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Your fav books EVER
Exzachly at 9:16PM, July 24, 2007
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fern
skoolmunkee
fern - I dunno anything about that book so I'm gonna recommend The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay because that's the first thing I thought of when I saw that title (also it's an awesome book).

I don't usually read books… that's one of the things I hate about myself. Sparknotes is my savior but I'll try check it out.

: )

I actually intensely disliked that book. It won the nobel prize for fiction that year though i think.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:24PM
joe_vee at 10:54PM, July 24, 2007
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ALL MUST READ:

A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius

One Flew Over The Cockoo's Nest

Fight Club

And much more, there are so many good books out there. Feel free me to PQ me for requests :P.


~ You Are What You Love, Not What Loves You ~
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:10PM
joe_vee at 10:56PM, July 24, 2007
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oops spelled cuckoo wrong ><
~ You Are What You Love, Not What Loves You ~
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:10PM
ifelldownthestairs at 9:03AM, Nov. 25, 2007
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of mice and men by john steinback was my first favorite… then the old man and the sea by ernest hemingway. then this side of paradise by f. scott fitzgerald. then slaughterhouse five by kurt vonnegut.

then american psycho by bret easton ellis. looking back, that's kind of a funny progression.

HYSTERICAL.
you know why birds don't write their memoirs? because birds don't lead epic lives, that's why. who'd want to read what a bird does? nobody. that's who.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:56PM
DAJB at 2:09AM, Nov. 26, 2007
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This is one of those threads where you just know you're going to think of a whole lot more as soon as you've hit the “Send” button!

Okay - off the top of my head:

Catch 22 - perfect blend of innovative structure, story with depth and meaning and black-as-pitch humour.

The Lord of the Rings - can't help it. Read it as a kid and I've been hooked ever since. Never have non-human characters seemed so … human.

To Kill A Mockingbird - didn't read this until well into adulthood. Expected to be moved and made to think (which I was) but didn't expect to be laughing out loud (which I did!)

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - read it again quite recently. Douglas Adams's The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy owes so much to this book!

Pride and Prejudice - one of those books you avoid as long as possible because you just know it's going to be “girly”. And then you read it and get tricked into liking it by the sharp wit and biting satire.

1984 - Dystopian future at its most bleak. Forget all those post-apocalyptic wastelands … this is far more scary.

I'm sure there's more but … well, real life calls!
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:03PM
Ikos at 7:31AM, Nov. 26, 2007
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Some of my favourites are:

The Wheel of Time books by Robert Jordan

A hitch-hikers guide to the galaxy books

The Redemption of Althalus


Not the absolute best books ever, they just astonish me every time I read them again.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:57PM
trevoramueller at 1:13PM, Nov. 26, 2007
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Orson Scott Card - Ender's Game

I also dig the Tim Zhan Star Wars books

Mostly I've been reading comics, lately….
My Drunk Duck Comics:


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last edited on July 14, 2011 4:33PM
Dave7 at 9:29PM, Nov. 26, 2007
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The call of Cthulhu by H.P. Lovecraft

1984 by George Orwell

Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson

Nemesis by Isaac Asimov

The Darwin Awards by Wendy Northcutt
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last edited on July 14, 2011 12:09PM
Frostflowers at 6:27AM, Nov. 27, 2007
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Alice in Wonderland/Through the Lookinglass by Lewis Carrol. I've got this old blue, leatherbound copy, and I've read it so much that the spine is cracking.

A Song of Ice and Fire by George RR Martin (the entire series, so far). Brutal fantasy the way it should be written.

Deadhouse Gates, Memories of Ice and House of Chains by Steven Erikson, from his Malazan Book of the Fallen cycle.

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson.

Other than those, my favourites change every day; I read like a rabid thing, and go through books like other people change their clothes. My to-be-read list is much, much too long, and it grows every day.
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
marine at 9:45AM, Nov. 27, 2007
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Just some off the top of my head, stuff I liked and would reccomend:

The Metamorphosis -
Starship Troopers -
Fear & Loathing In Last Vegas -
American Psycho -
Of Mice & Men -
Fight Club -
Catch 22 -
A Clockwork Orange -
I Am Legend -
The Watchmen -

I like a lot of schlocky pulp stuff too. Not so much for the “romance” ones, but the stuff more like Tom Clancy or Mickey Spillane. I own a lot of reference books, true crime stuff, history books, and of course comic books. I also have read some horror novels, Clive Barker & Stephen King being the two stand outs for me. I would like to pick up books and start reading again, but eh. Something seems very effeminate about reading.

last edited on July 14, 2011 1:53PM
Frostflowers at 10:16AM, Nov. 27, 2007
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marine
Something seems very effeminate about reading.
…. What?

