General Discussion

Rant, moan, rave and share - for all your chatter, natter, ETCETERA! 2013
kawaiidaigakusei at 6:06PM, Dec. 12, 2013
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ayesinback wrote:
If I had time, motivation, even talent, I'd like to do a comic entitled Reality Blurs. It would be auto-biographical, bravo would show up every so often. Most of you would, popping out of Hippie's van like drunk ducks from a clown mobile. Why – that could be the next radio play! Not an omnibus. A Drunk Duck Clown Bus!
Can you start the Reality Blurs comic on The Duck, like, right now? It would be this fun collaboration comic for drunk ducker's to cosplay as each other's comic characters for kicks and giggles. We could take magic trips to other countries via HippieVan's bus (a la The Magic School Bus) and watch Of Monsters and Men perform in Iceland; visit the Phallological Museum in Husavik; and visit other Drunk Ducks all around the world! (Of course, the A-Rated, Robin Thicke-esque version of the comic, Reality Blurred Lines, would end up racking up massive page likes and end up in the top 20 on the site.)
PS–knitting: you are making an entire sweater? That is a feat! I have been working on my scarf and am currently on my sixth day, a whole sweater would take me over one month.

@gullas
I cannot get enough of those snippy puns!

@bravo1102
TREAT YOURSELF. You are the tank man, so you need to have a Grille Ausf.M model in your collection.

@ozoneocean
On clothes-Sometimes I find myself on Amazon online shopping for articles of clothing that would assemble this perfect “uniform” I could wear on a daily basis. Only, I tend to buy a minimum of 3-5 quantities of the exact same article of clothing.
On hussar uniforms-TREAT YOURSELF! You deserve it!
On Quackcast pic-DO IT! I have the original images and can generate a beard if/when you decide to grow yours back.

@HippieVan
On guys-I guess the mind is fascinated with “what could have been” and meeting a perfect stranger and having no contact is more intriguing than meeting a not-so-perfect stranger at a bar who chain smokes a pack of American Spirit in one sitting and buys two pitchers of beer for himself (RED FLAG). College guys were tricky…most of the ones in my department liked the same type of men I did. Still, there is always facebook and you might have a mutual friend with the guy in question.
last edited on Dec. 12, 2013 8:14PM
Lonnehart at 7:29PM, Dec. 12, 2013
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Apparently one of the constant nightmares I've had over the years is now coming true…  Want to live off the land while generating your own power, water, and food?  Well…
http://offgridsurvival.com/livingoffthegridcrime/
http://offgridsurvival.com/survivalgardenseizedanddestroyed/

So now if you're not connected to the power grid and don't have piping for the water/sewer services and are growing your own food, the local government in the area can get you arrested and/or kicked off your land.  You still own the land.  You just can't live on it unless you're connected to the city services.  So now living “green” (using non polluting sources of power/water, etc) is becoming illegal.  Even funnier is that when the head of this “project” was questioned he remained silent.  That raises a HUGE red flag for me.

Now I have no idea if those articles are true or not,  but if they are it's a very scary thing to me.

Oh, well…
last edited on Dec. 12, 2013 7:30PM
ozoneocean at 8:56PM, Dec. 12, 2013
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Lonne- I would take those stories with a massive amount of grains of salt. :)
The people doing that site are already anti-government so their perspective is skewed hugely. For al we know the woman had contravened the law or was planting on land owned by someone else, or selling her medicines commercially.
With the other example the man could have been dumping his own sewage waste into the water table… Proper removal of waste water is taken extremely seriously by government agencies because the risks are serious.
 
As to the woman's “Medicinal” plants, that's such a joke man. Unless she has advanced pharmacological knowledge and is also trained in biology and chemistry she does not stand any hope at all of producing useful medicine from her plants.
Traditional cures were pretty ineffective when that was all they had in the past, but they were better than nothing. Medical technology has moved on vastly now- we know what doesn't work and we've isolated the stuff that does, made sure it's safe, determined how exactly it does work, and provide it in dosages where it works best etc.
 
