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Comic art style categories - What is 'American'? And what if you're not?
irrevenant at 8:26PM, May 10, 2013
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I'm going through the “Create New Comic” screens.
These are the options for the art style section:

cartoon
american
manga
realism
sprite
sketch
experimental
photographic
stick figure

Cartoon, realism, sprite, sketch or experimental, manga and stick figure are all clear and commonly accepted descriptions of particular art styles.
So what, is everything else ‘American’ art style?  This has two huge problems:

“American art style” is too broad a term to be meaningful, covering everything from Andy Warhol to Whistler and beyond  (and incidentally includes examples of manga, sprite, experimental, etc. etc.).
An awful lot of us are from countries other than America and tend to think that our art styles aren't the property of that country?

Honestly, the more I look at it, the more confused I am about what that term is even supposed to mean.  Especially since it then goes on to ask about ‘genre’ and the american art style for superhero comics is very different from the (generally more indie-style) american art style for real life, romance or noir comics.
Can this be looked at, please?
 
Thanks
ozoneocean at 12:41AM, June 6, 2013
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I think “American” just means the standard semi-realistic stylised style that's comon for US comics, the same way there's a certain style that fits into the umbrella of “manga” but if you know manga comics you'll know that there's a massive range of difference and variation within that catagory.
 
Think of “American” as what most superhero comics use. -US indie comics are still thematically linked to the art style of superhero comics the same way comics on the far ends of the spectrum of manga are realated to each other.
 
It's stupid I know… but you should have seen the kerfuffle it took to whittle things down to just those @_@
 
last edited on June 6, 2013 12:44AM
irrevenant at 12:58AM, July 5, 2013
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Thank you for being so civil. :) I was a bit narky when I posted that, sorry.
BTW, I've just noticed an omission in Art Style: 3D/Poser comic.  That would make it a ton easier to make my selection for the DD Awards! xD
cdmalcolm1 at 1:52PM, July 9, 2014
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"American Freestyle' art is the style of early comicbook art from action comics and detective comic…which today are called marvel and DC comics. This was one of The ways how artist of the time gave birth to the jack Kirby like style. This type of art became American. The same holds true for manga. So if you are from another country, your style really came from America or Japan for comic book art. America commercialize cartooning and comicbook art. People from other counties got their hands on an American comic or cartoon and adopted to it then started to create their own like China's Jadmen comics, (which looked like a cross between manga and American freestyle with airbrushing and ink brushing). Japan even followed the Americans BUT they followed and hoped on the Disney train then ended up creating manga and anime due to the BIG eyes they got from watching Disney cartoons. They wanted their cartoons characters to look more like Americans than their own culture. That is the birth of anime and manga. So if it wasn't for people like Stan Lee, or Walt Disney who market their works, there may not have been anime or manga in the first place.

No other country created an outstanding look like Japan or America during the birth of comics. The only other one is ancient wall markings world wide. And no one commercialized it. so it remained an unpopular style of cartooning.
ozoneocean at 8:30PM, July 9, 2014
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I don't know Cdmalcom1, there are quite a lot of Belgian and French comics with their own particular styles, Herge in particular is known for his “clear line” style.
Their comic styles are centered around a more cartoony, exagerated look, less realistic than the popular American styles…
 
I don't doubt that it's all related, but those styles came to be earlier than Kirby and gang.
 
cdmalcolm1 at 9:55PM, July 9, 2014
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That is true and you are right. I guess my point is that it all comes down to marketing. Like with the smurfs. It was translated well and played the American market for years. The same with the Mexican comics. The fact that there are quite a few people here in the US that speak Spanish, I still see Spanish comics here and there.

My poor example here is with Jadmen Comics. Jadmen comics I loved as much as I did with any popular marvel or DC comics….when it was translated. What killed it for me was I couldn't read it. As beautiful as the art was, I loved following the story. So I ended up not buying it any more. They at one point admitted that marketing to overseas was tough. So they stop and focused on their own country. Which is fine but they went against their mission statement which was to introduce the world the tales of Chinese martial arts.

I think there should be more options in art styles.

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