Episode 425 - Pay-off or rip-off?

May 6, 2019

In this Quackcast we chat about set-ups. pay-offs, and rip-offs. To make your climaxes and endings more satisfying you have pay-offs for audience expectations: set them up in the story and pay them off at the end. If you fail to pay-off then you get a rip-off, it's pretty simple. Your audience will be really disappointed. That's not to say disappointing and unsatisfying ends to stories are wrong, not at all! Often those are fully intended. We're just talking about satisfying audiences, not “good” endings.

Topics and Show Notes

There are a lot of ways to do this, oh so many… building up the emotional development of a character in the story and giving them an emotional pay-off is a small scale why of doing this. On a larger scale you can have a satisfying end battle where the forces of darkness are defeated in a resounding way. A “Checkov's gun” that was hinted at earlier finally comes into play… or maybe you just have all sorts of great call backs to hints of things mentioned earlier in the story, rewarding the careful watcher.
This topic was inspired by both Emma Clare and Tantz Aerine's opinions of the Avengers Endgame and the 8th season of Game Of Thrones.


This week Gunwallace has given us a Requiem for Tupapayon, our recently departed and loved member of the site: A haunting, sepulchral piece… a deep, brooding, melancholy requiem that expresses the reverence and sadness we feel for our departed ducker, Isaac Ramirez, aka Tupapayon. It takes us into the dark shadows of a lofty gothic cathedral, where the magic of coloured light through stained glass paints the cold stone floor, shining through the gloom, the same way Tupapayon would always light up the site with his presence.

Topics and shownotes

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Featured comic:
Angels of the Fallen - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2019/apr/29/featured-comic-angels-of-the-fallen/

Featured music:
Requiem for Tupapayon - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2019/may/01/rip-tupapayon/

Links:
RIP Tupapayon - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2019/may/01/rip-tupapayon/

Emma Clare on Set-ups and pay-offs in fiction - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2019/may/02/a-confused-rant-about-setup-and-payoff/
Tantz Aerine's counterpunch - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2019/may/03/a-proposed-counterargument/

Special thanks to:
Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com
Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/banes
Tantz Aerine - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine/
PitFace - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/PIT_FACE/
Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean

Episode 271 - Pitface’s tales of ribaldry

May 15, 2016

6 likes, 0 comments

What makes the “meat” of a story? What makes you fall in love with it, keep coming back for more watches or reads or whatever? I contend it has nothing to do with conflict or culminations or climaxes, those are merely generic structural plottings that are pretty much the same format no matter what story you read- you know they're coming and you know what form they'll take and once they're over it's not really that significant anymore; “re-playability” is low, they're just too tied in with the story structure to have much life away from it in your mind. What keeps me coming back to a story and fall in love with it are the Characters, exploring the world in which they exist, and the development that occurs during the story. Gunwallace provides us a theme to CTV Revamped, the new version of Charby the Vampirate! Good and creepy techno for Charbs!

Episode 235 - Climax of the Climaxes

Sep 7, 2015

3 likes, 3 comments

Pitface joins Ozone and Banes again for the second and last part of the climax cast! It's the climax of the climax casts!! We discuss what people think about climaxes in stories, their own and those they watch or read. It's hard to write up to climaxes and even harded to write down from them but they're a good way to pull in and then reward your audience. Different types of stories have to use different types of climaxes, i.e. long series may need to have one every chapter and then one at the end of the arc. You have to adjust to the needs of your story. We read great contributions from some very clever DDers in cool voices :) Gunwallace gave us a gorgeous theme for Just Busty Solar the hilarious adult comedy strip~

Episode 234 - Climactic Climaxes!

Aug 31, 2015

5 likes, 2 comments

What's best? One big climax, multiple small ones, early, or delayed? How much should you work UP to a climax? What about anticlmactic events, how important are they? Climaxes are really important in stories. Often you work up to them over the course of a whole series, but each episode or chapter can have them, maybe even every single page. I find writing “up” to climaxes a bit stressful because you have a lot of preasure and expectation there. And when it's over and you've actually achieved it, it can be a bit depressing: where do you go to from there? You can feel a little lost, at least I do. TALKING ABOUT WRITING HERE. My preference is for multiple climaxes. Do you always need climaxes in stories? I don't think you do personally… there are times when things work fine without one, but it does help better with endings. Sometimes climaxes can be TOO big. Way too much of a story can be invested in a climax, it subsumes everything, everything has to tie in with that specific story flow and that can be REALLY had to pull off. If it's not done right it can be massively disappointing. Anticlimactic. Pitface Joins Banes and Ozone to chat about climaxes in stories and read out the contributions from our climactic contributors. Gunwallace gave us a gorgeous theme for Just Another Day!

Episode 228 - Conflicting conflicts conflict

Jul 19, 2015

4 likes, 0 comments

This time we're talking about conflict in webcomic writing, and any writing in general really. Conflict is one of the main drivers of a story, so you pretty much have to have it in there somewhere! But how do you approach it? Do you set it up really carefully or just put a bunch of volatile characters together and see what happens? I think for a lot of us we don't think too much about the science of our conflicts, rather we approach it artistically and develop things by feel and instinct because conflict is such an intrinsic trait. But understanding how you use it can be very useful when you're writing satisfying resolutions and climaxes. A good understanding of the types of conflict in your story is also pretty essential when you're writing a good comedy (it's a great source of humour!), and also when you're explaining or selling your work to the public: It's all very well to chat about your clever setting and your funky characters, but conflict is the reason they're IN a story to begin with and that's really what will get people wanting to read out it. I hope you enjoy Gunwallace's great porn style music type theme for Tales of Two Tiny Titty bars!


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