With her plants, she was likely just being a fool like so many before her. There are very few truly REAL and useful medicines you can make easily from plants without lab equipment and the knowledge to use it.
 
————
 
Kawaii- Ah, uniforms, that reminds me of an aspect of my job!
As a kid I would always do things like design the ideal uniforms for my “army”… what badges the officers would have etc.
As part of my work now I sort of do that for real, but for miners rather than soldiers! Ha! Mining companies are very paramilitary in their uniform and organisation, it's interesting. They have caps embroidered with which mine and affiliated company they work on, jackets and shirts with the same thing, with notations saying how long they've worked with no accidents, patches showing which sort of machinery they work with… And much more.
 
——————-
 
And that brings me to something else I've thought for a while- in design there's this mythical maxim “FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION”, but it's always misused and has become almost a complete myth… Even when it was first proposed, people treat it as:
“Form should look like the concept of function”
It's basically a pure excuse for another typoe of decorative design. You make something odd looking and awkward, or minimal and spare, and use the “form Function” mantra as justification.
 
But that doesn't mean the maxim is meaningless just because it's so abused- A lot of military and architecture  tech has a certain beauty to it and I realised that in that case form often really does follow function- so there is a beauty in that you cen see how every part relates to each other part in a logical, useful way and creates the whole- it's a sort of mechanistic determinism.
 
HippieVan at 9:18PM, Dec. 12, 2013
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kawaiidaigakusei wrote:
Of course, the A-Rated, Robin Thicke-esque version of the comic, Reality Blurred Lines, would end up racking up massive page likes and end up in the top 20 on the site.
 
Ahahahahah!
 
This comic idea reminds me of back in the Top Drawer days (for those who don't know, it was an anything-goes part of the forum that got shut down for obvious reasons) we had a comic called Top Drawer High starring DDers.
 
I think my character should be kind of like a dalek. Like I've got this lovely magical hippie van exterior, but one day you guys look under the hood and AAARRGGHH!
 

 

 
Oh man, I'm having one of those times when I wish I could quote more than one thing without my post going completely bonkers. I've seen you do it, ozone - what's the trick?
 
@ozone: I don't know much about design, but that's a great point about military/architectural stuff!
 
@ayesinback: I am also amazed by your knitting skills! As I've said before, I very rarely have the patience to finish a whole scarf.
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kawaiidaigakusei at 9:38PM, Dec. 12, 2013
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Lonnehart wrote:
RE: Article - “Medicinal Herbs”
I was waiting for someone else to reply before I chimed in on this one.

The article did not mention exactly which herbs she was planting in her garden. Chances are, she could have had a species of medical cannabis for her “bad back problems” or “glaucoma”.

The difference between Eastern and Western medicine is that Western medicine relies on chemical compounds (such as the ones Ozone listed above). If she was using Eastern remedies and plants in her garden, she could have risked an ecological disaster by introducing an invasive species into Tulsa, OK, which would have been put the eco-system at risk. Some urban cities forbid people from planting directly in the regular ground soil because the ground water has been known to carry toxins in the water.

The definition of “living off the grid” used here is known as “squatting” in other parts of the world.
Lonnehart at 10:55PM, Dec. 12, 2013
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kawaiidaigakusei wrote:
Lonnehart wrote:
RE: Article - “Medicinal Herbs”  
I was waiting for someone else to reply before I chimed in on this one.
 

The article did not mention exactly which herbs she was planting in her garden. Chances are, she could have had a species of medical cannabis for her “bad back problems” or “glaucoma”.

The difference between Eastern and Western medicine is that Western medicine relies on chemical compounds (such as the ones Ozone listed above). If she was using Eastern remedies and plants in her garden, she could have risked an ecological disaster by introducing an invasive species into Tulsa, OK, which would have been put the eco-system at risk. Some urban cities forbid people from planting directly in the regular ground soil because the ground water has been known to carry toxins in the water.