Dictionary.com
ef·fem·i·nate
1.(of a man or boy) having traits, tastes, habits, etc., traditionally considered feminine, as softness or delicacy.
2.characterized by excessive softness, delicacy, self-indulgence, etc.: effeminate luxury.

English not being my first language, I find myself having to ask; what, precisely, is “effeminate” about reading? I'm not looking to get into an e-fight about anything - I'm honestly curious. o.O
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
TheMidge28 at 10:18AM, Nov. 27, 2007
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I am very particular when it comes to reading.
It has to capture my imagination.
I am not one for the classics.
The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger…beautiful and romantic…Hey I'm a softy.
House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski…probably the most ambitious, genius and creative book of the 21st century…IMO of course.
The Dark Elf Trilogy by R.A. Salvatore…EASY READ but immensely satisfying.
and finally the stories of H.P. Lovecraft.


last edited on July 14, 2011 4:22PM
skoolmunkee at 5:43PM, Nov. 27, 2007
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Frostflowers
English not being my first language, I find myself having to ask; what, precisely, is “effeminate” about reading? I'm not looking to get into an e-fight about anything - I'm honestly curious. o.O

Well given a choice between braving the arctic to kill polar bears bare-handed and staying in bed reading a book, reading is pretty girly.
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:40PM
Frostflowers at 2:02AM, Nov. 28, 2007
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skoolmunkee
Frostflowers
English not being my first language, I find myself having to ask; what, precisely, is “effeminate” about reading? I'm not looking to get into an e-fight about anything - I'm honestly curious. o.O

Well given a choice between braving the arctic to kill polar bears bare-handed and staying in bed reading a book, reading is pretty girly.
I suppose, if you put it that way. Does marine do a lot of bare-handed polar-bear-killing, though?
The Continued Misadventures of Bonebird - a poor bird's quest for the ever-elusive and delicious apples.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:31PM
Steely Gaze at 12:24PM, Nov. 28, 2007
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My favorites books, in no particular order:

Magician by Raymond E. Feist. My favorite fantasy novel; just a really addictive read for me from start to finish.

Mort by Terry Pratchett. I love the world Pratchett created with the Colour of Magic, but Mort has always been my favorite out of his Discworld series.

War Against the Mafia by Don Pendleton. I can't honestly believe I'm putting this one on the list, but it's the one book that truly changed my life. After reading this, I really kicked up my reading habits a lot. Most people find pulp fiction disposable, but I have a giant respect for it now, after reading this one.

The Crystal Shard by R. A. Salvatore. It's D&D, which means it's as light a fantasy novel as you can find, but I can't help but be enthralled by Salvatore's characters and his engaging adventures. Though his later books aren't as fun, I still have fond memories of the Icewind Dale trilogy.

And there are my favorites, at least I think I got them all. I read an average of thirty or forty new books a year when I can, and I'm always finding great new ones. And the first person to call me effeminate will get one loud belly-laugh in response.
A Roll of the Dice now with full-size pages!

John Clyde now with ten times the tacky Hawaiian shirts!
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:57PM
Rickswan at 9:22PM, Feb. 22, 2009
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Ohh man, Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson is by far my favorite, but Childhood's End comes in a pretty close second. Check them out damn it! The main character is named Hiro Protagonist for f•••'s sake.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:07PM
ozoneocean at 2:05AM, Feb. 23, 2009
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Skool and I traded book reccomends a little whole ago.

-Her's: The story of your life and others, by Ted Chiang. (SciFi short stories)
Those were good short stories. You could very much tell that they were started as intellectual concepts, ideas, notions… and were later expanded upon and examined in the form or a story. They worked nicely. Very smart. :)

-Mine: Bikini Planet by David Garnett. (SciFi comedy novel)
I's the middle part of a collected series of three, but it's the best one of the bunch and works well without the other two. I found the pace nicely brisk, with Douglas Adams type humour but without his preachiness. A good, fun read, never as bawdy as the titled implies, and often quite silly, but interesting non-the-less.

