Ye Olde Edgar Allan Poo Forum

Mythology For Kids?
edgarallanpoo at 1:52PM, March 29, 2007
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Yeah, we barely touched on mythology in school. It's funny because I remember seeing “Aesop's Fables” on the Bullwinkle cartoon. That was the closest contact I had with mythology–which is a stretch to associate the two, I know. But… Greeks have some of the richest ideology the world has ever seen, in my humble opinion.

So, the real “first contact” I had with mythology was in the pages of Marvel's “Thor.” I found the mythology amazing and it sparked an interest that I acted upon several years later.

It wasn't until I reached high school that I really started investigating various cultures' mythologies. Immediately I found rich books filled with mythology of the bold Greeks and intrepid Romans. Bulfinch's introduced me to Norse mythology as well. Wow… I was blown away by Norse mythology.

Okay, I said all that to ask this:

Do you think it is appropriate to introduce young readers to mythology? Is there any value in introducing readers to mythos at a young age?
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last edited on July 18, 2011 10:27AM
Hellstorm at 8:56PM, March 30, 2007
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If not when they're young, then when? As people get older, and more caught up in the ‘rational world’, if they haven't already developed a taste for fantasy, I doubt they ever will.
last edited on July 18, 2011 10:27AM
Inidas at 5:46AM, March 31, 2007
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Oh hell yes! I mean, what kind of a question is that? I read some of the “mythology for kids” books when I was in elementary/middle school, and loved the stories. I don't remember many of the names, but when i see a reference I usually look it up and say “oh yeah, I remember that.” By the way, what's the name of the guy in Hades whose punishment is to always be hungry, and to have a bunch of grapes always out of arms length?
last edited on July 18, 2011 10:27AM
edgarallanpoo at 5:58AM, March 31, 2007
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Hellstorm
If not when they're young, then when? As people get older, and more caught up in the ‘rational world’, if they haven't already developed a taste for fantasy, I doubt they ever will.


Welcome to the forum, my friend! I'm happy to see you here. :)
Oh, I totally agree. It's been said in some circles that mythology holds no value to children, but, as you said, I definitely agree that it is during their formative years that you can instill a love for fantasy into their little heads and hearts.
So, yeah… thanks for commenting, brother. :)
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last edited on July 18, 2011 10:27AM
edgarallanpoo at 6:03AM, March 31, 2007
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Inidas
Oh hell yes! I mean, what kind of a question is that? I read some of the “mythology for kids” books when I was in elementary/middle school, and loved the stories. I don't remember many of the names, but when i see a reference I usually look it up and say “oh yeah, I remember that.” By the way, what's the name of the guy in Hades whose punishment is to always be hungry, and to have a bunch of grapes always out of arms length?

As I told Hellstorm, the reasoning for not including mythology in childrens' studies is a rather obtuse one. At a young age, childrens' minds are more malleable. It is during this formative time that we can instill a love of the fantastical. It seems to me that schools really don't stress imagination anymore. It's all about “making the grades.” Sure, academics are extremely important in our society, but so is imagination! Imagine how sad our society would be if we did not have anyone who could see beyond the physical and create imaginary worlds for our exploration.
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last edited on July 18, 2011 10:27AM
Hellstorm at 7:20AM, March 31, 2007
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Inidas
Oh hell yes! I mean, what kind of a question is that? I read some of the “mythology for kids” books when I was in elementary/middle school, and loved the stories. I don't remember many of the names, but when i see a reference I usually look it up and say “oh yeah, I remember that.” By the way, what's the name of the guy in Hades whose punishment is to always be hungry, and to have a bunch of grapes always out of arms length?

Tantalus, which is where our word ‘tantalize’ comes from.

For a quickie recap, go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tantalus#Story_of_Tantalus

I imagine he wasn't far from Sisyphus, who was forced to roll a boulder uphill for eternity. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisyphus

I don't know what this has to do with being a ‘sissy’, but I'll look into it.

Don't even get me started about how Lucifer ( ‘light-bringer’ or ‘light-bearer’ ) has more to do with Prometheus bringing light (and hence, enlightenment) to man and being punished for eternity for it, than anything ‘evil’. That's a New Testament change in character that in comics would be referred to as a retcon.




last edited on July 18, 2011 10:27AM
edgarallanpoo at 7:27AM, March 31, 2007
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Thanks for answering Inidas' questions, brother.
I'm afraid I looked right over them. :(
But fear not… I've had my coffee and I am now prepared to battle dragons. :lol:
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last edited on July 18, 2011 10:27AM

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