The definition of “living off the grid” used here is known as “squatting” in other parts of the world.

True enough.  The article doesn't mention what plants were being grown, so the government there could've had a good reason for tearing that garden out.

As for the people living off the grid, they're hardly squatters.  They did mention having bought the land and living there for years without any problems.  But now new ordinances have apparently been passed requiring that they have power and water on their property or else they can't live there.  The way I'm seeing it, the law there is now requiring them to pay for public services they don't want, and they're either jailed or forced off their property until they comply.

Assuming those things are actually happening, of course…

Now for something else.   Like getting my house defenses organized and running.  There's no way that old fat guy in his reindeer driven sleigh is going to sneak into my house to put another lump of coal into my stocking this year.  >:(
The only thing that would offend me more is if he left the deed to a coal mine in my stocking.  Grrr….. >:(
last edited on Dec. 12, 2013 11:08PM
kawaiidaigakusei at 11:54PM, Dec. 12, 2013
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HippeVan wrote:
Oh man, I'm having one of those times when I wish I could quote more than one thing without my post going completely bonkers.
I completely disregard the regular editing box, I type everything out in a separate word processing program fully fleshed out with all the bb-code tags, then copy/paste into the forum edit box. The text gets all wonky when I try to edit the post directly in the box, so in order to edit, I go to the original file, edit, then copy/paste.

Haha! That Dalek is funny. It reminds me of Krang from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

ozoneocean wrote:
“FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION”
Exciting topic!
The term was popularized around the 1950s when the mid-century modern movement took place as a way to move away from the traditional revival styles of Europe and create a look of clean simplicity because it was the “future” of design. I was stunned to see how much Frank Lloyd Wright catered to his client after visiting his Hollyhock House. The house had narrow stairways and door frames that were built shorter than the average human scale that I found myself ducking to walk through them and find that they opened up into much larger rooms with high ceilings. It was like walking though the house in Alice in Wonderland–to a foreign individual, the form of his architecture goes against function, but to the owner, the scale was perfect.

Not to throw down Louis Sullivan's idea that “Form Follows Function”, but perhaps boring form follows function. Palm Springs, Caliornia, became a hub for the Modern Design movement with its geometric white pillars, monochromatic-white color scheme, and large glass panels. Show me the most plain and boring skyline in the world, throw a Frank Gehry building in front of it (where form rarely follows function inside and out), and it will become one of the most dynamic, gorgeous cityscapes ever created.

This relates to my Mondrian versus Kandinsky argument–the first is geometric and minimal, while the second trancends the grid and becomes unique–both use primary colors in varying ways, but, irregardless, both are considered art.

*In industrial design, an object is reassessed, reinvented, refined, redesigned and reintroduced (rinse, wash, repeat) until it has evolved into its most optimal form.
bravo1102 at 6:44AM, Dec. 13, 2013
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ayesinback wrote:
But what am I doing?! Let's not start talking about DDRP 2014 without a full obeisance to the DDRP 2013. Was it the anticipation, or was it The Best DDRP Yet?    Either way: magnifico!! 
That's what I said in the dream.   :-D
Really sorry I missed the second half of When Who's lines.  There was a bit of confusion for me with the script and then with what parts I was playing and I never got back to it.  But Oz did a wonderful job.  And then the really seamless editing.  Amzing how he did the “who's on first bit”  Really sounded like NickyP and I were going at it face-to-face.

