Comic Talk, Tips and Tricks

Non-traditional comics?
skoolmunkee at 9:35AM, Aug. 1, 2011
(online)
posts: 7,058
joined: 1-2-2006
Just a quackcast idea I've been thinking about for a little while. I started out thinking of them as “experimental” comics, and then you end up with things like MPSA or Hobo Lobo… which are cool but maybe beyond many people's abilities. So then it became more a question of comics done not in the way you normally expect to see comics. Which covers things (some unusual) like:
 

toy/clay/prop photo comics
human people photo comics
collages (more abstract? I dunno)
choose-your-own-adventure type comics

 
And then there's a whole other possible category which is doing comics with really… not “inappropriate” software, but not things you'd expect. I'm not so sure about these and I can't really think of any examples… I dunno, have there been PowerPoint comics or anything? It seems like there might be something you could do with those if you thought about it a bit, because a program like that is good at doing certain things. It just seems like you don't necessarily need to be restricted to graphic arts programs to create a webcomic type thing.
 
Is this even interesting? I kind of think so, but I can't really explain it… sure I could talk about some of those ones from the list but I'm not sure what there might be to say other than “yup some people do comics that aren't drawn or follow a linear story.” Any ideas? Just trying to start some conversation here. :]
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
Amelius at 2:48PM, Aug. 1, 2011
(online)
posts: 246
joined: 1-15-2006
I find it interesting! :)
I do quite enjoy comics that use alternative media. I had even planned to make a pipecleaner comic , made a whole cast and everytihng. The problem was our digital camera really wasn't up to the task of photographing small furry things, and our lighting was terrible. Despite that Nick assembled 2 experimental comics, which were cute but someone who actually did a photo comic gave us a little advice on fonts. I've got lots of fonts and Nick was having fun with them, but apparently you want something more subdued for a photo comic since there's not much you can do in the way of representing movement in the frames, so a stiffer font fits better. We stilll want to do something with the concept eventually though. Right now the characters are just sitting in a craft drawer waiting for their time :C
I also did do a Power Point comic on commission for the company Nick used to work for, I'm not sure if I can reveal much beyond that, but it was themed after Home Improvement's Tool Time show. It was really cheesy! I'm not sure if I've seen any other Power Point comics, but I did see an animation made with the program somewhere. It could be an interesting idea in fact. Someone could make good use of scrolls and dissolves!
(Nick informs me that people present their comics like this at cons and hasn't seen many online since you'd have to download the document first)
ep1 at 5:10PM, Aug. 1, 2011
(online)
posts: 19
joined: 5-11-2009
I've seen ASCII comics but usually from Japanese websites. I've even seen comics made of office cliparts. There was one that create drawings using his coded vector software. And let's not forget the oekaki comics too. Origami comics… I have seen it somewhere but I can't recall. Comics about the owners' pets are basically photos of their pets with speech bubbles. I have see some Chinese artists did a paper doll comic.

Non traditional comics also includes concepts that are not commonly used. Take mine for example. I used philosophy and a bit of humor included in a religious kind of comic. (insert shameless plug) ;p I have yet to see others pulling the same stunt.

VegaX at 1:23AM, Aug. 2, 2011
(offline)
posts: 617
joined: 4-28-2006
I like the concept and idea of non-traditional comics more than i like the result, because they always turn out as inferior and of much less quality than a regular comic. I'm not saying it can't be done but the onces i've seen just wasn't very fun to read or look at.

When you start doing photo comics with people for example it demands that you're somewhat skilled in acting/facial expressions and have costumes and enough settings to make it interesting. Making a photo comic in your living room or back yard just isn't very captivating. Same goes with action figure comics where you really need to be skilled in using camera angles and interesting sets to make it work visually.

