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Funny, stupid words and things specific to your country, region whatever...?
Emily Elizabeth at 8:36AM, July 27, 2009
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England has the oddest words ever. Especially the young people in London.

Minger: Ugly
Baffed: Confused
Bere: as in, lots, to be used like this ‘There are bere mingers round that area’
Ends: Area
Peng: Good, as in ‘That film was bere peng’
Creps: Trainers
Cushty: Good, fine
Allow it: Forget it (You mean that film's not on, aw, allow it, man.'
Blud/Bruv: Friend
'Ave it!: Go for it
Blates: Obvious, blatant
Innit: Isn't it. To be used after every sentence. ‘We gonna go down them ends innit.’
Rah-tid: What the hell
Mandem, Boydem, Galdem: Man, girl, boy
Youngaz: Younger people
Oldaz: Older people
Wass gwannin: What's going on, what's up

Don't even get me started on Cockney Rhyming slang. D:
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:21PM
ParkerFarker at 3:33AM, July 28, 2009
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Croi Dhubh
12. Blinker
-Your turn signal

that's what we say in Australia. It makes sense in my opinion, your “turn signal” blinks doesn't it?

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:39PM
ozoneocean at 3:51AM, July 28, 2009
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Emily Elizabeth
England has the oddest words ever. Especially the young people in London.
lol! I've heard that stuff called “Ja-fakin” :)
Emily Elizabeth
Don't even get me started on Cockney Rhyming slang. D:
What shits me is when fellow Aussies claim that rhyming slang is “typically Australian”. No it bloody isn't, it's all taken from the poms and probably not even that long ago either! (they'd like to crap on about convict times…) It probably all came over with the later waves of immigration in the 50's and 60's.
ParkerFarker
Croi Dhubh
12. Blinker
-Your turn signal
that's what we say in Australia. It makes sense in my opinion, your “turn signal” blinks doesn't it?
Some people call it that… I call it an indicator.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:34PM
Hawk at 7:28AM, July 28, 2009
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It's hard to know what words in your language are weird without having somebody from another country to bounce them off of. But apparently it's a bit strange that Americans call petroleum “gas”.

In other places it's “fuel” or “petrol”, but we call it “gas” (short for gasoline).
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:46PM
AQua_ng at 8:07AM, July 28, 2009
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Emily Elizabeth
England has the oddest words ever. Especially the young people in London.

Minger: Ugly
Baffed: Confused
Bere: as in, lots, to be used like this ‘There are bere mingers round that area’
Ends: Area
Peng: Good, as in ‘That film was bere peng’
Creps: Trainers
Cushty: Good, fine
Allow it: Forget it (You mean that film's not on, aw, allow it, man.'
Blud/Bruv: Friend
'Ave it!: Go for it
Blates: Obvious, blatant
Innit: Isn't it. To be used after every sentence. ‘We gonna go down them ends innit.’
Rah-tid: What the hell
Mandem, Boydem, Galdem: Man, girl, boy
Youngaz: Younger people
Oldaz: Older people
Wass gwannin: What's going on, what's up

Don't even get me started on Cockney Rhyming slang. D:

When I first read those words, I was thinking ‘My goodness, what a ridiculous lexicon,’ but then I realised that I use most of those in my everyday language.

K.A.L.A-dan! Brigade Captain :D
K.A.L.A.-dan forums!
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:59AM
Kristen Gudsnuk at 9:02PM, July 28, 2009
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some people call Subway sandwiches subs or hoagies or heroes, but I just call them sandwiches.

I'm from New England, where we speak the purest, most pristine form of English.
our slang:

Yacht: our boat
Mansion: the summer cottage
Chauffeur: Ralph
J. Crew: standard uniform


oh here is a legit one:
Housie: Housatonic river? (pronounced whoo-zie, not house-ey, a mistake I made as well)

we call blinkers blinkers too; turn signal's too vague! (it can be a hand motion…)

Oh and some people around here pronounce horror funny– instead of saying like “WHORE-er” they say “hah-ruh”. “hah-ruh-bull” instead of “WHOREible.” My mom pronounces hero “heh-ro” instead of “hee-ro.”

Another thing, we swallow our t's sometimes– Latin, for instance, is “La-in” and Shelton, my lovely hometown, is “Shell-in.” (And Huntington is pronounced “honey-ng-tun” although I used to pronounce it like any rational person would (hunting-tun).
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:23PM
Emily Elizabeth at 5:58AM, July 29, 2009
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AQua_ng
When I first read those words, I was thinking ‘My goodness, what a ridiculous lexicon,’ but then I realised that I use most of those in my everyday language.

I know. I hate to admit it, but I actually tend to speak like a Cockney chimney sweep. D: I don't even realize I'm doing it.