————————–
Tuff voyaging By George R. R. Martin.
That's a great one. It's a bunch of short stories all about the one strange fellow called “Tuff”, and all the problems he overcomes for different human colonies on various planets, all with the help of his gigantic biological war battleship.
-I found it surprisingly clever and fun. The stories are very much in the style the things you'd get in SciFi pulp magazines in years gone by… Which I think is where most of them started.

Wuthering Hieghts.
I wasn't stuck with that book in school like a lot of people were. I just picked it up and red it out of enjoyment, and I loved it. It was a very readable look into the dark, troublesome lives on the moors of those made up 19thC people. Very wild, windy, gothic, and romantic. The ending was a bit drawn out but there were some great moments.

The Dragon and the George by Gordon R Dickson.
-This is another that started like as a pulp short story once upon a time, before it was later turned into a novel, then a series of novels… But it's early history shows through, it has the wonderful invention, fun, and wackiness of a lot of those old pulp stories, as well as being a great fun fantasy story in its own right!

Drinking Sapphire Wine/don't Bite the Sun
, by Tanith Lee.
This is a lovely little examination of the vapidity of youth culture and the vapidity and dangers of a culture that's become obsessed by youth, beauty, fads, the meaninglessness of the NEW.
Set in a future where all needs are taken care of and people stay at the level of teenagers permanently… And yet the world is so dreamlike and full of possibility it's such a wonderful place to visit. :)
——————-

PG Wodehouse is a fave author… but everything I've ever read by him I love so I have faves. All his books are faves. :)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM
lastcall at 4:07AM, Feb. 23, 2009
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Paul Kidd's Greyhawk trilogy

Richelle Mead's Georgina Kincaid series

Tate Hallaway's Garnet Lacey series

last edited on July 14, 2011 1:28PM
timethief at 11:45AM, Feb. 23, 2009
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In no particular order:

Starship Troopers, by Robert Heinlein
Dune (all of them) by Frank Herbert. I'm currently starting with the Kevin J Anderson prequels.
The Discworld series, but especially Mort and Sourcery. By Terry Pratchett.
Conan by Robert E. Howard.
A princess of Mars, by Edgar Rice Burroughs
I am Legend, by Richard Matheson
Ring World, by Larry Niven
And The Adventures of Captain Alatriste (I guess you won't find it in English, but I had to mention it, it's definitely one of my favorites)
last edited on July 14, 2011 4:30PM
NickGuy at 12:10PM, Feb. 23, 2009
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Lord of The Flies
The Odyssey-epic poem format
The Giver
Ender's Game series-Mostly Speaker for the dead and Xenocide…pretty much anything by orson Scott card
Watership Down-fucking brutal
Game of Shadows
Baseball: A Literary Anthology-The best writing about america's game
A Day No Pigs would die
Roots
Black Boy


more to come when I can actually look at my bookshelf.

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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:15PM
Eddie Jensen at 4:46PM, Feb. 23, 2009
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I've only ever read through 2 entire books so I guess you could call those my favorite They be The hobbit which I read in 4th grade and a ukraine book (that I read in norwegian ofcourse) called “Cooler Than Jesus” which I do recommend. I also have listened to some Audio books but they were mostly of norwegian books by Erlend Loe and another one called Mannen som Elsket Yngve (the Man that loved Yngve) Also very good.
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last edited on July 14, 2011 12:18PM
mlai at 9:52PM, Feb. 23, 2009
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Looks like the Ender's Game novel series is the next set of sci-fi epic that I must read, since I'm done with the entire Dune series.

I've come to love stories where the characters are larger-than-life Napoleons and Machiavellis. You just can't get that kind of complex layered intrigue conveyed thru movies/TV. The closest that has come from a screen, was Square's Final Fantasy Tactics, for me.

Since Dune, I've read a couple of historical series with that kind of depth… but not sci-fi. Ender's Game it is!

