Episode 452 - Storytelling styles change!

Nov 11, 2019

Storytelling styles change over time for various reasons: fashion, audience expectations, competition for audience attention due to increased choice and availability of media, technological limitations and abilities, and culture. We chat about the reasons for the changes and how styles have changed.

Topics and Show Notes

Technology is the easiest factor to point to: with the rise of Netflix offering binge watching more and more TV series turned to long story arcs and minimised the episodic aspects. This in turn influenced other media because audiences were primed to expect longer story arcs: comics, book series, games and even movies like the Marvel Universe have a focus on long story arcs over the course of several films.
For digital comics Scott McCloud talked about the idea of “infinite canvas” because comics on a screen are not limited by the area OF the screen but can move outside of it. No one really picked that up seriously, there were experiments made but nothing really took till Webtoons started to force creators to use their vertical scrolling format (for mobile phones), this in turn influenced a new style of storytelling: an entire chapter released as one continuous scroll made up of many connected single panels. You can listen to us chat about that on our Patreon only video :) - https://www.patreon.com/DrunkDuck

Although I think the TRUE genesis of the continuous scrolling chapter release was actually the sites that pirate and release manga titles. These were massively popular well before Webtoons came about. They'd release full manga issues with every page in one scrolling stream rather than single panels. It worked very well, whether reading it on a phone or full computer, despite the need to zoom in when using smaller screens (a single panel column is a silly, arbitrary limitation).

Another huge influence for storytelling styles has been choice: there is now a huge range of easily accessible media available so stories need to be able to grab their audience quickly and keep them, or they just move on to the next thing. This goes for all formats (movies, books etc). This means that most stories start off rather fast now, often dropping you in the action and quickly introducing characters, as opposed to the much slower pace of older styles.
Listen to the full cast to find out more!

This week Gunwallace has given us the theme to The Jacket Comic: Wiry, punk, gritty, shiny and cool, this one jangles in on lyrical chords, sounding indie-rock with an almost Arabian flavour at times as the strings howl and echo up and down the scales. A rocky tune it for the coolest jacket in the world.

Topics and shownotes

Featured comic:
Full House by Projectnutz - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2019/nov/06/featured-comic-full-house-by-projectnutz/

Featured music:
The Jacket Comic - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/The_Jacket_Comic/, by RTHaldeman, rated M.


Special thanks to:
Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com
Tantz Aerine - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine/
Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean
Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes
kawaiidaigakusei - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/kawaiidaigakusei/

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Episode 441 - Cooperation = cool

Aug 26, 2019

2 likes, 0 comments

Cooperation Vs Competition. For decades the mantra was competition is good: it produces progress and makes things better… Well that's actually false. Competition is what you're forced into as a response to limited resources, so you do what you have to to win, which mainly involves losing everything that doesn't serve that specific objective. Competition is massively harmful to progress in general, it ONLY helps you excel in one small area to massive cost. Think of it in terms of an Olympic sprinter: they become the fastest runner in the world, but to what point? Only the artificial structure of a sporting event… they spend years training, exercising, eating right, wasting a huge portion of their lives, creative, and intellectual potential on that one meaningless goal, and IF they achieve it they might get a bit of fame and money and a footnote in history because someone else will inevitably take their spot. More likely though they won't achieve the goal and instead be forgotten.

Episode 375 - Categories, genres and rants

May 21, 2018

3 likes, 5 comments

In this Quackcast we chat about the categorisation of work by specific genres and how it makes it easier to promote your work to people, while for fans it makes it easier to find what you're into, but it can also be a bad thing when people categorise too specifically and narrow their audience to nothing or just pointlessly confuse the crap out of people. I came to this topic because I saw a post on Facebook which was very badly explaining “Steampunk” and “Dieselpunk” while introducing the two utterly superfluous sub-genre names of “Ray-punk” and Atom-punk“.

Episode 373 - Stupid millennials, greedy baby-boomers and lazy Gen Xers!