I have a posh Joanna Lumley voice for when I'm on the phone though XD
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:21PM
Ironscarf at 6:20AM, July 29, 2009
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Emily Elizabeth
I know. I hate to admit it, but I actually tend to speak like a Cockney chimney sweep. D: I don't even realize I'm doing it.

I have a posh Joanna Lumley voice for when I'm on the phone though XD

Cor Blimey, what an absolutely marvellous linguistic collaboration me old china!
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:02PM
skoolmunkee at 10:21AM, July 29, 2009
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I'm always getting called out for saying things like ‘pants’ and ‘gas’… everyone knows what I mean, they just like to make fun of me for it.
  IT'S OLD BATMAN
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:42PM
amanda at 11:04AM, July 29, 2009
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Just heard another one:
“Let me take a look-see.”
last edited on July 14, 2011 10:52AM
Kristen Gudsnuk at 2:23PM, July 29, 2009
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Emily Elizabeth
I have a posh Joanna Lumley voice for when I'm on the phone though XD

PATSY FROM AB FAB?!?!?!
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:23PM
ozoneocean at 11:42PM, July 29, 2009
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skoolmunkee
I'm always getting called out for saying things like ‘pants’ and ‘gas’
Pants and Gas go together amusingly :)
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:34PM
Lonnehart at 1:27AM, July 30, 2009
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ozoneocean
skoolmunkee
I'm always getting called out for saying things like ‘pants’ and ‘gas’
Pants and Gas go together amusingly :)

I think you can only put them together if you add refried beans…
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:39PM
ParkerFarker at 6:38AM, July 30, 2009
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ozoneocean
Some people call it that… I call it an indicator.

really? That sounds so American. You don't call round-a-bouts rotaries do you???


Kristen Gudsnuk
Another thing, we swallow our t's sometimes– Latin, for instance, is “La-in” and Shelton, my lovely hometown, is “Shell-in.” (And Huntington is pronounced “honey-ng-tun” although I used to pronounce it like any rational person would (hunting-tun).

I sometimes swallow my Ts, although sometimes I pronounce them as Ds. Like “Mittens” I would say “Middens”.

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:39PM
ozoneocean at 7:51AM, July 30, 2009
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ParkerFarker
really? That sounds so American. You don't call round-a-bouts rotaries do you???
Of course not!
Eh, I don't think it's American :)
You know, shops like supermarkets, corner shops, bookshops etc are now called “stores” by people here…

People are losing their local vocabulary :(
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:34PM
seventy2 at 9:50AM, July 30, 2009
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ParkerFarker
I sometimes swallow my Ts, although sometimes I pronounce them as Ds. Like “Mittens” I would say “Middens”.

that's very american. i know few people who pronounce the T as Tea, when it's in the middle of a word. most (including me) use d.



Puff
-'Win' rhymes with ‘when’

it doesnt?
facara
Running Anew an exercise blog.
I'm gonna love you till the money comes, half of it's gonna be mine someday.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:30PM
Emily Elizabeth at 10:09AM, July 30, 2009
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Kristen Gudsnuk
Emily Elizabeth
I have a posh Joanna Lumley voice for when I'm on the phone though XD

PATSY FROM AB FAB?!?!?!


YEAHHH! Ab Fab is amazing! :D
last edited on July 14, 2011 12:21PM
ozoneocean at 10:50AM, July 30, 2009
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seventy2
Id doesn'd?
Fixed.

My T's always sound like a T should. -_-
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:34PM
seventy2 at 5:02PM, July 30, 2009
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ozoneocean
seventy2
Id doesn'd?
Fixed.

My T's always sound like a T should. -_-

not quite. it, and doesn't (and quite) still have the T sound. however, Seventy2 would be pronounced seven-dee-two. or that's not my dad, that's my step-fadder.
——-

another one i just thought of was adding a stressed “a” sound to words. such as “to” would be i'm going tuh do that. or i'm gonnuh get around to it
facara
Running Anew an exercise blog.
I'm gonna love you till the money comes, half of it's gonna be mine someday.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:30PM
Ryan_Scott at 6:33PM, July 30, 2009
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Oh I just thought of another great Kiwi one that makes NO sense at all…

When we like something, or something is really cool we say that it's “CHOICE”… or even that it's “CHOOOICE!”

Fucked if I know why…

Similar to this is CHUR! Can also be used as a statement of agreement.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:15PM
Kristen Gudsnuk at 7:45PM, July 30, 2009
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ParkerFarker
I sometimes swallow my Ts, although sometimes I pronounce them as Ds. Like “Mittens” I would say “Middens”.

for me it's mi--ins. Although sometimes I pronounce my t's (when I talk slowly).

Oddly, my d's come out like rolled r's. like when I (or others from 'round here) say “potato,” the second t is like a rolled r.
last edited on July 14, 2011 1:23PM
ParkerFarker at 8:48PM, July 30, 2009
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ozoneocean
You know, shops like supermarkets, corner shops, bookshops etc are now called “stores” by people here…

People are losing their local vocabulary :(

man, I'm still only a yoooouuuttthhh and I know better than that.