FIGHT current chapter: Filling In The Gaps
FIGHT_2 current chapter: Light Years of Gold
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:06PM
ozoneocean at 12:01AM, Feb. 24, 2009
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Ender's game is a mixed bag… He wrote the books in that series over a very long period and they change in style quite a lot, they also change in meaning and intent. By “Ender's Shadow” he's basically re-written the whole meaning of the first one. It's a bit lame.

Not like the Dragon and the George series by Dickson where he wrote those novels over an even longer period, but even with something like 20 years between the first and the second, it's amazingly consistent.
—-

Don't get me wrong, Orson's Ender's books aren't bad, and growing, changing, and evolving is great in an author, but it's very transparent here:
-Ender's game is very much directed at teenagers. It's a great story, but you can see it has that level of understanding in mind. I first read it in highschool and loved it, then read it a few years ago and still liked it but the limitations were more apparent. Better as a stand alone book)

-Speaker for the dead is VERY different in style. This isn't a compelling action story like Ender's game, it's really a whole different story, just coincidently with 2 of the same characters and sort of a similar universe. It's a far more adult, introspective, thoughtful story.- My fave of the bunch BTW and better as a stand alone book.

-Xenocide, ostensibly a direct sequel to Speaker for the Dead. It's AMAZINGLY weak. And suddenly you have all these silly metaphysical aspects added into the story which weren't there in the earlier books. By this time Card has tried to take the idea in yet ANOTHER new direction, but in such a ham-fisted way. It wouldn't have been so bad if it wasn't supposed to be connected to the other two stories (for the concepts introduced), but this one could not stand alone, and even with the others for support it fails.

-Ender's shadow… (I think it's called that). This is the last one in the series that I read or will ever read. In this story Card goes BACK again to the original ideas in Ender's game, with the younger focus and all, trying to recapture the magic… But being as this is Orson Scott Card here, he has to change the theme and the story yet again. Ender's shadow attempts to change the tone and re-write the story of the original novel with a darker, grittier feel. Unfortunately it's not only not as good a story as the original, the changed focus and different perspective serves to cheapen Ender's Game.

——–
So my recommendation would be to read Ender's Game, then give it a few months and a few novels in between before reading Speaker for the Dead. -That way your mental palette is cleansed and ready for the new and quite different treat. :)
Ignore the other books.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM
Custard Trout at 12:40AM, Feb. 24, 2009
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The Inheritance Trilogy and Twilight. They make such good kindling.
Hey buddy, you should be a Russian Cosmonaut, and here's why.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:01PM
Koshou at 2:29PM, Feb. 24, 2009
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Lord of the Flies
Ender's Game
Varjak Paw (still looking for that damn sequel. I can't find it anywhere! …does anyone even know about this book?! Because it's awesome.)

basically anything that's creepy in some way. Doesn't matter what kind of creepy, just creepy. Bonus points if it's supposed to be a “kids book”. I love me some mindfuckery.

I still need to read 1984. :C

also, the Redwall series. Mice with swords? I'm game! My favorite was Taggerung because the main character was an otter for once. Otters are cool. I never liked the books about the badgers, though.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:21PM
NickGuy at 4:03PM, Feb. 24, 2009
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ozoneocean
Ender's game is a mixed bag… He wrote the books in that series over a very long period and they change in style quite a lot, they also change in meaning and intent. By “Ender's Shadow” he's basically re-written the whole meaning of the first one. It's a bit lame.

Not like the Dragon and the George series by Dickson where he wrote those novels over an even longer period, but even with something like 20 years between the first and the second, it's amazingly consistent.
—-

Don't get me wrong, Orson's Ender's books aren't bad, and growing, changing, and evolving is great in an author, but it's very transparent here:
-Ender's game is very much directed at teenagers. It's a great story, but you can see it has that level of understanding in mind. I first read it in highschool and loved it, then read it a few years ago and still liked it but the limitations were more apparent. Better as a stand alone book)

-Speaker for the dead is VERY different in style. This isn't a compelling action story like Ender's game, it's really a whole different story, just coincidently with 2 of the same characters and sort of a similar universe. It's a far more adult, introspective, thoughtful story.- My fave of the bunch BTW and better as a stand alone book.