last edited on Aug. 2, 2011 1:24AM
theorah at 4:45AM, Aug. 3, 2011
(online)
posts: 78
joined: 7-19-2006
Its a great subject to talk about! :D
In terms of discussing it, I guess you can highlight some significant experimental comics to those who havent heard of them (and maybe reccomend scott Mcloud to those who want to persue experimental comics?), or highlight some of the DD comics that have used experimental medium (Like one of my faves ‘The Optimist’, do you remember that one? :D).
Good and bad points to me with experimental comics:
-A great way to make use of a very adaptable medium (I mean illustration story telling).
-You can give greater emphasis on things like pacing, emotion, themes behind stories when you use more unusual formats or medium.
-Experimental comics are often so focused on the experimental side of things, that the story can be lacking :(
- Sometimes using off the wall/abstract ways to tell a story are not effective in TELLING a story. Although thought provoking or exciting, it can be hard to create the same engaging characters and scenes depicted in more inematic/straightforward comics. I'd like to try make a happy medium with my comics ^_^
I've seen some great experimentals over time though, and done my own. Unfortunately I have very rarely come across one that has that ‘happy medum’. Most are very stylised and interesting, but lack a story of substance :S My favourite is a small press comic I bought a few years ago, it was a ‘comic’ exploring dreams, and had lots of little fold outs and pockets containing smaller illustrations on cards.
I dont have much online of my experimental stuff, but I've done the greek story of Orpheus and Eurudice in the form of a greek pot (with the comic around the side). You basically read the comic first and then cut it out/turned it into a box. I also dabble in Toy Theatre, which I consider to be a form of sequential illustration. I've also done ‘sequential’ figurines (like clay models telling a story?) Recently I did a comic that mixed illumination (calligrapghy, like in medieval manuscripts) with sequential art. I also hand illuminated each cover of that one :)
And the only thing I have online is this ‘comic’ I did years ago:
http://naoru.deviantart.com/art/Define-artist-77439337?q=in%3Ascraps%20sort%3Atime%20gallery%3Anaoru&qo=33
Done on some CDs, so basically you can look at them individually or put them together. I was 16 and have no idea why I chose CDs now 0_o
Nowadays I try to use a happy medium. As in when I come up with my stories, if they require more simple/ordinary storytelling, then thats what I'll give them, and if they might require something a bit more off the wall, then I'll add it in ^^
theorah at 4:52AM, Aug. 3, 2011
(online)
posts: 78
joined: 7-19-2006
also, reading about the ideas and things other people have talked about, I can assume that everyone's idea of a ‘experimental comic’ is probably different! *_*
I'm quite broad with the term ‘comic’. To me if something uses images or art to tell a story then its a comic, doesnt even have to be in sequence. I know however alot of people wouldn't define this as ‘comic’- another thing to discuss? :D
bravo1102 at 3:56AM, Aug. 5, 2011
(online)
posts: 3,224
joined: 1-21-2008
The only thing I've learned about doing a non-traditional comic is how little most readers and especially other artists regard non-traditional comics and the people who do them.
As I have said before doing a photocomic you're starting with two strikes against you and a toothpick instead of a bat.
If you put in facial expressions no one will notice because facial expressions in comics are notoriously exaggerated. If you add them like they are on real people because you're using real faces only rarely will anyone notice in comic sized panels.  There's also the fact that many have spent a lifetime learning to ignore facial expression and how they appear on real faces.  Most people appear stone faced most of the time except for the eyes.  You rarely if ever see the inside of someone's mouth unless they're yelling. 
 
So with photorealism do I go with subtle real expressions or exaggerated comic ones?
And you're damned if you do or damned if you don't.  If you go exaggerated you'll be accused of being purposely silly or inappropriate in the expressions and if none or subtle realism? Every one is stone faced and you are accused of not putting in any expression.
I could write more but I'm distracted by skoolmonkee's dancing avatar.  STOP DANCING YOU EVIL BOXING MONKEY!
skoolmunkee at 1:18AM, Aug. 6, 2011
(online)
posts: 7,058
joined: 1-2-2006
theorah wrote:
also, reading about the ideas and things other people have talked about, I can assume that everyone's idea of a ‘experimental comic’ is probably different! *_*
I'm quite broad with the term ‘comic’. To me if something uses images or art to tell a story then its a comic, doesnt even have to be in sequence. I know however alot of people wouldn't define this as ‘comic’- another thing to discuss? :D
Go ahead, keep giving me good reasons for wanting you on the Quackcast and then denying meeeeeeee
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
ayesinback at 2:36PM, Aug. 15, 2011
(online)
posts: 2,003
joined: 8-23-2010
This is a great idea!  I'm curious about what most people expect when they hear a term liketraditional comic.    A traditional traditional comic would be in print, right?  Once it goes digital, is it the application that would make it non-traditional, or the content?

I can't remember the comic, but it was here on DD and it was photos of a collage of felt pieces.  I loved it and can't remember why I didn't fave it – I think I had read all the few pages there were to it.

Usually I refer to my comic in quotation marks (and that's not the one I describe as a scrapbook) because it seems outside the range of typical.  

I love the topic:  what's traditional?  what's typical?
under new management
bravo1102 at 3:53AM, Aug. 23, 2011
(online)
posts: 3,224
joined: 1-21-2008
ayesinback wrote:
I love the topic:  what's traditional?  what's typical?
And all snarkiness aside what is it like to be a nontraditional comic creator and is there anyting differnet in the creative process of the non-traditional comic creator.

Forgot Password
©2011 WOWIO, Inc. All Rights Reserved