Judy has plenty of other concerns and barely even acknowledges I do anything but buy models on line.  And then it's WE DON'T HAVE THE MONEY!  Why? health insurance.  Keeps going up and the wife needs it because of her increasingly fragile health. Everything is going wrong with her.  It's nothing major but just a nonstop succession of little things. And on-going pain management. I just need my protonix, prozac, lamical and the occasional ativan and I'll be fine.
— wildebeest obeisance

— more wildebeests, cavorting in the snow
Good to see them back, missed the buggers. 
— wildebeasts rule

So at work there's a new guy in the guard shack.  He's not named but he runs around all the time and generally tries to get noticed.  It's a mouse.  The other gurads want to set out traps.  The mouse dictated a little note to me asking to co-exist because it's cold outside.  It's hard for him to write without thumbs.  Somehow I think it's appropriate for the guards to be huddled by the space heater in the coat and scarf with bad lighting and a mouse perched on the desk before us.  Security officer Bob Cratchett here.  No I won't ask for Christmas off Security supervisor Scrooge  oh no, not the whole day certainly…

Form follows function… now that's a laugh.  Let's design something totally FUBAR and issue it and then change it over the years according to feedback and finally get it right… change to another brand new uniform and make all the same mistakes all over again and finally admit after a few years it was totally wrong and redesign it again but it's still not quite right and… meanwhile in a dark folder the uniform was designed thrity years ago and not implemented until now because waiting for some pig-headed old generals to retire.  Then the suggestion about the class A greens being scrapped that I made years ago is finally implemented this year… just in time for that guy's trial for giving the information to Wikileaks… great time to introduce the new dress uniform US Army.  But nice to see the Dres Blues as the new Class A uniform.  Has a certain Civil War feel to it with the officer rank tabs and sleeve width long service stripes.  
  
ayesinback at 11:43AM, Dec. 13, 2013
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@bravo
bravo1102 wrote:
health insurance.  Keeps going up  …  It's nothing major but just a nonstop succession of little things. And on-going pain management. I just need my protonix, prozac, lamical and the occasional ativan and I'll be fine.
 



and she knew to fasten her seatbelt …

So, a Christmas mouse. I think Itsjustar would vote on your side.
I have the caveat of “do no harm”.    If the wee thing runs out and gives one of your oldsters a heartache, you might have regrets.

might
 

— (wildebeest having a moment)
I just saw that this is my 1,999th post. Now the pressure is on.
I can't just write any stupid little thing on the 2,000th.
Or can I? (why break with tradition now?)
under new management
last edited on Dec. 13, 2013 11:49AM
Lonnehart at 12:19AM, Dec. 14, 2013
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Been watching the show “Too Cute” a bit too much.  Then again I like things that are cute… much to the horror of my coworkers who have to do something “manly” to regain their masculinity after watching the show (such as smash something).  -_-

I certainly hope they're really joking.  If they're not…
last edited on Dec. 14, 2013 12:20AM
HippieVan at 9:49PM, Dec. 14, 2013
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Just updated the top ten for this week, and stuff moved!
 
Mostly because of different comics updating again, but still - yay!
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Have a comic milestone, a community project or some comic-related news you’d like to see in
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ozoneocean at 8:35PM, Dec. 15, 2013
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Form follows function… now that's a laugh.  Let's design something totally FUBAR and issue it and then change it over the years according to feedback and finally get it right… change to another brand new uniform and make all the same mistakes all over again and finally admit after a few years it was totally wrong and redesign it again but it's still not quite right and… meanwhile in a dark folder the uniform was designed thrity years ago and not implemented until now because waiting for some pig-headed old generals to retire.  Then the suggestion about the class A greens being scrapped that I made years ago is finally implemented this year… just in time for that guy's trial for giving the information to Wikileaks… great time to introduce the new dress uniform US Army.  But nice to see the Dres Blues as the new Class A uniform.  Has a certain Civil War feel to it with the officer rank tabs and sleeve width long service stripes.  
 I mean in terms of the shape of a weapon or military architechure- from rifles, to jets, to the layout of a base, to the constructivist modernisim of the old battleship conning towers. :)
 
Uniforms are something else entirely. From what I've researched they tend to be massively based on tradition and as slow as anything to evolve. It has gotton a lot better in recent decades, but it's still slow and inefficent.
 
