Episode 436 - Master of none?

Jul 22, 2019

To become truly successful at one thing you need to focus on that alone. Is it worth it? There are MANY calls on our time with all the side things we like to do, ESPECIALLY webcomics. One of the few ways to become a really successful superstar at any one thing is to start dropping all the other things that call on your time and devote all your energy to that one thing! Then you can push past all limitations and devote the effort and time needed to properly succeed.

Topics and Show Notes

But the real question you have to ask yourself is “Do you really want to?”. A lot of us find great joy and fulfilment in working on our side things, even when they can be a bit of a chore, so, is it worth it to drop all of them for as long as it takes to succeed on that “one thing”?
We have to realise that “one thing” isn't necessarily better than another, being a superstar high profile webcomicer isn't inherently better than being a good webcomicer and also having a good job, other fulfilling hobbies, being a great gamer, being a great student, father, mother, or just someone who likes to relax and enjoy themselves in their free time. Are you prepared to sacrifice that stuff and is it even worth it? For most of us I would say “no”. Great if you can, but do NOT feel bad if you can't.

We mainly chat about what it takes to be a popular and successful webcomicer and why that might not really be what you want.

This topic occurred to me because I have a lot of things on my own plate: two webcomics with a high level of art in them, I do illustrative art, I sew and do cosplay, I do a podcast, I run a webcomic hosting site (Drunk Duck), I collect antique sabres, then there's my day job as a graphic designer… (and more things). That all takes a lot of my time and I know that if I dropped some or most of those things and just laser focussed on ONE I could be very popular and successful at it, but the thing is that I don't really want to since I love doing all those things and I don't think that's the lessor choice. What about you guys?


This week Gunwallace has given us the theme to Nincu the world’s worst ninja: Silence punctuated by the gentle strains of traditional Japanese music, beautiful and subtle, minimal yet essential… Then we slide on down a crazy swanny whistle into the dark rocky world of 1970s James Bond style electric guitars, portending great action and danger!

Topics and shownotes

Featured comic:
The Caraway Crew - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/The_Caraway_Crew/

Featured music:
Nincu the world’s worst ninja - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/Nincu_the_worlds_worst_ninja_/, by Oscarnjboy, rated M.


Special thanks to:
Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com
Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/
Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean
kawaiidaigakusei - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/kawaiidaigakusei/

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Episode 408 - The imitation game

Jan 6, 2019

2 likes, 2 comments

Happy new year! This is the first Quackcast recorded in 2019! Pitface is back too, can you believe it? In this Quackcast we chat about Imitation, based on Amelius's newspost from last Sunday. How do you know if someone has copied your work, just been influenced by it or influenced from the same sources as you, or has actually stolen your work wholesale? And what do you DO about it? Is imitation or someone doing the same thing as your “original” idea, always a bad thing?

Episode 373 - Stupid millennials, greedy baby-boomers and lazy Gen Xers!

May 7, 2018

4 likes, 5 comments

Millennials are so dumb, Gen Xers are SO lazy, and those Baby-boomers are just greedy as hell aren't they? But seriously, in THIS Quackcast we chat about the different generations of webcomicers and what's changed and what we have to learn from each other. The first generation of real webcomics came in with Sluggy Freelance, 8 bit theatre and a few others. Webcomics started out in the mid 90s as the web version of “Zines”: independent creator driven personal projects. The second generation came about in the 2000s. Sites like Drunk Duck and Keen Space were a huge part of that. It made it easier for creators to make the jump online. We'd seen what those first guys did and now it was OUR turn, there were a lot of copy-cats in this generation, but a lot of experimentation and creativity too, with sound, animation, interactivity and infinite canvas being a mainstay. Later there was an explosion in hosting sites like DD and comicers moved on to other formats like Tumbler and Twitter etc. The pro comic publishers saw how things were going and tried to get in on the act with online comics too. I think the 3rd generation saw a lot of commercial focussed projects. Comicers saw it as a way to make money so we had a lot of slick, pro work flooding in. In the 4th generation I think we have people doing comics for mobile devices or ON mobile devices. A lot of the comic hosting sites have far more limitations on work than they used to in terms of content and format, a lot of stuff has a bit of a pre-packaged feel, you see almost no experimentation with format now. On the upside though quality is a lot higher and comic sites will reliably work a lot better than they used to. Styles have changed over the generations: In the old days most comics were fully drawn and scanned. Tablets were rare and very expensive and so were graphics programs. If you saw a fully digital comic back then you knew the artist was either a pro or they were at university with access to high level equipment - or it was dodgy work done with a mouse and Windows Paint. Those tools have become far more accessible now and the barriers have come right down. Most work is digital. What generation are you? This week Gunwallace has given us the theme to DreamcomicbookDOTcom! Journey into a claustrophobically narrow electronic service tunnel, filled with high voltage wires humming with unimaginable power and mysterious cables running off endlessly into the dim, dark shadows in the distance. The creepy patterings and low hum of this music will take you there!


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