-Xenocide, ostensibly a direct sequel to Speaker for the Dead. It's AMAZINGLY weak. And suddenly you have all these silly metaphysical aspects added into the story which weren't there in the earlier books. By this time Card has tried to take the idea in yet ANOTHER new direction, but in such a ham-fisted way. It wouldn't have been so bad if it wasn't supposed to be connected to the other two stories (for the concepts introduced), but this one could not stand alone, and even with the others for support it fails.

-Ender's shadow… (I think it's called that). This is the last one in the series that I read or will ever read. In this story Card goes BACK again to the original ideas in Ender's game, with the younger focus and all, trying to recapture the magic… But being as this is Orson Scott Card here, he has to change the theme and the story yet again. Ender's shadow attempts to change the tone and re-write the story of the original novel with a darker, grittier feel. Unfortunately it's not only not as good a story as the original, the changed focus and different perspective serves to cheapen Ender's Game.

——–
So my recommendation would be to read Ender's Game, then give it a few months and a few novels in between before reading Speaker for the Dead. -That way your mental palette is cleansed and ready for the new and quite different treat. :)
Ignore the other books.

I disagree with you about xenocide…if you read speaker for the dead and then xenocide, theres alot of continuity between those…I mean, he was on a completely new planet, so of course thered be a new direction. I would wait between enders game and speaker for the dead, and then read speaker and xenocide back to back.

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last edited on July 14, 2011 2:15PM
ozoneocean at 7:24PM, Feb. 24, 2009
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Xenocide carries on from Speaker, but it's unnecessary and weakens the story as a whole- if looked on as a part of the tale in Speaker. Speaker is a very clever, contained little story, it really IS a nicely constructed piece, and all the action and themes are limited to the characters within it and their own little planet. It just leaves off with a bit of a cliffhanger at the end…

Which didn't have to be resolved in a new book, and it's not anyway, but it is expanded really uselessly regardless. The nicely contained, well designed world from Speaker, with its intelligently limited scope gets broadened WILDLY in Xenocide with a really poor sub-theme about genetically “gifted” children on another planet the tired old cliche about “preventing the destruction of the world!!!”. And at the very last moment in this novel that has already gone a little strange, all of a sudden Card drops in magical metaphysics with people creating other people and amazing spacecraft out of thin air…

Now if he'd have written that as a stand alone, and not as part of the Ender series, he could have made it work. He's a great writer so I'm SURE he could have, but as it was, it was just bunged on there. It really felt like most of the story came from something he was writing as part of another one of his series. The publisher probably wanted another Ender book and he didn't have any ideas, so he simply adapted one of his other projects to fit. It wouldn't be the first or the last time an author did that. :)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:33PM
Drasnus at 12:51PM, Feb. 25, 2009
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Anything by Chuck Palahniuk.


See also: I Am Legend.
See also: American Psycho.
See also: HHGTTG.

Masterpiece isn't the right word but it's the first word that comes to mind.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:16PM
Aurora Borealis at 5:51PM, Feb. 27, 2009
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Ok, best fantasy cycle I have ever read (and I read it at least three times as often as LOTR) is…

Memory, Sorrow and Thorn by Tad Williams, consisting out of three thick novels: The Dragonbone Chair, Stone of Farewell and To Green Angel Tower (the last one had to be split in half due to it being about 1500 pages long).

now I have to go think up more books to put in here.
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:08AM
DRose at 6:11PM, Feb. 27, 2009
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My personal favorites:


Misery by Stephen King I love almost everything that I've read by Stephen King, and this is one of my favorites. So rarely is a character as horrifying as the villian in that book.

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman While I love everything I've ever read by Neil Gaiman. This was the first book that I ever read by him. Its what made me a fan of his work so it takes top spot over his other works.

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson Disturbing characters. Its not that anything in particular happens in her works but Shirley Jackson created some of the msot demented and dangerous women I've ever read about. I wish I had more of her stuff but a lot of it is out of print.

Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris I've only enjoyed two books by Thomas Harris: “Silence of the Lambs” and “Black Sunday” but they are both excellent books and Lambs has Hannibal Lecter so it takes the lead.

Remember Me by Christopher Pike In junior high I read dozens of Christopher Pike's teenage horror novels: Chain Letter/Last Vampire/etc. Remember Me was the best.

Sorry this list came out a little longer than I intended.
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:17PM

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