In a lot of ways the conservatisim helps me with my hussar outfit assembly:
Getting uniform trousers that are exactly in the style of the 1800's, 18010, 1840 ect whatever is easy because Britian was still making Number 1 dress uniforms in all those exact styles right up to the 1960s and beyond…  Boots, waistcoats, dress shirts, all the rest. You could also make a perfect hussar jacket just by stiching russia lace to a dress “stable jacket” if you want to go to the trouble.
 
Lonnehart at 10:40PM, Dec. 15, 2013
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Well, working on my drawing skills.  I may go back to the old method of drawing with pencil then scanning/editing when I get home.  Drawing pads are great, but for some odd reason a lot of story ideas come in at work.

Or maybe I can just write it out then “follow” my notes when I get home.

Okay… That Christmas song by Mariah Cary is playing again, and it creeps me out when I listen to it.  It makes me glad I'm still unattached.  Why?  Well…

It reminds me of this…
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Yandere
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Yandere/AnimeAndManga

Yeah… when a girl wants YOU for Christmas, it's best to run away….  X_X
(Just kidding!  I don't think girls who would do anything for your love… ANYTHING… EVEN MURDER… just to keep your love all to herself really exist)…

And on the subject of uniforms, where do you suppose the standard Santa Clause outfit came from?
last edited on Dec. 15, 2013 10:57PM
ozoneocean at 3:32AM, Dec. 16, 2013
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Lonnehart wrote:
And on the subject of uniforms, where do you suppose the standard Santa Clause outfit came from?
 
It's part of a very long tradition that evolved over time.
There was a myth that it was developed by Coke for an ad campaign in the ‘30s, which is easy to debunk since you see it on Christmas cards, dolls, ornaments, and illustrations from the 1800s.
There was an idea that it was more American and started in the mid 1800s, but the US traditions only make up a small part of the Christmas traditions. I think the problem these comes from the “Santa Claus” name, with people imagining that is the character’s main identity and not just another regional moniker for the same traditional character.
 

Interpretations of the outfit came from a few sources- the red style of older versions of the robe are based on ecclesiastical uniform (bishops, cardinals), then again red fur trimmed robes were also a symbol of royalty. But before the mid 1800s the outfit was green just as much as it was red, and we know the Father Christmas line of the character has associations with farther time and ceremonies with an old grey bearded man representing the dying old year and winter… and it goes a lot deeper and further.
 
The SHORT answer is that the people who give you a simple answer are dead wrong because the costume is based on an amalgam of lots of old traditional cultural images that have been simplified into the basic version you see today.
- Like anything old- Pirates are a great example! The costume of classical pirates outfits are based on all sorts of late 1700 outfits and illustrations by many artists simplified into what you see today, but a simple answer will be anything from Pirates of the Caribbean, Treasure Island or Arthur Rackham.
 
bravo1102 at 6:37AM, Dec. 16, 2013
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ozoneocean wrote:
  I mean in terms of the shape of a weapon or military architechure- from rifles, to jets, to the layout of a base, to the constructivist modernisim of the old battleship conning towers. :)
Uniforms are something else entirely. From what I've researched they tend to be massively based on tradition and as slow as anything to evolve. It has gotton a lot better in recent decades, but it's still slow and inefficent.

You need to do a lot more research. ;-)

Especially into modern uniform styles starting around the mid 19th Century.  The evolution of uniforms is all about form following function especially in the years following the American Civil War.  The function of the uniform has changed so therefore the form must change.   Often mere lip service was paid to tradition in succesful armies. “Here's a plume some epellettes and the cavalry gets a helmet because he rides…”
The ones that burdened their soldiers with excessive and old fashioned gear usually lost. Winning armies were then copied because their stuff worked.  The best examples of this are 1870, 1914 and 1940.  Whose uniforms were most functional and whose weren't? Who dresed for success on the batlefield and who derssed for the paradeground?  Dressed for the paradeground and you lose on the battlefield. Who was dressed for the last war and not this one?  Therefore form had better follow function or you're gonna end up with a pile of stuff thrown by the roadside and soldiers wearing nothing that was issued except their ammunition belt.  