May 7, 2018

4 likes, 5 comments

Millennials are so dumb, Gen Xers are SO lazy, and those Baby-boomers are just greedy as hell aren't they? But seriously, in THIS Quackcast we chat about the different generations of webcomicers and what's changed and what we have to learn from each other. The first generation of real webcomics came in with Sluggy Freelance, 8 bit theatre and a few others. Webcomics started out in the mid 90s as the web version of “Zines”: independent creator driven personal projects. The second generation came about in the 2000s. Sites like Drunk Duck and Keen Space were a huge part of that. It made it easier for creators to make the jump online. We'd seen what those first guys did and now it was OUR turn, there were a lot of copy-cats in this generation, but a lot of experimentation and creativity too, with sound, animation, interactivity and infinite canvas being a mainstay. Later there was an explosion in hosting sites like DD and comicers moved on to other formats like Tumbler and Twitter etc. The pro comic publishers saw how things were going and tried to get in on the act with online comics too. I think the 3rd generation saw a lot of commercial focussed projects. Comicers saw it as a way to make money so we had a lot of slick, pro work flooding in. In the 4th generation I think we have people doing comics for mobile devices or ON mobile devices. A lot of the comic hosting sites have far more limitations on work than they used to in terms of content and format, a lot of stuff has a bit of a pre-packaged feel, you see almost no experimentation with format now. On the upside though quality is a lot higher and comic sites will reliably work a lot better than they used to. Styles have changed over the generations: In the old days most comics were fully drawn and scanned. Tablets were rare and very expensive and so were graphics programs. If you saw a fully digital comic back then you knew the artist was either a pro or they were at university with access to high level equipment - or it was dodgy work done with a mouse and Windows Paint. Those tools have become far more accessible now and the barriers have come right down. Most work is digital. What generation are you? This week Gunwallace has given us the theme to DreamcomicbookDOTcom! Journey into a claustrophobically narrow electronic service tunnel, filled with high voltage wires humming with unimaginable power and mysterious cables running off endlessly into the dim, dark shadows in the distance. The creepy patterings and low hum of this music will take you there!

Episode 265 - Drunk Duck updates and the future

Apr 4, 2016

3 likes, 4 comments

For Quackcast 265 I wanted to steer the direction toward the idea of future fixes and features for Drunk Duck! We talked a bit about the 2nd wave of fixes that will be happening now- HippieVan worked to gather people's suggestions for the most important bugs that needed fixing (with our limited funds), and features people want added, and then did a survey to find what people though were the highest priority. It was a lot of work and took a few weeks to come up with the results. Bellow is a summery of what she learned:

Episode 198 - Fallopian Crusader to the rescue!

Dec 22, 2014

6 likes, 5 comments

Merry XXX-mas! For Quackcast 198 Banes and I interview our second ever adult comic creator, the venerable Fallopiancrusader, on the anniversary of his comic being hosted on DD no less! His comic, "Rimjob" is as hard-core as they come. It's a spoof of the story in the videogame Skyrim: Khthonis, an orc woman is set for execution along with some other prisoners, the way she escapes though is quite a lot different to the events of the game! Fallopiancrusader is an amazingly talented and experienced artist, as you can see from the amazing realism and artistry of his artwork on Rimjob, in fact it's very difficult to find more artistic porn. A graphic designer by trade and skilled at many styles, one of Fallopiancrusader's reasons for creating Rimjob was simply to experiment with a new style! I think you'll agree that he succeeded admirably. If you haven't read Rimjob yet it'll be a rare treat for you. Rimjob is a NSFW adults only 18+ comic so if you're not singed up with the site and you're not 18+ you won't be able to view it. If that's the case though I've included links to two images Fallopiancrusader made for the DD awards so you can see his artistry at depicting his character Khthonis. Also: enjoy the brilliant Bladerunner style theme Gunwallace made for Holon!

Episode 176 - Endings, part 3

Jul 21, 2014

4 likes, 5 comments

For our FINAL part of our discussion of story endings we talk about yet MORE ending tropes, methods and styles. In a fit of towering arrogance and indefensible pomposity we even trash the mighty Shakespeare for his ending of Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet! Our contributors offered up some truly interesting perspectives on the matter or constructing story endings and we give them their due respect by reading them out in strange voices... As I've said in all of these so far: writing the end of a story is the hardest part so we hope to provide some clues on how to write a good one. Ad with that we reach the END of our exploration of ends! Next week we interview AMY and Nick from CHARBY THE VAMPIRATE!!!

Episode 139 - Telling Gender From Comic Styles

Oct 28, 2013

5 likes, 7 comments

For Quackcast 139 Banes and I were joined by Kawaiidaigakusei, who had an amazingly interesting subject to talk about: “Telling Someone's Sex By the Way They Draw". Kawaiidaigakusei says:This has been a subject matter that is of great interest to me since college, and I am sure a lot of people who draw webcomics can relate. The early periods of Western Art have been mostly dominated by men. Female artists were rare during the Baroque Period with the exception of a key figure, Artemisia Gentileschi, whose dark interpretation of Judith Beheading Holofernes can be read with psychoanalytic overtones of a woman asserting her dominance over a man by decapitation. The twentieth century welcomed an influx of women artists during the Feminist art movement that began in the late 1960s. In the present day, with the introduction of webcomics and the Internet, women and men now have a level playing field to showcase their art to the public. Now the question remains–Is it possible to tell a person's sex by the way they draw?


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