose the business. Especially in this day and age of NAFTA, etc, where someone can send work to Mexico or India.

The only things that seem to change are when the whole country can focus on a single company and force them to change- like Nike sweatshops in 3rd world countries, or Wal-Mart benefits. Those are still isolated cases though and no other businesses follow the examples that those big companies are forced to set because no one is making them. :(
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:39PM
kyupol at 6:50PM, Nov. 21, 2006
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Companies hire temps because they're cheaper, fire people near retirement because it's cheaper, don't give benefits because it's cheaper, do everything because it's cheaper. Businesses are easy to deal with - they're all about the money, so everything they do, they do because it will make them money (or keep them from losing money). States won't make laws regulating businesses because then they'd lose the business. Especially in this day and age of NAFTA, etc, where someone can send work to Mexico or India.

From a business standpoint… isnt that less productivity? If you have to hire someone every 6 months. They are gonna be slow at first and you have to train them again and again.

Lets say you have a good employee whos been on contract for 2 years already and isnt permanent yet. If some other company offers him a bigger salary he's gone the next day. Your talent is gonna be transferred to your competitor.



NOW UPDATING!!!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:25PM
skoolmunkee at 3:05AM, Nov. 22, 2006
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Many temp jobs are low-talent. Office work, etc isn't usually very demanding, and don't take long to teach. I expect that a business would gladly suffer a month of low productivity (because they can always make other employees take up the slack) rather than pay more in wages. The jobs that don't require college degrees, in most cases, are the ones that go up as temp jobs. The ones that do require college degrees and are temp jobs, are there because there's such an over-abundance of people in that field that they will take any work they can get, like coders etc. The market allows them to get away with that, so they do. You aren't going to find a temp nuclear physicist job or anything. In all the temp places I've seen, they are only looking for office work, people who can speak another language, or manual labor.

In your case, they would lose the talent, but it wouldn't be hard to get back. If someone has been a temp for 2 years it's because the business hasn't had a reason to make them permanent yet. That would be a case where the person gets another offer, then they work between the two companies to figure out who will give them the most. If the original company won't give them a contract, benefits, etc… they don't really care about you or want you, you (and replacing you) is cheaper than keeping you. Goodbye! Those businesses that keep people on temp forever are basically happy to let people circle around in a holding pattern until they have to change. They count on the fact that the person isn't going to find a better offer (or even looking), isn't going to want to leave, etc.

There's never just one temp. Say a company has 200 employees and 10 of them are temps. If those temps had contract wages and benefits, the company would be paying out (let's pretend) another $5000 a year, each. That's $50,000 for 10 temps. That's a lot of money saved.
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:39PM
ozoneocean at 3:57AM, Nov. 22, 2006
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Next up from temp work is short contract work, I've done a lot of that in graphic design. Consultants also do a lot of work like that. The pay is a LOT higher than an hourly wage, but once the job's over, you're gone…

I did temp a few times as a graphic designer though, and that cost the company I was working for a lot more than they'd pay for a normal employee. The reason being, they got me through a temp agency, I set my own hourly rate (that was reasonably high), and the temp agency added a bit on top of that for their own fee, (they didn't dip into my money). The company had no choice though, they had lost their designer and needed someone good to get through a whole heap of work in a hurry- no time to fill the vacancy. They even offered me a place… But I didn't want it :P

Skool's assessment is mostly right, but there are exceptions, as with my case: There are companies out there that will pay highly for specialist temps.

I also agree with Kyupol's suggestion that companies who overly exploit a temporary work force should be penalised because it is a cause of social harm. I call that antisocial corporate behaviour!
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:24PM
Aussie_kid at 4:55AM, Nov. 22, 2006
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I know what you're talking about.

My dad does all this IT work for a mining company that refuses to hire him full time, even though it'd save a lot of hassle for every one. He has work for 2-4 months, then a few weeks later, they call him saying they got more work for him. It usually turns out it was stuff he could have done if he had been employed longer than the time he was given. Also, he has been told he works harder than most of the full time workers.

I don't see why they don't just sack one of the full timers and give my dad the permanent job. It'd save a lot of time.

Also, a little while ago he found out they need some filing work done. About two days work. He asked his supervisor if I could do it, seeing as I was unemployed and could have used the cash, plus they needed the work done. The big boss was asked, he refused, the work was never done and they're probably further behind than they need to be.

Well, some people just suck
Insanity Complex: We may not be insane, but we like to think we are
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:11AM
Kristen Gudsnuk at 3:28PM, Nov. 30, 2006
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temp jobs are pretty good. For students, who have a full schedule of classes to attend/basically no certifications (like ME for instance!) temp jobs can be SWEET!instead of getting the $7 minimum wage, I get $11-$13 an hour! For stapling, for calling primary care providers, for knowing a little bit of Microsoft Access.
It's great if you have spring or winter or summer break, and you have a full-time, well-paid (by my standards) office job that'll end whenever you need it to. Temps can gain useful work experience, and make valuable corporate connections.
Also, for people with only a high school diploma/GED, there isn't really a bustling world of occupational opportunities waiting at their doorstep. Often, options are limited to: waiting tables, working in retail, bartender, McDonald's, or temping. The only jobs I've had (other than mural painting and being a “nanny” ) were temp jobs, and some of the people I worked with had no other options available. Single mothers, immigrants, a lot of people who would be in deep shit without the (admittedly sporadic) temping paycheck.
So! I say: TEMPING IS GOOD
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:22PM

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