 Where the rubber hits the road form follows function from the simple and inexpensive hoplite milita panalopy to the basic Roman Legionaires uniform to the modern French Legionaires uniform. All that traditional stuff that looks so foolish once upon a time did have a very simple function for a specific purpose.  Once the purpose is gone, the item remains until it gets in the way of fighting.  Unless one sets out to design the all new ultimate combat uniform of forever and gets it wrong and doesn't learn the lessons accumulated from years of expereince with the last uniform.  Read Uniforms of the Great Armies.  
ozoneocean at 7:45AM, Dec. 16, 2013
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That's not what I meant Bravo.
Obviously armies always simplified their gear for action but my interest revolves around the ceremonial/dress/official stuff. It's fascinating that things like cross-belts lasted sooooo long past their useful life in ALL armies just because- even though all the buckles and fittings atrophied into nothing more than fake versions of themselves: metal pieces all clipped on just there for show.
Sam Browne belts STILL hang around even now as symbols of authority in various places and forms even though their use ended long ago on working uniforms.
All the uniform traditions of US military academies were fascinating, with cadets wearing gear that was over 100 years out of date.
The evolution of the hussar uniform is amazing, especially since it was multiplied across so many countries all around the world… And it's still around today in a weird form as a traditional US bellboy outfit.
And of course US marching bands with their utterly bizarrely cartooninsh take on 19th century infantry bandsmen uniforms.
We can't forget the enduring global popularity of the Scottish piper outfits either, with the feather bonnets, 16th century style cote hardie jackets, the kilts, the huge white gaiters, sporrans!
 
HippieVan at 1:52PM, Dec. 16, 2013
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For whatever reason I've been feeling nostalgic recently about old DD users, even the troublesome ones. We really need to get these forums going again, if for no other reason than to prevent me from internet-stalking people I haven't talked to in years. XD
 

 
I'm having a hard time getting motivated to study for my last exam, because at this point I know enough to BS all the questions that might be on it. But I want an A+, darn it, and I actually need to have good examples and names and stuff for that! Back to work.
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Have a comic milestone, a community project or some comic-related news you’d like to see in
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kawaiidaigakusei at 2:08PM, Dec. 16, 2013
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bravo1102 wrote:
So at work there's a new guy in the guard shack. He's not named but he runs around all the time and generally tries to get noticed. It's a mouse. The other guards want to set out traps.
Traps are sad. For what it is worth, mice have a strong dislike for the scent of peppermint oil.
.::.
rant
I began wearing a custom mouth guard to sleep over one week ago. After x-rays found no severe damage and zero cavities, it was suggested that the pain in my upper molars was caused by a minor sleep bruxism (grinding of the teeth). This can lead to bigger issues like migraine headaches or TMJ. I have no way to confirm whether I grind in my sleep for obvious reasons. My main concerns are the underlying psychosocial factors that are a cause for alarm.
/rant
.::.
HippieVan wrote:
For whatever reason I've been feeling nostalgic recently about old DD users, even the troublesome ones.
(´・_・`) …even the troublesome ones?
last edited on Dec. 16, 2013 2:11PM
HippieVan at 11:48AM, Dec. 17, 2013
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kawaiidaigakusei wrote:
(´・_・`) …even the troublesome ones?
 
I think what I really mean are the ones who used to cause drama. I don't really remember having anyone who was outright nasty or anything(or if there were they didn't stick around long).
 