Kristen Gudsnuk
ParkerFarker
Oddly, my d's come out like rolled r's. like when I (or others from 'round here) say “potato,” the second t is like a rolled r.

I am struggling to comprehend this one. As in I don't get it. :gem:

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:39PM
ozoneocean at 9:16PM, July 30, 2009
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seventy2
not quite. it, and doesn't (and quite) still have the T sound. however, Seventy2 would be pronounced seven-dee-two. or that's not my dad, that's my step-fadder.
——-

another one i just thought of was adding a stressed “a” sound to words. such as “to” would be i'm going tuh do that. or i'm gonnuh get around to it
Could that be more of an accent thing than just weather or not your pronounce words correctly though? In that case ALL your pronunciations are “correct”, just in your own accent. :)

I'm sure a lot of the words I say must seem strange in the way I say them to a lot of you guys.

Ryan_Scott would eat fush and chups for example, while I eat fish and chips.
…that's fish and “French fries” to you guys I suppose…? lol!

———————-
On accents and ways of saying things-
-I love how “j” is “h” to Spanish speakers.
-I love how “j” is “y” to some Slavic speakers.
-I love of “w” and “v” are reveresed for Slavic speakers. “Wladimir is a Wampire! Vagner said so.” :) They also get “she” and “he” mixed up when speaking English.
-I love that some south Asian peoples seem to reverse the “l” and “r” sounds.
-I love the way some snotty posh English people turn all their “R” sounds into “w”.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:34PM
Redemption at 1:01AM, July 31, 2009
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ozoneocean
Ryan_Scott would eat fush and chups for example, while I eat fish and chips.
…that's fish and “French fries” to you guys I suppose…? lol!

Fish and chips are part of the colonial link, right? So if in Australia they're feesh and cheeps and we're fush and chups over the ditch… what do we order in mother England's pubs?

Foosh and choops? :|

Updates Thursdays.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:03PM
ParkerFarker at 6:28AM, July 31, 2009
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oh, and in Australia (probably not only in Australia) we say "I couldN'T care less“. and In my 3 years of living in NY I only heard a ”I could care less“ which makes no sense. The statement means ”I don't care". So if you could care less, then you do care a little bit. If you couldn't care less, then you have absolutley no care for whatever it is

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:39PM
Croi Dhubh at 12:04PM, July 31, 2009
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ParkerFarker
Croi Dhubh
12. Blinker
-Your turn signal

that's what we say in Australia. It makes sense in my opinion, your “turn signal” blinks doesn't it?
I agree. I say “indicator” and people would get confused :mad:

Oh, and another one:

Clicker - Your TV remote or garage door opener…neither clicks…
Liberate Tutemae Ex Inferis
Moderatio est Figmentum: Educatio est Omnium Efficacissima Forma Rebellionis

http://weblog.xanga.com/CroiDhubh - Home to the “Chuck E. Cheese Terror” stories
last edited on July 14, 2011 11:55AM
ozoneocean at 11:50AM, Aug. 1, 2009
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ParkerFarker
“I could care less”
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was under the impression that phrasing was American Jewish in origin. It sounds like something Woody Allen would say…
Redemption
So if in Australia they're feesh and cheeps
NooooOooooOOOOooooo D:



It's true… we do sound like that.
*uck >_<
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:34PM
seventy2 at 4:45PM, Aug. 1, 2009
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ozoneocean
ParkerFarker
“I could care less”
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was under the impression that phrasing was American Jewish in origin. It sounds like something Woody Allen would say…
Redemption
So if in Australia they're feesh and cheeps
NooooOooooOOOOooooo D:



It's true… we do sound like that.
*uck >_<

i always thought it would be more like fesh and cheps.
facara
Running Anew an exercise blog.
I'm gonna love you till the money comes, half of it's gonna be mine someday.
last edited on July 14, 2011 3:30PM
ParkerFarker at 3:14AM, Aug. 2, 2009
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ozoneocean
ParkerFarker
“I could care less”
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was under the impression that phrasing was American Jewish in origin. It sounds like something Woody Allen would say…

well I wouldn't be surprised. When I lived in America, the school I went to was about 70% Jewish.

“We are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun.” - Blackadder
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:39PM
ozoneocean at 8:15AM, Aug. 2, 2009
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seventy2
i always thought it would be more like fesh and cheps.
Eh, could be… I dunno, I'd have to get a Kiwi and ask him how I sound.
ParkerFarker
well I wouldn't be surprised. When I lived in America, the school I went to was about 70% Jewish.
It's brought a wonderful diversity to the English language throughout the world. There's a certain ridiculous, put-upon humour in the phrasings that come from that part of America.
 
last edited on July 14, 2011 2:34PM

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