 
Fun story for you guys! My student group was sent free passes to a screening of Mandela. The semester isn't quite over yet though and everyone was busy with exams and final papers, so only four other people were planning on coming. Somehow three of them dropped out at the last minute (two were coming together) so it ended up just being me and this one other guy…who I hadn't even met before.
It ended up being alright as he was very nice (and had a very cute South African accent :P) but it was definitely one of the more awkward things that's happened to me.
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HippieVan at 12:09PM, Dec. 17, 2013
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Oh yeah, and here is some arm-knitted stuff (not adding this to the last post because I'm terrified of trying to edit a post without it going nuts)!
A throw for my chair
 

 
And my Soviet soldier keeping warm with an arm-knitted scarf:
 
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ozoneocean at 7:22PM, Dec. 17, 2013
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Wow, those sorts of Soviet hat are pretty traditional and quite uncommon! :D
Love the chair rug!
 

 
So my thousand buttons came. They're perfect.
If you need custom buttons made I reccomend Minsheng Hardware, search for them at Alibaba.com.
Not just plain ones like mine, you can have your own custom engraving/embossing on them, whatever you want. :)
 
They're so shiiiiiiinnny… I just want to unpack them all and run them through my hands. So beautiful!
 
——–
 
Hippie, the trick to editing posts is the “HTML” thing on the edit box.
Pro tips:
-Line brakes are done by making a dummy space filled a text character and then replace that with a normal space when you “update” the html, or just past in a & n b s p; (without spaces in between)
- For internal DD links remove the "http://" part.
- For multiple quotes just remove the author link text (in the HTML window). you can have as many perfect quotes s you like. You can always ad text effects like colour and bolding to fool people that they're the old style DD quotes… When I have time and can be bothered I do that stuff. :)
 
last edited on Dec. 17, 2013 7:32PM
bravo1102 at 7:43AM, Dec. 18, 2013
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Ths Soviet hat is anything but traditional being their adaptation of the soft brimmed boonie hat. The boonie hat was first intorduced in World War II for tropical service as far more functional and comfy than the tradional pith helmet or other stiff brimmed headgear.  Hardly traditional because in serivce they look anything but military and traditional stiff-necked types hate them.  

The specific history of various pieces of military equipment often puts lie to the “traditional” story because most things start out as highly functional then become vestiges of tradition until superceded by something better or acknowledged to be completely useless.  But they are functional before becoming traditional. 

Enough of that banter.  I finally pitched the idea for Attack of the Robofemoids to a production company and as expected they are interested.  I have to arrange the meeting to further discussion.  It'll probably go nowhere or it'll get stolen but at least it'll be out there and I'll have the satisfaction of knowing it was my idea even if no one else ever knows.
HippieVan at 8:28AM, Dec. 18, 2013
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ozoneocean wrote:
Wow, those sorts of Soviet hat are pretty traditional and quite uncommon! :D
 

I'm glad you like it! No one else ever seems as excited about that hat as me. :P

bravo wrote:
Ths Soviet hat is anything but traditional being their adaptation of the soft brimmed boonie hat. The boonie hat was first intorduced in World War II for tropical service as far more functional and comfy than the tradional pith helmet or other stiff brimmed headgear.  Hardly traditional because in serivce they look anything but military and traditional stiff-necked types hate them.  
The specific history of various pieces of military equipment often puts lie to the “traditional” story because most things start out as highly functional then become vestiges of tradition until superceded by something better or acknowledged to be completely useless.  But they are functional before becoming traditional. 
 

Not quiiiite sure what point you're making here. This hat in particular is nothing like a boonie hat, at least physically. I don't know the real terms, but it looks far more like an adaptation of one of those typical flat-topped caps with a visor. You're right that it's not “traditional” in the sense that it was only made in ‘79, though.
I’m not sure if you're saying that it would have been functional or not. It was certainly designed to be so for Afghan deserts and such.

—-

I was shopping for this year's Christmas ornament and found this:



If that's not Izzy, I'll eat my Soviet hat! :P
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ozoneocean at 8:45AM, Dec. 18, 2013
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I don't think you're right at all there Bravo. We call that style of hat a “giggle hat” in Australia and that is nothing like it from what I can see. The brim of Hippie's is firm and it has a buttoned up face cover.
 
I though it was a budenovka which was the old revolutionary Soviet hat that preceeded the popular ushanka as iconic Soviet hats. Hippie's hat is similar to the budenovka style but without the point on top. It's possibly an evolution/adaption of that type of hat. :)
 
————
 
IZZY!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Well done with the quotes BTW!
 
last edited on Dec. 18, 2013 8:49AM
bravo1102 at 9:17AM, Dec. 18, 2013
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Right I'll shut up now and go back to my Osprey MAA series and figuring out what Humbrol color best matches Soviet khaki.  World War 2 tropical “panama” hat the precursor to the 1979 issue cap worn in Afganistan and similar to the US rip stop fatigue caps commonly referred to as boonie hats.  It has nothing to do with the pointy budankova or the furry urshan thingee.  (The budankova is actually a winter adaptation of the infamous pickelhaube which the Russians originated.)
One is flat topped and the other has that lemon squeezer peak.  In wearing one it was squashed down because you're often wearing the hat under a helmet as was common Soviet practice in 'Stan.  

 US World War 2 variant of above.  Soft brimmed tropical fatigue hat replaced by a ball cap but that offered no neck protection. So enter this one:

Panama hat to fishing hat. The flattened top makes it easier to fit under a helmet.  Those loops are funny because most soldiers dismissed them as vestiges of the hat's origin with fishermen.  Too narrow to fit anything useful like bug repellent but just right for fishing lures. And I'm not putting bullets around the rim of my hat as was also suggested.  (they're for foliage camouflage)
last edited on Dec. 18, 2013 9:23AM
ozoneocean at 9:46AM, Dec. 18, 2013
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Nice history of the giggle hat :)
 
Hippie's hat is this one:
 

 
Without the extra botton on face cover it's the same as a budenovka without the point:
 

 
That also bottoned down to cover the face:
 
 
HippieVan at 3:14PM, Dec. 18, 2013
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ozoneocean wrote:
budenovka
  
WANT.

ozoneocean wrote:
Well done with the quotes BTW!
 

Why thank you! And it's only taken two years for me to figure it out!
Duchess of Friday Newsposts and the holy Top Ten
Have a comic milestone, a community project or some comic-related news you’d like to see in
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gullas at 4:26AM, Dec. 19, 2013
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Is it time for seasonal avatars? I think it is ^^
bravo1102 at 2:10PM, Dec. 19, 2013
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The budonovka was in Red Army issue from 1918 and was last used in 1940 during the Winter War with Finland.  It's wear was restricted to the winter.  The field cap (i also have one) replaced the pilotka side cap which was the standard Russian field hat from 1917 to the 1970's

I used to have one of these in it's DDR incarnation which was identical except it was a grayer khaki with a DDR badge on front.  You will find Soviet issued ones stamped “made in DDR” just like you'll find real World War II Russian uniforms stamped “Made in USA”  Ain't lend-lease grand.  
The pilotka replaced the visored cap for enlisted personnel in field dress seen below:



Even though the budanovak looks cool it was an impractical piece of junk to wear for 20th Century warfare.  What worked in 1840's wasn't right for 1918 as the Germans found out in 1915 when they abandoned the pickelhaube.  The budanovka as a military fashion has more in common with this:
And both were stiffened cardboard covered by cloth.  What was functional in 1840 even 1870 was impractical and best replaced by 1915.  But the Soviets brought something awful back.

I once ran into an expert on Russian World War I uniforms as a fancy dress party.  He loved my outfit which was a British World War II battledress of 5th Commando with the Special Operationa badge. 

Oh the good old days when I owned this stuff rather than 1/6th scale replicas of it.
bravo1102 at 2:19PM, Dec. 19, 2013
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My appointment to pitch the Attack of the Robofemoids as a movie is set for 8:30 Am tomorrow. They liked the idea and we played phone tag for two days with the guy constantly returning my calls.  It's a  positive feeling when someone returns your calls when you're selling him something.
 
We'll see.

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